everything shakes loose - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV
Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-08-2018, 12:11 PM   #61
Senior Member
 
Name: T
Trailer: Designing and building
Florida
Posts: 131
We had a similar problem, brought on by our freakin'lite (600lb. loaded) teardrop.

Multi-step answer for us:
Lowered running pressure in steps to 15psi - better, but the tire was still too stiff, despite the air pressure being functionally too low.
Switched from bias 5.30x12 to radial 145R15 at 20psi - HUGE improvement.

Depending on overall load, automotive tires may give better performance, based on conversations with Kenda technician at trade shows.

I don't know your trailer overall weight, but I might suggest heading to a slightly wider tire and lowering the pressure. Googling "adjusting tire pressure for larger tires" gives some good results, with the best conversation at BobIsTheOilGuy as usual....

Set your tire pressure using either the "chalk" or "wet footprint" method to get the best balance, and hand-check inflation by checking tread temperature vs. sidewall temperature - by hand. Neither should be hotter than the other, nor too hot to hold your hand on.
Thomcat316 is offline  
Old 09-08-2018, 12:28 PM   #62
Junior Member
 
Name: Scott
Trailer: Scamp
Connecticut
Posts: 9
Tires

Have the tire and wheel assembly balanced. On open roads that will combat some of the shaking. From the factory they do not balance the wheels, saving money.
Shaggy is offline  
Old 09-08-2018, 01:04 PM   #63
Senior Member
 
Name: Stephen
Trailer: Casita
Tennessee
Posts: 176
Exclamation Solution to "Everything Shakes Loose"

Your problem is common to all small travel trailers built in the USA and Canada. The brutal truth is, they are adequate for lumbering down paved highways and little else because boondocking stresses exceed their strength capabilities to the point of self-destruction.

Specifically, the frame flexes while traversing uneven roads which, when transmitted to the shell, stresses it to failure over time, usually first noted in popped rivets and opened seams. Everything about the axle is inadequate for boondocking: bearings, shocks, brakes and total load capacity. Further, the shell transmits the torsional loads to the entire internal structure which will work loose over time. The conventional hitch is also inadequate.

Your past experience is testimony that your Scamp is not strong enough for the loads your lifestyle imposes on it. You ignore this eloquent warning at your peril. To expose your family to the danger of deficient trailer construction on the major trip you contemplate would be irresponsible. These solutions are possible:

1. Replace the Scamp with an Australian camper designed for boondocking from the ground up.
2. Replace the Scamp with a Casita that has been modified for boondocking like this one. https://youtu.be/zkfaMf4JCUg
3. Hire a specialty shop to design, build and install an entirely new frame/axle subassembly that is strong enough to withstand boondocking loads without transmitting them to the shell. Firms that build truck chassis can do this work. Texas Customs is an example.
Stephen_Albers is offline  
Old 09-08-2018, 02:35 PM   #64
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 9,906
Registry
Like this?
This Scamp 5th Wheel Trailer Is A Boondocker's Dream
Jon in AZ is online now  
Old 09-08-2018, 04:12 PM   #65
Senior Member
 
Name: Mitzi
Trailer: LilSnoozy 12/01/16, Tug 2012 Dodge Citadel
Florida
Posts: 556
I picked up my lil snoozy 12/01/16. There was some difficulty learning to not sway on lane changesetc. Plus most state parks in FL are shellrock and they are very much washboarded.

My response to finding that all the interior doors had popped open and vomited their contents inside was to buy command strips(?) the Velcro strips that have different amounts that it will resist. I got soke of the heaviest duty I could fine. All cabinets, doors and drawers have their command strips stuck in their footprints. No more problem.
__________________
That's my job. I read...and I know things
Mitzi Agnew-Giles is offline  
Old 09-08-2018, 05:18 PM   #66
Senior Member
 
Name: Stephen
Trailer: Casita
Tennessee
Posts: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
While campers built on a truck frame are infinitely stronger than the average camper, their capability is limited because of size and ground clearance. For example, they are too big for exploring narrow or crowded city streets and ground clearance stops them on even typical forest service roads like these:
https://youtu.be/4l55msIiNBI

Forget about true off-road like the Aussies do. Ideally, dropping accommodation and downsizing for local exploration provides ultimate flexibility so valuable for remote operations and only obtainable in separate high rise axle camper tow vehicle configurations.
Stephen_Albers is offline  
Old 09-08-2018, 05:39 PM   #67
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 4,578
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephen_Albers View Post
Your problem is common to all small travel trailers built in the USA and Canada. ...
I just don't just understand why trailers are not built to travel on trails.
gordon2 is offline  
Old 09-08-2018, 06:21 PM   #68
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B 2020 Toyota Highlander XLE
British Columbia
Posts: 7,495
Quote:
Originally Posted by gordon2 View Post
I just don't just understand why trailers are not built to travel on trails.

Maybe it's an exercise in futility.
__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is online now  
Old 09-09-2018, 03:20 AM   #69
Senior Member
 
Name: Stephen
Trailer: Casita
Tennessee
Posts: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by gordon2 View Post
I just don't just understand why trailers are not built to travel on trails.
You know the old saying, "We have met the enemy and the enemy is US." Manufacturers are VERY cost conscious because the average customer buys on upfront price. I've surveyed the industry, to included even transport trailers and found this to be true almost universally. They have no concern for end users. They only want to get the unit out the door. It is well known the RV industry output is riddled with defects that the manufacturers transfer to dealers to fix if consumers ever detect them, which many don't.

The solution is another saw, "Caveat Emptor." For new buyers, a good plan before putting down any money is to rent the trailer for a weekend and run it down a logging road at speed for a couple hundred miles and see what is left.
Any dealer who will not rent should be avoided. Vote with your feet.
Stephen_Albers is offline  
Old 09-09-2018, 07:25 AM   #70
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 9,906
Registry
Stephen, the OP is not talking about rock crawling, but unpaved back roads, and particularly the Al-Can highway. The customized Scamp I linked was designed for those conditions- and more. Of course, it was a custom build, but it demonstrates what is possible and has some good ideas. The important upgrades were a heavy-duty frame, independent Timbren suspension, and interior cabinetry bonded to the shell. Those could be some things for the OP to think about long-term.

But in fact, many off-the-shelf molded trailers (including economy-grade Scamps) have made the trek to the Last Frontier. It's not a trip for garage queens, but it can be done without expedition-grade equipment. There will likely be bumps and bruises, and possibly some inconveniences and delays. You'll need to be prepared for on-the-fly repairs. That's part of the adventure of the Al-Can.

Some things you can anticipate. Rock chips in the gelcoat are the main hazard, and there are products to prevent that, both permanent and removable. Some failed fasteners are likely, so carry spares and bring a tool kit with a rivet gun. Complete shell failure... not a likely scenario. Cabinet hardware can be upgraded, or just swap screws for bolts and nylock nuts. Learn to pack trailer contents to eliminate shifting and banging.

A frame failure is certainly possible on an older Scamp- something to check carefully before leaving, along with the axle condition. Newer Scamps- including the OP's '06- have stouter frames, but consider painting or undercoating the bottom (the factory frame paint is budget quality). While you're under the trailer, add some protection for exposed plumbing.

It'll be hard on tires, so upgrade to good load range D's, bring an extra unmounted spare, a plug kit, and a compressor. You might be able to fit 14's without an axle change, not sure. 15's would be ideal because they're commonly stocked everywhere, but they'll require an axle swap. Speaking of tires, make sure your tug has a real spare, not a donut. I've heard even some trucks now come with temporary use spares.

Bring spare fuses, 12V wire and connectors, and a multi-tester. Check the integrity of the LP system before you leave and have all safety detectors installed and tested with fresh batteries. Service the bearings. Common sense, really.

And enjoy the adventure!

Otherwise, sign up for a cruise.
Jon in AZ is online now  
Old 09-09-2018, 08:22 AM   #71
Senior Member
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: Sprinter 'til I buy
Denver, CO
Posts: 944
Please understand, I am not saying Olivers are built for trails that would challenge a mountain bike. Not at all.

I would point out Olivers as an example of trailers built with superior finish and quality. While they have found their niche, Olivers clearly aren't for everyone, and a big reason is cost/price. Some wouldn't choose them at half the price.

If a manufacturer built trailers tough enough for back roads, they'd cost a lot, and the company would likely be plagued by warranty claims.

As others have mentioned, consumers are very price sensitive, even if they can afford Olivers. I think I'd love one, but it's not in the budget. Same with a Bigfoot.

Many consumers knowingly buy "disposable" RVs. Not this group.
Tom 72 is offline  
Old 09-09-2018, 11:51 AM   #72
Junior Member
 
Name: Mindy
Trailer: 13’ Boler
Ontario
Posts: 17
Awesome except carpet? And I love the old furnace cover! .... talking about the Scamp Boondocking info.
Gmindy is offline  
Old 09-09-2018, 01:03 PM   #73
Senior Member
 
rbryan's Avatar
 
Name: Robert
Trailer: 2015 Escape 19 "Past Tents" 2018 F150 Lariat 2.7L EB SuperCrew
Arkansas
Posts: 1,298
Registry
For what it's worth: we have traveled on a few very rough washboard roads with no ill effect on our Escape 19. But, I take two precautions. One, lower the tire pressure, as others have suggested; and two, think of how slow you need to go, and then go much slower than that. Really, just slow way way down. For us in one or two cases that mean 5 mph or even less. Makes a difference between having everything tossed about or getting there in one piece.
__________________
"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy an RV. And that is pretty close."
rbryan is offline  
Old 09-09-2018, 02:54 PM   #74
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 3,504
Registry
FWIW a friend of mine bought a new stick trailer at Camping World. On the way home (30 freeway miles) one of the cabinet doors BROKE off!
thrifty bill is offline  
Old 09-09-2018, 08:12 PM   #75
Junior Member
 
Name: Alex
Trailer: Casita Spirit Deluxe
Florida
Posts: 20
OMW

I got a softer ride in my Casita with the shock absorber kit from orbital machine works. Dunno if the Scamp is a fit but worth a call
Alex Segal is offline  
Old 09-09-2018, 10:41 PM   #76
Member
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: Boler
Alberta
Posts: 43
Also, one other thing that helped is to make sure I had enough weight forward of the axle.
Yellow Boler is offline  
Old 09-09-2018, 11:04 PM   #77
Member
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: Boler
Alberta
Posts: 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
If that "recommended manufacturer tire pressure" came from Boler, it was based on different bias-ply trailer tires in use 40 years ago.

Whether or not to use the full sidewall pressure or to reduce pressure according to the actual load is very controversial here. But if you do run a lower pressure, (1) make sure you're using a current load-inflation chart from the manufacturer of your tire, and (2) make sure to leave a margin to account for variations in loading and unequal left-right balance.
Vehicle manufacturer's base their recommended tire pressure based on the weight of the vehicle for best tire wear, performance and safety. I don't think it matters very much whether the tire is radial or bias ply as to the recommended pressure. My Jeep liberty is way heavier than my trailer and the recommended tire pressure is only 35 lbs. The trailer is lighter and it makes sense it would need a smaller tire pressure. Comparatively, a semi trailer is very heavy and uses a tire pressure of about 100 lbs. Using the recommended tire pressure increases safety because you have a larger contact patch, so better braking and other performance. As you add more tire pressure your contact patch gets smaller. For better fuel economy many add 2-3 psi above manufacturer recommendations.

My new tires are actually a heavier side load rating than I actually need, which makes them stiffer, but they are working great. And they should be tougher.
Yellow Boler is offline  
Old 09-10-2018, 05:43 AM   #78
Senior Member
 
Name: Stephen
Trailer: Casita
Tennessee
Posts: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrifty bill View Post
FWIW a friend of mine bought a new stick trailer at Camping World. On the way home (30 freeway miles) one of the cabinet doors BROKE off!
An excellent example of, built to price, not function construction. A similar story is of a new owner driving his purchase home found no water in the fresh water tank because a rock had punctured it during the drive. Unprotected tankage is a common flaw. And, while the upfront cost is low, the operational costs go through the roof along with the downtime. And downtime denies the owner use which is what he bought it for in the first place.

These travesties will not go away until the consumer demands a better product.
Stephen_Albers is offline  
Old 09-10-2018, 05:48 AM   #79
Senior Member
 
Name: Stephen
Trailer: Casita
Tennessee
Posts: 176
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Segal View Post
I got a softer ride in my Casita with the shock absorber kit from orbital machine works. Dunno if the Scamp is a fit but worth a call
Quite right. Shock absorbers can help stability a lot in most suspension configurations. The absence of shock absorbers in the suspension is another example of built to price rather than built for use construction.
Stephen_Albers is offline  
Old 09-10-2018, 06:45 AM   #80
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 9,906
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow Boler View Post
Vehicle manufacturer's base their recommended tire pressure based on the weight of the vehicle for best tire wear, performance and safety. I don't think it matters very much whether the tire is radial or bias ply as to the recommended pressure. My Jeep liberty is way heavier than my trailer and the recommended tire pressure is only 35 lbs. The trailer is lighter and it makes sense it would need less...
My 2008 13' Scamp has a sticker that recommends 50 psi. That just happens to be the maximum sidewall pressure for the load range C radial ST tires they supply as OEM.

According to the tire manufacturer, they will carry a maximum load of 1360# per tire or 2720# per axle. The heaviest Scamp 13's don't even come close to that. So, at least one manufacturer does not base their recommendation on weight.

Early Scamps and Bolers recommended 26 psi and I assumed that was because they used different tires back then. I could be wrong about why they changed their recommendation. Weights do tend to be a bit heavier now due to design changes and longer option lists, but not enough to account for the increase in recommended pressure on the basis of weight alone.

I have found in practice that running 40-42 psi gives a noticeably less bouncy ride on my basic, lightly optioned Scamp 13, while retaining a comfortable margin of safety on weight, according to load-inflation charts. I will admit there is nothing particularly scientific about my choice, except that for higher speed (62-65 mph) highway use in triple digit temperatures, I'd rather err on the side of overinflation. Obviously I tow in much different conditions than the OP.
Jon in AZ is online now  
Closed Thread


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Grandparent's Don't Know Everything Donna D. Jokes, Stories & Tall Tales 2 06-27-2009 09:42 PM
curse the water gods *shakes fist* Flygal Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 9 01-08-2009 09:59 AM
Do you and your spouse do EVERYTHING together? Frederick L. Simson Jokes, Stories & Tall Tales 4 05-06-2008 11:48 PM
help with everything cyndi H Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 14 10-02-2006 08:27 PM
So you think you know everything?? Christi V. Jokes, Stories & Tall Tales 0 09-23-2006 07:52 AM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.