New Scamp, front window shield: do I need it? - Fiberglass RV
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Old 03-25-2021, 12:11 PM   #1
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Name: zack
Trailer: scamp 13
California
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New Scamp, front window shield: do I need it?

I got a new Scamp and it has a big, beautiful front window (no bathroom option). (see picture) When I am camping it is nice to enjoy that view out the front window, so I take the shield off. But the shield is really big and hard to store. So I wondering, would it be unwise to put it in storage and just drive with no shield? Typically I drive about 50 miles per week when I am camping, some of it on a two line highway at like 55 mph, and some on smaller windy roads at lower speeds. What do you think? Thanks very much.
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Old 03-25-2021, 12:24 PM   #2
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Name: Lisa
Trailer: 1992 Scamp 13'
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Hard question to answer, it's a matter of how mad you'd be at yourself if it got damaged.
You could always replace the plexiglass if it got damaged and if you're okay with that expense, leave the rock guard at home.
I don't know how much road grime gets on the window (as I always have the guard on) and perhaps that would slowly ruin the clear view from the window.

Is your window plexiglass? My 1992 and 2008 are.

Also, I've seen some people turn the rock guard into a shade/awning when set up at the campground with some PVC pipe or tent poles.
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Old 03-25-2021, 01:35 PM   #3
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Plexiglass is a fairly soft material, easily scratched, so I want it when driving. I just set it on the ground leaning against the tongue in camp. Ours is covered with decals of our travels, and we use it for privacy at night. The front curtains get tangled with the upper bunk sleeper, so we leave them at home instead.

Other people do like it open. With the back curtains also opened you may be able to see behind the trailer in your rear view mirror, depending on the height of the tow vehicle and trailer.
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Old 03-26-2021, 10:29 AM   #4
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Name: Michael
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The shield is there for a reason. Glass will break if struck with road debris like small rocks etc. Plexiglass won't break but it will mark.
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Old 03-26-2021, 11:11 AM   #5
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Trailer: 2004 13 ft Scamp Custom Deluxe
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Depending on your tow vehicle. With an ordinary tow vehicle it would be difficult to launch any debris high enough to strike the window. most stuff won't hurt the window anyway. I have had many fiberglass trailers which had been towed for decades without a gravel guard with no harm. In fact road debris does cause small chips and marks on the front of the trailer over time... 99% of which are below the bellyband.


A common mod is to make awning rods for the rock guard so that it can be opened and propped up to form an awning over the window and provide shade, adjustability and full view. It also allows the cover to remain in place without the need to remove it completely.
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Old 03-26-2021, 11:37 AM   #6
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IE.
Another advantage is that I can open my front window in the rain.
Attached Thumbnails
rock cover 1.jpg   Rock cover 2.jpg  

Rock cover 3.jpg   Opening front window ext.jpg  

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Old 03-26-2021, 12:03 PM   #7
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Name: Donna D
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
IE.
Another advantage is that I can open my front window in the rain.
No, an advantage for your build is you have a window that opens. Not on (most) Scamps... at least not since the mid-1970s.

This is the solution Floyd spoke about
Attached Thumbnails
Joy-GravelGuard.jpg  
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Old 03-26-2021, 12:33 PM   #8
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Fine.
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Old 03-26-2021, 02:00 PM   #9
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Besides possible rocks or hail (small probability but the faster you go the more of an impact a rock or hail would make), and air temperature fluctuations (another small probability of extreme heat to extreme cold or vice versa, and speed can possibly accelerate this phenomenon), my theory has always been that it has to do with the speed you are going. Then I discovered the Bernoulli Principle, which seemed to explain what is happening.

The faster you go, the lower the pressure inside the trailer (and the higher the pressure outside of the trailer).

The lower pressure inside and the higher pressure outside forces the outside dirt etc. into the trailer (that's why you get dust and dirt in the trailer while traveling), and if a vacuum is created inside, what is inside is forced out. (Hold a turned on hairdryer blowing straight up in the air. Put a ping pong ball in the air flow of the hair dryer and it floats on the air. Put a toilet paper tube in the air above the floating ping pong ball and the vacuum created shoots the ping pong ball through the toilet paper tube and into the air. The Bernoullli Principle.

It's a crap shoot if your window breaks. Due to the numerous reasons it can break, speed seems to increase the probability of all of them.
Driving at 55 mph or 88.51 kph seems to be helpful at reducing the risk.
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Old 03-26-2021, 08:50 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donna D. View Post
No, an advantage for your build is you have a window that opens. Not on (most) Scamps... at least not since the mid-1970s.

This is the solution Floyd spoke about
that is precisely it! Thanx
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Old 03-27-2021, 09:39 AM   #11
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Name: bill
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Fortunately both of my FG trailers have rock shields over large front windows. These shields were designed so they can be used as awnings over the windows, which I use all the time. The protection of the front window is just another benefit. Note, both of my front windows open, huge plus. This is on a Trillium and my Escape. I have been thinking of visiting some RV wrecking yards, and picking up a rock guard to install on the rear of my Trillium. One more awning, and I would probably put a solar panel on it.
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Old 03-31-2021, 10:15 AM   #12
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Name: Carl
Trailer: Boler
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floyd View Post
Depending on your tow vehicle. With an ordinary tow vehicle it would be difficult to launch any debris high enough to strike the window. most stuff won't hurt the window anyway. I have had many fiberglass trailers which had been towed for decades without a gravel guard with no harm. In fact road debris does cause small chips and marks on the front of the trailer over time... 99% of which are below the bellyband.


A common mod is to make awning rods for the rock guard so that it can be opened and propped up to form an awning over the window and provide shade, adjustability and full view. It also allows the cover to remain in place without the need to remove it completely.
I don't have anything over my front window. I replaced it 3 years ago with lexan. Have not had an issue. But If I had a cover I would definitely do the above mod though. I would love the shade. May do this eventually. Also I have some decent mud flaps which helps.

I wonder about having a solar panel over each window front and back as shade?

One nice thing though about having an open window front and back is you can see right through your trailer while driving to see anyone behind you.
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Old 03-31-2021, 10:27 AM   #13
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I take the rock shield off when I travel. I can see all the way through to the traffic behind me, it also makes facing into a spot easier. I made shield for the rear also, and use them both as sun shades when I get to my destination. I've put thousands of miles on mine, it's a 77 scamp, the windows are getting crazed. After 44 years I guess it's expected, both front and rear are plexiglass. I travel with the shields inside the camper with bungie cords holding them against the front seat. If you get to a stoney gravel road, pull over and put them on to keep the windows cleaner and protected until you are off it. Enjoy it, they are really pretty tough little campers.
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Old 03-31-2021, 11:25 AM   #14
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Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
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All of my trailers have come with the front window cover and the prop rods to hold in at whatever angle I set it. Works well. Even my big truck doesn't throw road debris high enough to hit the window but, in my experience, it isn't the tug that throws things to break the window, it's other vehicles going in the opposite direction you have to be concerned about throwing rocks that break the windshield in the tug and the windows in your trailer.
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Old 04-06-2021, 08:31 AM   #15
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Name: bob
Trailer: Was A-Liner now 13f Scamp
Missouri
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I agree with you Mr. Floyd!!!
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Old 04-06-2021, 08:58 AM   #16
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Name: zack
Trailer: scamp 13
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Awesome discussion here. As always, thank you very much. Really appreciate it!
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