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Old 05-27-2021, 09:28 AM   #21
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Do not fill the copper tube with sand to bend it! Sand is the enemy of gas orifices. Simply use a copper tube bender. A copper tube bender, used properly, will not kink the tube.
Be sure the copper tube is large enough to supply the furnace. It will probably need to be 1/2" OD for that purpose, but you can look it up based on BTUs and length.
When you have to make a T fitting, or terminate at an appliance, do it with flare fittings. Compression is used with water and very likely will leak if used with soft copper and gas. Flare fittings are used with gas.
Do not use type K. This is for severe service water connections and swimming pool light conduit under ground. Way to heavy to bend and flare. Type L soft copper in a roll, or other specifically designed for gas service is the proper material. If you want to step it up to the next level of material, look at the Gas-Tec tube. It is designed specifically for propane use and has a coating to protect it.

https://www.supplyhouse.com/Kamco-21...8aAgk6EALw_wcB
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Old 05-27-2021, 09:41 AM   #22
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I needed to slightly re-locate the furnace propane supply tubing in my Boler 17 to attach to my new Propex HS2800.

I was able to re-bend copper tubing, adding a couple of 90 degree angles using a bending tool purchased at HD. After a little practice and a lot of patience, it worked great. The bending tool operates much more easily and smoothly if the tubing is first lubricated.
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Old 05-27-2021, 12:01 PM   #23
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Agree that sand is not ideal but salt seems like it would be easy enough to empty and then flush with water to dissolve remaining crystals.

The HD/Husky bending tool looks good for up to 90 degrees. My new fridge 3/8" line requires a 180 degree bend to reverse direction in a 3" space leading to the flare connection.

Wondering how close together you can put two 90's using the tool? That's where the salt method might be better.
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Old 05-27-2021, 12:23 PM   #24
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Agree that sand is not ideal but salt seems like it would be easy enough to empty and then flush with water to dissolve remaining crystals.

The HD/Husky bending tool looks good for up to 90 degrees. My new fridge 3/8" line requires a 180 degree bend to reverse direction in a 3" space leading to the flare connection.

Wondering how close together you can put two 90's using the tool? That's where the salt method might be better.
I can't figure out why you would insist on re-inventing the wheel and want to contaminate the interior of the tubing? Why overthink a simple task? Copper is easily bent with a bender. Contaminants in the system will lead to nothing but trouble. Salt is no better than sand in a propane orifice. Further, most gradual bends are easily done by hand, this allows you to snake the tube along and follow the frame, or make small alignment corrections. The bender is used for short radius 90s. New tubing, that comes in a roll, is very soft. It comes in lots of wall thicknesses. Some, like commonly found at big box stores is very thin and easier to kink than the slightly thicker type. BTW, if you are using the word "tubing", you are discussing the OD, if you use the word "pipe", you are discussing the ID. Look at the link I posted of the Gas-Tec tubing. I doubt you can do better than that. Determine the maximum amount of BTUs going through the tube and look up the size needed on a gas pipe sizing chart.
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Old 05-27-2021, 05:54 PM   #25
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I can't figure out why you would insist on re-inventing the wheel and want to contaminate the interior of the tubing? Why overthink a simple task? Copper is easily bent with a bender. Contaminants in the system will lead to nothing but trouble. Salt is no better than sand in a propane orifice. Further, most gradual bends are easily done by hand, this allows you to snake the tube along and follow the frame, or make small alignment corrections. The bender is used for short radius 90s. New tubing, that comes in a roll, is very soft. It comes in lots of wall thicknesses. Some, like commonly found at big box stores is very thin and easier to kink than the slightly thicker type. BTW, if you are using the word "tubing", you are discussing the OD, if you use the word "pipe", you are discussing the ID. Look at the link I posted of the Gas-Tec tubing. I doubt you can do better than that. Determine the maximum amount of BTUs going through the tube and look up the size needed on a gas pipe sizing chart.
Ok Raspy. Point made. I'll buy a tubing bender. Thanks, Mique
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Old 05-27-2021, 06:56 PM   #26
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Ok Raspy. Point made. I'll buy a tubing bender. Thanks, Mique
Don’t give in ,you’ll only encourage him !
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Old 05-27-2021, 07:28 PM   #27
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Don’t give in ,you’ll only encourage him !


OK, I'll back off.
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Old 05-27-2021, 07:56 PM   #28
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There are 90 degree and 45 degree flare fittings and very short flare connectors, less than 2" long that I have used when necessary. Just more connections though. I own 4 different tubing bending tools, one of them is a set of what looks like tight coil springs. You slide the correct size over the tubing and make your bend by hand and the "spring" keeps the tubing from kinking. Haven't used them in a long time and don't know if they are still available. Should we recommend that the OP buy a manometer to check for leaks, just to add more confusion.
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Old 05-27-2021, 08:50 PM   #29
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Should we recommend that the OP buy a manometer to check for leaks, just to add more confusion.
Soapy water is so much quicker and easier.
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Old 05-27-2021, 10:23 PM   #30
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I sure wouldnt be putting sand inside the tubing to bend it. Get one of thesehttps://www.zoro.com/ridgid-tubing-bender-38-in-od-13-in-l-36097/i/G2769602/?gclid=c488783f41e512064e7e188f2eeb1c5a&gclsrc=3p. ds&msclkid=c488783f41e512064e7e188f2eeb1c5a&utm_so urce=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=PLA_US_Bing_ SSC&utm_term=4586131721644290&utm_content=All%20Pr oducts and it will bend the tubing just fine without kinking it. At work we would get rolls of copper tubing and would cut a piece annd stretch it just enough to straighten it out and we used brass compression fittings to splice it. After it was installed we would pressure test it and then put it into service. Never had any problems with unions leaking.
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Old 05-28-2021, 11:15 AM   #31
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I am an instrumentation tech. In my industry 316 stainless tubing is the norm, up to hundreds or even thousands of psi. It can be bent, with a tubing bender, but I have never seen flare fittings. Mostly I have seen Swagelock® fittings. These use a ferrule that gets crimped onto the tubing when the fitting is tightened down.

I have considered using this instead of copper. Other than it is too expensive, any thoughts?
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Old 05-28-2021, 11:22 AM   #32
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I am an instrumentation tech. In my industry 316 stainless tubing is the norm, up to hundreds or even thousands of psi. It can be bent, with a tubing bender, but I have never seen flare fittings. Mostly I have seen Swadgelock® fittings. These use a ferrule that gets crimped onto the tubing when the fitting is tightened down.

I have considered using this instead of copper. Other than it is too expensive, any thoughts?
operating pressure of the trailer propane system is 11 water column inches, thats about 0.4 psi. not exactly high pressure.
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Old 05-28-2021, 11:35 AM   #33
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operating pressure of the trailer propane system is 11 water column inches, thats about 0.4 psi. not exactly high pressure.
I know that it is overkill. I am just looking for the longevity of stainless steel.

I have been playing with a thought experment of a 100 year trailer.
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Old 05-28-2021, 11:41 AM   #34
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If you are an instrument tech running tubing should be pretty easy for you and you probably have tubing benders. Stainless tubing would sure look nice, a whole lot nicer than the way the trailer manufaturers cobb the copper tubing in to the trailers. I have run a lot of tubing myself and for Stainless steel tubing a nice set od Swageloc roller benders can't be beat.
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Old 05-28-2021, 01:19 PM   #35
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Benders work. Thinking of the Scamp 13 and other campers I have seen the main line runs along with T flare fittings to branch off to each appliance. From my own work or observed one can bend a 180 into tubing with a tube bender.

Each appliance then has a connection at the T and one at the appliance. Nothing in between. I used plastic hose split lengthwise as a protection from rubbing when I mounted a gas line under a school bus camper. Ran along the frame. clamped but not so tight there wasn't any give. Bus flexes a lot in 25 ft. My Scamp the line is laying loose not clamped as far as I have seen. Inside not underneath. However that arrangement may have changed over the years in favor of having it outside. Don't know.

A bit of patience can be required to get the curve tight enough but not so tight it kinks and yet still able to fit in the available space. Nice thing about the main line and T approach is one is working with a shorter piece to make the more intricate bends. Less likely to end up with a big piece of scrap if the piece only has to go from bottom of the wall out to the appliance.

Yes I just said you make less big pieces of scrap if you only work with smaller pieces. Most of you can figure out how I know this without me having to talk about painful experiences.
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Old 05-28-2021, 01:41 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
I am an instrumentation tech. In my industry 316 stainless tubing is the norm, up to hundreds or even thousands of psi. It can be bent, with a tubing bender, but I have never seen flare fittings. Mostly I have seen Swadgelock® fittings. These use a ferrule that gets crimped onto the tubing when the fitting is tightened down.

I have considered using this instead of copper. Other than it is too expensive, any thoughts?
Swagelok is certainly a very good system, but it is overkill for sure.

Flaring stainless is not the same as flaring copper because stainless is not malleable like copper. And it work hardens. If you use stainless, you should probably use the Swagelock fittings.

I've seen a number of trailers with simple 1/2" schedule 40 black iron threaded pipe used for the gas line. The advantage there is it is durable, cheap and large in diameter, so it works well with the heater, and resists road damage.

My Black Series has rubber tubing, with brass TEEs for each drop. It is very easy to snake around as needed.
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Old 05-29-2021, 06:13 PM   #37
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tight bending update

Reporting good results in bending 3/8" copper tubing using the inexpensive tool from HD. I was able to produce a 180 degree return with 3" center-to-center by cheating two 90s close as possible together. Removing the tube from the tool after the second bend was tricky but it worked. Minor deformations in the copper but no crimps. Thanks to all for the advice to go conventional.

Progress photos attached. Sorry about the upside down image.
If anyone knows how to rotate photos in a post, please advise.
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_6366.jpg   IMG_6372.jpg  

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Old 05-29-2021, 06:44 PM   #38
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Those benders work well. I have one also.

Here is a tube sizing chart for BTU delivery that might come in handy. Look at Table 3. Total up all of your burners, and make sure you have a large enough tube for at least the first section before the first drop.

https://www.gasequipment.com/pdfs/P_...bingPoster.pdf
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Old 06-02-2021, 11:02 AM   #39
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There are 2 main thicknesses of copper tubing and apparently the thinner one is used for gas and the thicker one is used for water. I went for the thicker tube for my gas lines. The flaring tool is a bit weird to get used to but works great once you get the hang of it.


There is also 2 main flare angles so make sure your fittings match the flare you put in the tube or it won't seal properly. There's one that's meant for gas I just can't remember what it is...

Use teflon tape on gas fittings that don't have a flare connector, and make sure it's the yellow stuff. The white teflon tape is for pneumatic and water lines.

Buy a tube bender that can do a 180 degree bend. The one in "Mique's" pic is the Amazon one and can only do 90's. I had to make some pretty tight bends to install a new gas valve in my Boler. The first bender I ordered off Amazon can only bend 90 degrees, I found another cheap one at Canadian Tire that can do 180's.


Test your fittings with soap and water, test them regularly. Don't test them with an open flame or you might lose your eye brows.
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Old 06-02-2021, 11:10 AM   #40
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Propane in a trailer

when you are all done, install a gas detector. All RV's that use propane inside should have one installed.
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