Filling stripped holes and re-drilling? - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-06-2020, 11:00 AM   #1
Senior Member
 
ZachO's Avatar
 
Name: Zach
Trailer: 91 Bigfoot 17
Montana
Posts: 2,467
Registry
Filling stripped holes and re-drilling?

I’m sure there’s an obvious solution.

Click image for larger version

Name:	AA59230A-9C2A-4A74-816D-F85E809ADE73.jpg
Views:	18
Size:	159.5 KB
ID:	137287

I just replaced the piano hinge on my front window guard, and one of the latches has stripped screw holes. These holes line up with the hole in the rock guard, and are nicely symmetrical, so I’d like to keep them where they are.

What product can I use to fill them, then drill and use them again? I’ve tried the idea of stuffing match sticks or something in oversize holes and I don’t prefer it...

Thanks.
ZachO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 11:17 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Name: Nicolas
Trailer: 1978 Boler
Almonte, Ontario
Posts: 118
Stripped holes

If the awning is fibreglass, mix an epoxy (five minute) and fill the holes, cure and redrill. Another solution would be to use T-nuts with the gripping teeth flattened and the existing holes drilled out to accommodate.
Nicolas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 11:48 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Kenny Strong's Avatar
 
Name: kenny
Trailer: 93 "Lil" Bigfoot 13.5'
Utah
Posts: 364
what is behind the glass face ?
Kenny Strong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 11:50 AM   #4
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,772
When I had to reset the hinges on my Trillium, I used an epoxy paste called PC 11 and injected it into the holes. Worked well. Holes that go all the way through need to be backed. I used scrap sheet metal.

Click image for larger version

Name:	_20200906_134420.JPG
Views:	10
Size:	65.9 KB
ID:	137289Click image for larger version

Name:	_20200906_134456.JPG
Views:	10
Size:	37.5 KB
ID:	137290Click image for larger version

Name:	_20200906_134610.JPG
Views:	13
Size:	12.8 KB
ID:	137291
Raz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 11:54 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
ZachO's Avatar
 
Name: Zach
Trailer: 91 Bigfoot 17
Montana
Posts: 2,467
Registry
Alright, thanks!

Behind the fiberglass there's wood, which is great for good holding strength. Until it gets stripped...

These got stripped because the piano hinge had been failing for years, so the rock guard was sagging, resting more and more heavily on the latch, finally pushing it down and forcing the screws out.

Raz I'm guessing that syringe didn't come with the epoxy? I'll see what the local hardware store has.
ZachO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 12:13 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Kenny Strong's Avatar
 
Name: kenny
Trailer: 93 "Lil" Bigfoot 13.5'
Utah
Posts: 364
Use Raz's idea. then Nicolas's t nuts with the barbs into your existing wood backer.
Kenny Strong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 12:52 PM   #7
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,772
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZachO View Post
Alright, thanks!

Raz I'm guessing that syringe didn't come with the epoxy? I'll see what the local hardware store has.
No, the syringe was seperate but the hardware store should have them. Woodworkers use them for glue.
Raz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2020, 01:45 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
ZachO's Avatar
 
Name: Zach
Trailer: 91 Bigfoot 17
Montana
Posts: 2,467
Registry
Alright, thanks.

Hardware store is closed till Tuesday. I was hoping to do it today so it had time to cure before the cold front and rain/snow moves in, but it looks like I'll have to wait until after!
ZachO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 03:51 AM   #9
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,772
I thought the screws were held by the fiberglass. That was the case with my door. If the wood is what really holds the screws then if you have acess to the back, I would use bolts with a washer between the nut and the wood. If no access, I would drill the holes out and fill with a glued dowel. Be aware, many hardware store dowels are metric.
Raz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 07:23 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 3,083
Registry
Its all about what is behind the fiberglass. Chances are, the screws are not threaded into the fiberglass, they are threaded into whatever is under it (likely wood). Rotten wood is usually the culprit. Patching the fiberglass alone is not the solution.
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 08:26 AM   #11
Senior Member
 
ZachO's Avatar
 
Name: Zach
Trailer: 91 Bigfoot 17
Montana
Posts: 2,467
Registry
Yeah there's wood just behind the fiberglass. I don't have easy access to it from the inside, though. It would require taking the interior walls out. I don't have a completely clear picture of how Bigfoot constructed these, but there's a lot of wood. I don't think there's a full sheet of plywood behind all the fiberglass, completely boxing in the trailer, but there's a lot of wood framing all the windows, door etc. The screws for that latch are a couple inches long.

There may be some rotted wood, but it's the sagging rock guard that caused this issue. Probably as it enlarged those screws holes with all the pressure, some water started getting in there. But the latch on the other side is solid. Maybe dowels are the way to go.

I don't see t-nuts working here, since I'd like to keep the latch flush to the fiberglass, but they are exactly what I need for my upper fridge vent. Almost every one of those holes is stripped, and it's unfortunately an area I need to access fairly often, so they're only getting worse. Screws directly in wood aren't set up for repeated removal, so dowels wouldn't be great there. A metal threaded insert is perfect. But yes, for this latch, which hopefully I never need to remove again, dowels will be great.
ZachO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 09:27 AM   #12
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,772
There are some who would fill the holes with epoxy and thread the screws in and let the epoxy cure. The problem is if you ever have to remove those screws in the future you could end up with stripper heads, broken screws, ect. That's why I suggested the dowels. A glued dowel is as strong if not stronger than the original wood and if you use the correct size pilot holes, the screws will go in easy, and if the need be, come back out easy. And if the problem repeats, the dowels can easily be drilled out and replaced. Ever try to drill out a broken screw in wood?
Raz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 09:46 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
ZachO's Avatar
 
Name: Zach
Trailer: 91 Bigfoot 17
Montana
Posts: 2,467
Registry
I don't think I have. I've tried to dill out broken bolts in metal, but not a screw in wood. It doesn't sound like fun, or like it would even work without a lot damage to the wood around it...

No, I was going to inject epoxy and let it cure, then drill, like you had initially recommended. But I think the dowel idea is even better for this.
ZachO is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 09:52 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B 2020 Toyota Highlander XLE
British Columbia
Posts: 7,138
Take a look at Git-Rot as an alternative.
__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:30 AM   #15
Raz
Senior Member
 
Raz's Avatar
 
Name: Raz
Trailer: Trillium 2010
Vermont
Posts: 4,772
My trillium and I suspect other trailers use plywood spacers around the windows which unfortunately eventually rot. If thats the case here then there is no permanent fix without replacing plywood. If you think your wood is rotting then Glenn's suggestion could be a good temporary fix until some future date when you've got the time. Like when Covid 23 arrives.


https://www.boatlife.com/news/how-to...o-use-git-rot/
Raz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:32 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Kenny Strong's Avatar
 
Name: kenny
Trailer: 93 "Lil" Bigfoot 13.5'
Utah
Posts: 364
I like the threaded insert you talked about. If a threaded insert has a screw with a nut stopping it from turning into the insert is turned into the hole with the glue already placed in the opening it can set up in the glue. the screw and the stop nut can be waxed to keep the glue from adhering to the screw threads.
put a wrench on the stop nut to brake the bond, unscrew the screw.
Kenny Strong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 01:06 PM   #17
Member
 
Name: Martin
Trailer: 1993 CASITA 16SD
Texas
Posts: 59
White JBWeld has worked for me in the past.
CASITA BANANA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 02:31 PM   #18
Senior Member
 
Name: Nicolas
Trailer: 1978 Boler
Almonte, Ontario
Posts: 118
Ahhh! Kenny B beat me to the waxed bolt suggestion. This is suggested for implanting bolts into fibreglass and epoxied holes in wood. Jus make sure that you wax and then lightly twist the wax into the threads. Did this by mistake with a thick layer of wax and the bolt was too loose afterward.
Nicolas is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 02:38 PM   #19
Junior Member
 
Name: Steve
Trailer: Casita
Oregon
Posts: 4
Wood dowels work well

Quote:
Originally Posted by Raz View Post
There are some who would fill the holes with epoxy and thread the screws in and let the epoxy cure. The problem is if you ever have to remove those screws in the future you could end up with stripper heads, broken screws, ect. That's why I suggested the dowels. A glued dowel is as strong if not stronger than the original wood and if you use the correct size pilot holes, the screws will go in easy, and if the need be, come back out easy. And if the problem repeats, the dowels can easily be drilled out and replaced. Ever try to drill out a broken screw in wood?
Agree with your method. Ive done this many time restoring old houses with stripped door/cabinet hinge screws . Sometimes ill pilot out the hole to match the dowel.
Galoolie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2020, 12:02 PM   #20
Junior Member
 
Name: Lance
Trailer: Lil Bigfoot 1988 B13.5
Alberta
Posts: 22
For my front window cover I replaced all the screws with rivnuts and bolts. A much more secure mount.
Drtriumph is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Filling metal holes morgynm Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 17 05-30-2016 06:59 AM
Filling Screw and other small holes in fiberglass frankcfx Modifications, Alterations and Updates 13 02-22-2016 09:09 AM
Solar Panel Installation - no drilling holes carlkeigley Modifications, Alterations and Updates 39 09-13-2013 03:42 PM
Tips for Drilling Holes in Fiberglass Lil M. Modifications, Alterations and Updates 33 08-17-2012 05:46 AM
Stripped Screw Holes Quint362 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 15 03-12-2012 08:19 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:28 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.