Keeping dust out of trailer on gravel roads - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-27-2019, 11:25 AM   #1
Member
 
Name: Beth
Trailer: Parkliner
Maryland
Posts: 37
Keeping dust out of trailer on gravel roads

Hi there,
We are preparing for an Arctic Circle trip this summer covering both the Dempster Highway and the Haul Road to Prudeau Bay. Both gravel roads.
We will be pulling our Parkliner and read somewhere that if you crack a vent inside the trailer it creates a pressure draw so no dust gets in. Does this make sense?
We are conserned about road dust and dirt coming in all the vents.
Anybody have any tips?

Thanks,
Ross and Beth
__________________

Doggonehappy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2019, 01:28 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Raspy's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: Black Series HQ19 on order
Smith Valley, Nevada
Posts: 1,822
I don't know of any vents that can be opened that won't either cause a vacuum that allows dust in, or just scoop it in right there.

One way I have heard about is to put a fan on a vent and force air in to pressurize the trailer, and have all of the air going to the fan, go through an air filter. This way you get filtered air and a slightly pressurized trailer. Air leaks out of any holes, instead of air and dust leaking in.
__________________

__________________
I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt.
Raspy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2019, 07:40 PM   #3
Member
 
Name: Beth
Trailer: Parkliner
Maryland
Posts: 37
Thanks Raspy. That makes sense. I will think about that. Iím guessing that dust through the vents is not a big problem since not much response. Thatís a good thing.
Doggonehappy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2019, 08:10 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Name: Jack L
Trailer: Sold the Bigfoot 17-Looking for a new one
Washington
Posts: 1,468
In 1987 I drove the Haul Road to the Arctic Circle. It may be different today, but back then, the "dust" thrown up by tractor trailers going the opposite direction consisted of rocks the size, shape and color of cantaloupe. The road was very wide and the trucks went extremely fast. The truckers seemed to take great sport in making it as difficult on tourists as humanly possible.

Many vehicles, especially class A motor homes had a framework of metal pipe covered with wire mesh to prevent the bigger rocks from hitting the very large and expensive windshield. For sure' if I was doing this trip, I would protect the radiator and headlights with some sort of screen guard and I would protect the front of the trailer from stone damage.

I did have a very large rock the size of a cantaloupe land smack dab in the center of the hood of the Ford Taurus I had rented, but surprisingly, there was no damage.

If I ever get back to Alaska again I would not try this again. The scenery was less han exciting. Things may be different today.
Jack L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2019, 08:31 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Name: Jack L
Trailer: Sold the Bigfoot 17-Looking for a new one
Washington
Posts: 1,468
As an afterthought, and noticing you live in Maryland, if you are not already in Alaska, or at least close to Alaska now, you need to consider that by the time you get there, summer will be almost over.

If I do a trailer trip to Alaska in the next few years, and I hope I do, I would plan on arriving in Alaska the end of May and departing the end of August. 3 months is not anywhere long enough to see everything, but Alaska summer starts Memorial day and ends Labor day. Before or after that. the weather can be poor. It is a great trip, but having plenty of time to see and do everything you want to do is critical.
Jack L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2019, 09:04 PM   #6
Member
 
Name: Beth
Trailer: Parkliner
Maryland
Posts: 37
Thanks for all the advise and experience sharing Jack. We are leaving MD in about a week, doing the fall end rather than the spring. Itís a bucket list trip for my husband, who has been there many times but mostly flying in small planes for work. I really donít want to wreck our sweet trailer or be jostled to death so he may leave me and the trailer in a campground while he travels the gravel roads of the Dempster and the Dalton.
Doggonehappy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2019, 11:31 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: K C
Trailer: 1971 Trailswest Campster
Washington
Posts: 2,703
Take along a portable vacuum cleaner that has a cyclone type of suction action and keep on top of things. It can be a rechargeable one, there are some strong ones around nowadays. The ones with washable filters make sense and make sure it does not need bags.



The place the dust could become a problem is it getting inside of the fridge and water heater vents and the heater exhaust as well. So be sure to open them and frequently vacuum in those areas as well as cleaning the living space. You can get one of the micro cleaning accessory kits for the vacuum, it has small tubes and brushes that will fit into little areas.


Put "dust covers" on the cushions, then you can take them outside to shake them off instead of having the dust penetrate into the cushion fabric and on into the foam as well.

If you have trouble with dust getting into the drawers and cabinets then you need to install some thin, soft foam weather stripping on the inside edges of the doors and drawer fronts to seal out the dust.

Also be sure to take along a couple of extra air filters for the car engine as well as the cabin filter for the cars interior blower. But them from an auto parts store or the car dealer while you are still passing through major metropolitan areas or order them from online before you leave on your trip.
k corbin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2019, 04:16 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
charlsara's Avatar
 
Name: Charlie
Trailer: 2014 Lil Snoozy
North Carolina
Posts: 636
Registry
Keeping dust out of trailer on gravel roads

A friend of mine made several trips to Alaska during the 70ís and 80ís.He camped in the back of a pickup truck with a homemade camper cover. He mounted a car air filter with a heater fan blowing through it. That kept it pressurized enough to keep the dust out. It worked well. He still has the vehicle.
charlsara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2019, 04:25 PM   #9
Senior Member
 
charlsara's Avatar
 
Name: Charlie
Trailer: 2014 Lil Snoozy
North Carolina
Posts: 636
Registry
Here it isClick image for larger version

Name:	IMG_0070.jpg
Views:	58
Size:	262.1 KB
ID:	130642
charlsara is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2019, 08:54 PM   #10
Member
 
Name: Beth
Trailer: Parkliner
Maryland
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by k corbin View Post
Take along a portable vacuum cleaner that has a cyclone type of suction action and keep on top of things. It can be a rechargeable one, there are some strong ones around nowadays. The ones with washable filters make sense and make sure it does not need bags.



The place the dust could become a problem is it getting inside of the fridge and water heater vents and the heater exhaust as well. So be sure to open them and frequently vacuum in those areas as well as cleaning the living space. You can get one of the micro cleaning accessory kits for the vacuum, it has small tubes and brushes that will fit into little areas.


Put "dust covers" on the cushions, then you can take them outside to shake them off instead of having the dust penetrate into the cushion fabric and on into the foam as well.

If you have trouble with dust getting into the drawers and cabinets then you need to install some thin, soft foam weather stripping on the inside edges of the doors and drawer fronts to seal out the dust.

Also be sure to take along a couple of extra air filters for the car engine as well as the cabin filter for the cars interior blower. But them from an auto parts store or the car dealer while you are still passing through major metropolitan areas or order them from online before you leave on your trip.


Thank you. Great ideas!
Doggonehappy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2019, 08:56 PM   #11
Member
 
Name: Beth
Trailer: Parkliner
Maryland
Posts: 37
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlsara View Post


Now THAT is original and truly so cool. Great pic! Thanks for sharing.
Doggonehappy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 06:43 AM   #12
Member
 
TZBrown's Avatar
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: Escape 21 and Northern Lite truck camper 2014 2500 HD Duramax
Michigan
Posts: 43
We went there in July 2015, the road to Deadhorse was very good.

That being said there were some days that were dusty and others that were muddy.

We spent a month just in Alaska and drove every road that could be driven without a ferry ride. It was a great trip and we will do it again soon.

Don't sweat the dust or the mud, it can all be cleaned up after, go and enjoy the adventure

Link to our trip album
https://www.flickr.com/photos/568443...57661434359175
__________________
Life's A Journey: It's not to arrive safely at the grave in a well preserved body, But rather to skid in sideways, totally worn out, shouting, Woo Hoo!....What a Ride!
https://www.flickr.com/photos/56844387@N04/albums
https://www.youtube.com/user/TZBrown01/videos
TZBrown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 07:35 AM   #13
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 2,595
Registry
I would be much more concerned about gravel and rocks damaging your FG trailer. Dirt cleans up relatively easily.

Personally, I would either leave the trailer in Fairbanks or Coldfoot and then drive the rest of the way with your TV.

On the trip up, the Alcan itself was in remarkably good condition last August, but it can change every year.


Don't feel like you have to pack everything in Alaska into this one trip. I've been there five times, and I will probably go back again.
thrifty bill is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 08:37 AM   #14
Senior Member
 
Name: Francois
Trailer: Bigfoot
British Columbia
Posts: 1,157
Registry
dust....

IME what you really have to guard against is dust entering the trailer through poorly sealed openings (vents, access panels or windows) on the REAR FACE of the trailer (where negative air pressure occurs while you are driving down the road)
In my case there is a large window at the back that doubles as an emergency exit (does not seal well at all because of that)....so if I'm going to drive on a logging road I'll tape up where the window meets the frame


the dust that comes in the fridge vent or heater vent (on the sides of trailer) and lays there does not affect the operation of either and can get cleaned up at the end of the trip or season
Attached Thumbnails
btca.jpg  
Franswa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2019, 09:54 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
David B.'s Avatar
 
Name: Dave & Paula Brown
Trailer: Lil Snoozy
Arizona
Posts: 2,152
Registry
We did the trip last year (spent 3 monthe there) and had no problem with dust entering our Lil Snoozy, nor did we need to replace any air filters on the tow vehicle. You should tape some yoga mats or similar protection to the front of your Parkliner to protect from the many rocks that end up hitting the front.
Happy Trails
Dave & Paula
David B. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2019, 11:14 AM   #16
Member
 
Name: Beth
Trailer: Parkliner
Maryland
Posts: 37
Keeping dust out of trailer on gravel roads

Thank you David. May husband is doing that right now
Doggonehappy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-01-2019, 11:16 AM   #17
Member
 
Name: Beth
Trailer: Parkliner
Maryland
Posts: 37
Thank you Franswa. We will tape the back window.
Doggonehappy1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 11:45 AM   #18
Junior Member
 
Name: Brooks
Trailer: Scamp
Alaska
Posts: 2
Towing a Trailer in Alaska

We recently towed our 13í Scamp to McCarthy, Alaska. This is a 60 mile gravel road similar to the Dalton Highway (haul road). Here is a list of damage to the Scamp.

Broken shower pan pump.
Broken grey water tank.
Three broken cabinet mounting bolts.
Front bathroom door separated from piano hinge.
Shredded tire/bent rim.
Missing trailer dump hose.

Our Scamp has made 11 round trips on the Alaska Highway and never had that much damage.

We have hunted the Dalton Highway many times and it is uniquely beautiful, but I would never tow our Scamp on that road.

Gravel roads are o.k. if you drive about 20 mph. But driving that slow on the Dalton will get you a lot of aggressive behavior from truck drivers.

Also, do not be North of Atigun Pass after September 1. See photo taken September 4, 2014.

Enjoy your trip, but leave the trailer in Fairbanks.
Attached Thumbnails
D7A1E874-4884-401F-A02E-7ACB8F45C403.jpg  
Brooks Wade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 12:41 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Name: Jack L
Trailer: Sold the Bigfoot 17-Looking for a new one
Washington
Posts: 1,468
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brooks Wade View Post
We recently towed our 13í Scamp to McCarthy, Alaska. This is a 60 mile gravel road similar to the Dalton Highway (haul road). Here is a list of damage to the Scamp.

Broken shower pan pump.
Broken grey water tank.
Three broken cabinet mounting bolts.
Front bathroom door separated from piano hinge.
Shredded tire/bent rim.
Missing trailer dump hose.

Our Scamp has made 11 round trips on the Alaska Highway and never had that much damage.

We have hunted the Dalton Highway many times and it is uniquely beautiful, but I would never tow our Scamp on that road.

Gravel roads are o.k. if you drive about 20 mph. But driving that slow on the Dalton will get you a lot of aggressive behavior from truck drivers.

Also, do not be North of Atigun Pass after September 1. See photo taken September 4, 2014.

Enjoy your trip, but leave the trailer in Fairbanks.

^^^^^^^^^ Follow Brooks advice!

For those of you that are considering a trailer trip to Alaska, there is a significant difference between the Alaska Highway (also called the Alcan) and the Haul road. The Alaska Highway is pretty tame and the Haul road is brutal.

I hope to visit Alaska in the next few years, but there is no way I would take a nice trailer up the Haul road. When I have my trailer in Alaska, I would be packing up and leaving by mid August.
Jack L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2019, 04:22 PM   #20
Junior Member
 
Name: Wendy
Trailer: shopping
California
Posts: 6
We drove the Haul Road to the Arctic Circle in 2016. Left our Casita in Fairbanks for a few days. The road is very rough. The truckers on the Haul Road drove like mad men. We pulled off the road whenever we saw one coming in the hopes they would not hit us or damage our vehicle. Quite frankly, they appeared ready to run over us. They do create great clouds of dust.
__________________

Westwell is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Scamp on Gravel Roads camper1887 Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 26 04-18-2012 09:12 PM
keeping the mice out Ricky 4 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 10 07-19-2008 10:44 AM
KEEPING OUT THE UNWANTED Robert Scallan Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 4 04-18-2007 05:47 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:28 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
×