Name this compound! - Fiberglass RV
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Old 12-18-2016, 07:11 PM   #1
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Name: Eric
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Name this compound!

I am installing the front dinette into a 2014 Trillium shell. All other internal structural fiberglass pieces (galley, closet, etc.) were previously installed by Trillium USA. The seams of those pieces were sealed by a thick compound I am not familiar with but I'm guessing it is some type of resin and hardener. This stuff was also used to build up areas behind the plywood window frames where the wood did not meet with fiberglass because of the curvature of the trailer shell. I would like to use the same stuff because it is extremely tough and does the job well. I would appreciate if anyone can identify from the attached photos and let me know.

Eric
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Old 12-18-2016, 07:27 PM   #2
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Looks like plastic filler. One of the many variations of Bondo.
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Old 12-18-2016, 08:18 PM   #3
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Thanks Steve. Bondo was my first thought too but I took a hammer to some really thick spots (approx 3/4") and that stuff didn't crack or chip off. I even tried to remove a spot with a chisel but the only thing that worked was grinding it down. I thought maybe it was some other compound specific to fiberglass I was unaware of. Guess I should have stuck with my first guess!
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Old 12-18-2016, 08:56 PM   #4
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It might be wood flour, Wood ground to the consistency of flour then mixed with epoxy. That's what holds our plywood kayaks together.
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Old 12-18-2016, 10:21 PM   #5
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guesses, Pollyester resin, JB Weld,
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Old 12-18-2016, 10:26 PM   #6
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Ah, that is an excellent guess. Thanks, I'll have to look into it.
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Old 12-18-2016, 10:39 PM   #7
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Name: Jack L
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I would check it a automotive paint and body shop supply store. There are numerous types of fillers available. If you want to stay with a product that is readily available at retail stores, Marine Tex is a product that is stronger than Bondo or JB Weld.
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Old 12-19-2016, 02:27 AM   #8
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I'm kind of surprised that none of our Trill experts haven't answered yet. Sounds like it's a pretty tough material.
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Old 12-19-2016, 10:30 AM   #9
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Looks like fiberglass & resin without the gel coat doesn't it. They have a lot of that around while making the FGRV.

Sent from my SM-N900T using Fiberglass RV mobile app
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Old 12-19-2016, 12:01 PM   #10
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Autobody filler and fiberglass preparations are similar products. They use a polystyrene base which is catalyzed to a solid by a hardener. When sanded they produce a fine dust with a distinctive hydrocarbon odor. Don't breathe this dust. It is very toxic. These products are comparable as they use the same base. Filler is easier to shape, fiberglass is stronger due to the glass fibers. Adhesion is the main concern. Surfaces must be free of grease, oil, corrosion etc. Roughing them up with sandpaper, grinder etc. improves adhesion.
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Old 12-19-2016, 12:20 PM   #11
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I've got a 2010. Same stuff. I agree, bondo. When I had a leaking belly band they sent me some.
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Old 12-19-2016, 12:26 PM   #12
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I used a product while building canoes from the West Systems called Fillet.
I belive it was just ground fiberglass like a powder and when mixed with the epoxy it could be used a filler or as a glue.
STRONG STUFF but I thing too expensive for any large project.
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Old 12-19-2016, 02:42 PM   #13
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With polyester resin you can use almost anything with it, medical Gauze, Screen wire, Sawdust, Fiberglass and fiberglass powder, Micro bubbles, Cloth.
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Old 12-19-2016, 06:21 PM   #14
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Name: Randy J.
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To beef up the fiberglass around the windows when replacing the frames on our '76 Trillium, I used polyester resin and the finest door screen I could find. Then a very thin layer of body-filler to smooth out the work. I don't like using fiberglass cloth as it makes me itch like crazy. Next time I'm going to try using polyester cloth. And yes, as someone suggested, be careful! Invest in an appropriate chemical mask when working with any two part compound and a good particulate mask for sanding. Don't leave things like cushions in the trailer when you are working and be fussy about cleanup. I wasn't always so careful, but as the saying goes, if I'd known I'd live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself!
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Old 12-20-2016, 04:19 AM   #15
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Looks like automotive bondo to me. The stuff is kind of an off white until you had the hardener which turns it that pinkish color.
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Old 12-20-2016, 05:47 AM   #16
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While anything can be used as a mesh with resin or Epoxy the strenght will very greatly for the finish product.
Chopped glass would be about the best choice, but that is ussually applied through a blower machine (brother worked making fiberglass showers years ago)
Polyester resins are very odiferous where the epoxy has almost no odor
I have built many canoes in the basement of the house using the West System with rolls of glass that again doesn't make you itch like that house insulation, I believe Randy is worried about, and it will cure clear not yellow.
The WEST SYSTEM can be baught at most marien and good camping suppy houses or through go on line to find suppliers in your area.
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Old 12-20-2016, 11:40 AM   #17
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I did develop my initial sensitivity to glass fibres I think using home insulation. But the cloth also causes me problems - the little fibres break off, especially during sanding. And you sure don't want them or the powdered resin dust in your lungs! I also apply a coat of resin and/or acrylic paint to any surface damaged or unfinished (hairy) fiberglass I find like inside cabinets during renovations. In the old days, I did patch some old canoes in a buddy's closed garage using resin etc. without much thought to skin or breathing protection or even proper ventilation. Sensitivities take time to develop, as do other health issues...
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Old 12-20-2016, 12:02 PM   #18
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Anybody that works with fiberglass should use a respirator of course but the way to get it off your skin when it starts to itch is take some wide masking tape and put over the affected areas and then peel it off. It will take those itchy fibers with it.
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Old 12-20-2016, 12:30 PM   #19
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The itching caused by fiberglass insulation is a mechanical irritation caused by the tiny fibers penetrating the surface of the skin. These fibers will also cause lung irritation if inhaled. If inhaled in sufficient quantity over time these fibers can cause fibrotic lung damage. The vapors released from fiberglass resins also irritate the lungs if inhaled and can cause sensitization, an asthma condition. These resins also irritate the skin upon contact. They can be skin absorbed causing an allergic reaction that worsens with each exposure. Exposure prevention is best. Coated tyvek coveralls are used to prevent skin contact. Use impermiable gloves to protect your hands. Be cautious as fiberglass resin will melt many glove materials. Proper ventilation and a respirator will prevent eye contact and inhalation. If you don't use a full facepiece respirator you will also need goggles. Safety glasses won't work. If it does contact your skin wash it off immediately with soap and plenty of warm running water. Information for respirator and glove selection is contained in the material safety data sheet which should be supplied with the product.
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Old 12-20-2016, 01:49 PM   #20
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Thanks for your input everyone. It has given me a lot to research and think about. I also appreciate all the comments regarding safety. I use tyvek suits, an organic solvent rated respirator and giggles while working with fiberglass and other stuff. The toxicity of this stuff can't be overstated. However, I believe my neighbors think I am cooking meth every time I walk into my portable shelter wearing all the protective gear as the trailer was brought home under the cover of darkness!
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