New Trailer starter kit - Page 4 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-17-2019, 12:25 AM   #61
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Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
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Originally Posted by jim_ivy View Post
The great thing is that you can do it your way and I can do it my way.

That is true. But, it's also necessary that people get good information when making their choices.
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Old 02-17-2019, 02:39 AM   #62
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Glenn, I am sure you are a very nice fellow, and I have no idea what has set you off about toilets.

Over the last 6 years, I have been in my Casita every night except for a couple of hospital stays. I have been traveling and camping in the wilderness since I was 12 - that is well over 60 years now - on foot, horseback, canoe, and for the last 10 years in a small Casita. Even with my Casita, I seldom camp in developed campsites. I go as far from where the pavement ends as I possibly can.

I can tell you for a fact that I have what works for me down pat. It may not be your preferred way of operating, but it is valid information and you have no logical reason to insinuate otherwise.
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Old 02-17-2019, 06:29 AM   #63
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Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
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Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
I love Windex. I'll have to try that!

I use it all the time for washing my hands and keep a spray bottle in the back of the truck just for that purpose. It's also in the trailer, the Jeep and several bottles in the garage.

Can you wash windows with it too?
Yes you can, if they are glass. But many RVs have windows made of Plexiglas and Windex with ammonia should not be used.

https://www.wikihow.com/Clean-Plexiglass
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Old 02-17-2019, 07:48 AM   #64
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Name: Diane
Trailer: 2015 Lil Snoozy
Delaware
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Originally Posted by Roger M. Sonora View Post
Don't forget to save room for yourself!
As a full-timer for years I know you can easily overload on what you "think" you need and what you "really" need. Do your best to buy multi-use products and tools. Take into consideration where you will be spending your time the most and plan for that area. (Mountains,Desert,Coast etc.) Downsize "everything". Limit the number of "things" 2 large coffee cups instead of 6 etc.(storage space becomes a premium very quickly) Avoid clutter or you'll end up in a pocket surrounded by "stuff". It's a new home but there isn't room for that sofa! haha
Oh you are going to have a ball sorting this out, we all have!
Good luck and Happy Camping!
Most of what I'm bringing is already multi use as it's used for tent camping. However, the biggest space hogs in the trailer will be the dogs! They're pretty big. Ugh!
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Old 02-17-2019, 07:54 AM   #65
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Name: Diane
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Delaware
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Originally Posted by Roger M. Sonora View Post
After you've moved that HUGE body pillow around 50 times and can't see the forest through the monster pack of Costco TP, you learn about Camper's time and space management. hahaha
I guess I'd have to do some serious time management to ensure I have enough TP before then next store! Funny but practical comment!
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Old 02-17-2019, 07:57 AM   #66
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Name: Diane
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Delaware
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Originally Posted by jim_ivy View Post
Most comfort items you can pick up along the way. But emergency items you may not think of until you need them in the middle of nowhere. This is what I carry and hope to never need:

1. Extra cash. Credit cards are nice, but in an emergency, cash is nicer.
2. A lug wrench that won't slip off the nut when you need it (learned this the hard way)
3. A jack or some way to lift the trailer if you do need to change a tire.
4. A plastic sheet or ground cloth in case you need to change a tire in mud.
5. Warning flares or lights to warn other traffic
6. A safety cord to make certain the cable to your vehicle does not pop out and drag on the highway.
7. Extra fuses in the appropriate size.
8. Battery cables in case you forget to unplug the car and your fridge drains your vehicle battery. I also carry a battery-powered charger that will start my tow vehicle.
9. Several extra flashlights
10. Battery pack with USB outlet in case your cell phone battery dies.
11. Rainwear / Cold Weather gear stored where you can get to it easily.
12. 30 amp to 20 amp adapter
13. Bottled water.
14. Small took kit - hammer, screwdrivers, pliers, measuring tape, aluminum tape, duct tape, etc.

Other items that I know I will need:
15. Wet wipes & toilet paper
15. Small pail that can be tightly sealed for used toilet paper (don't want to put TP in the cassette or holding tank)
16. Empty laundry detergent container with a cap that will not leak. (for urine instead of filling the holding tank)
17. Small broom

If you intend to go off of the beaten track: a small single burner stove and tea kettle along with large cups, utensils and a supply of freeze dried emergency rations. GPS device. hand-held walkie-talkies.

Wow, Jim...good one. On my list. Thanks
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Old 02-17-2019, 11:36 AM   #67
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Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B 2020 Toyota Highlander XLE
British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jim_ivy View Post
Glenn, I am sure you are a very nice fellow, and I have no idea what has set you off about toilets.
It may not be your preferred way of operating, but it is valid information and you have no logical reason to insinuate otherwise.

I have been camping too, for more than fifty years, and I've been pooping for seventy years.

I am only saying that your pooping protocol is unnecessary. Those who are seeking advice can weigh the information provided and make a decision.
It would help if you explained why you think TP and urine needs to be separated.
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Old 02-17-2019, 11:52 AM   #68
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Trailer: Black Series HQ19
Smith Valley, Nevada
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Diane,

I'm afraid that if you follow everyone's list of "necessities", based on the worst case and longest stay imaginable, where there are no supplies available, and no help available, in the worst weather, and with people trying to steal your stuff such that you need spares of everything, meanwhile worrying about exploding water lines all night, poop pyramids all day, and tires flying off every time you move the trailer, you'll never have any fun at all. I thought camping was supposed to be fun, and an adventure.

As I understood the original question, you simply wanted some recommendations for the first night or two after picking it up. Keep it simple.

I'm sorry this discussion went so far into the weeds. If you follow all of the worst case, "what if" possibilities, you'll need to have someone follow you along with a one ton truck full of supplies. And be sure to rent a hotel room to stay in because there will not be room for you in the trailer!

Here's an example: On our last trip up the coast to Oregon, my truck's water pump suddenly failed and stranded us, miles from any large towns. Well, I didn't have a spare. Imagine that! A serious planning deficiency? Not at all. So we handled it and moved on. Next time, should I bring a spare truck water pump, and a second spare in case one is not enough? Maybe three, just to be sure?

Relax, follow your heart and actually have some fun! It's highly unlikely you'll have any problems and if you do, you'll have fun figuring out how to deal with it. Look forward to waking up the first morning in your new trailer, having a cup of coffee, getting the dogs organized and planning a fun day, as you play with the features in your new trailer. As time goes by, you'll think of things you want and you can get them next time you go to town.

We have a couple of small rectangular dog dishes we set near the door. Kibbles in one and water in the other. When it's time to move, I simply dump out the water dish and off we go. They sit on a welcome mat just inside the door and never go sliding around. Old plastic jars with screw on lids, or empty coffee cans with plastic snap-on lids are great for kibbles and treats.

One thing I tend to bring too much of is food. Taking advantage of coastal seafood, Southern breakfasts, or Texas bar-b-que are good ways to meet people and get to know the area a bit. We like to stop on the road for breakfast or lunch and we cook more simply while camping than at home. My wife loves to cook and can turn out amazing meals in one pan. My specialty is breakfast concoctions, when we are not covering the miles. I'll head outside with a plate and my coffee, to sit next to the fire and enjoy.
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Old 02-17-2019, 12:01 PM   #69
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post

I am only saying that your pooping protocol is unnecessary. Those who are seeking advice can weigh the information provided and make a decision.
I'm standing by with my popcorn, as the debate begins on "pooping protocol". Fortunately, we've established the credentials of each participant, with their long track record on the subject. Sheesh.

I wonder if Diane is watching and taking notes.

OK, let the games begin!!!
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Old 02-17-2019, 12:14 PM   #70
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Originally Posted by gordon2 View Post
Yes you can, if they are glass. But many RVs have windows made of Plexiglas and Windex with ammonia should not be used.

https://www.wikihow.com/Clean-Plexiglass
Good information, mostly, but they lost me when they got out the sand paper.
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Old 02-18-2019, 09:11 AM   #71
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Name: Ray
Trailer: scamp
Indiana
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Originally Posted by Paul O. View Post
You could get away with a regular (15 Amp) extension cord and a simple adapter (female 30A to male 15A). That adapter is also handy without the extension when only 15 Amp shore power is available. That is, of course, unless you think you would run your AC, Microwave, toaster, electric space heater, or whatever, all at the same time.



Actually even with my ac on and a hair drying going I don't exceed 15A. OK I do have a small portable hair dryer and my home one with the AC would exceed 15A.
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Old 02-21-2019, 11:47 AM   #72
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Name: Jason
Trailer: Still researching
Alabama
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About locking the coupler while driving

Quote:
Originally Posted by mary and bob View Post
You may consider a water pressure regulator, get one that has the gauge on it. Also one of the blue water filters and maybe a 90 degree hose adapter, depending on where the hose connector is. Get a blow out adapter if you will be where the trailer has to be winterized. Surge protector for the power connection. Ours plugs on to the campground power post and at least indicates the correct polarity. Not sure about how much surge protection. Wheel chocks and leveling blocks. Coupler lock for when the trailer is parked and a padlock for the coupler when towing.
I was going to post a reply, then I saw where Mary and Bob read my mind. Ditto to their suggestions, with one exception. When I first pulled a trailer, I too had a padlock on the coupler while under way. When my father in-law saw it he suggested using a straight pin instead. The reason? If you ever had some type of roadway emergency where you needed to unhook the trailer very quickly, a padlock would leave you fumbling for keys, and slow you down. (example: camper on fire.)
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:05 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by Jasoninalabama View Post
I was going to post a reply, then I saw where Mary and Bob read my mind. Ditto to their suggestions, with one exception. When I first pulled a trailer, I too had a padlock on the coupler while under way. When my father in-law saw it he suggested using a straight pin instead. The reason? If you ever had some type of roadway emergency where you needed to unhook the trailer very quickly, a padlock would leave you fumbling for keys, and slow you down. (example: camper on fire.)
I use a padlock on mine. It's convenient and can't possibly fall out. My trailer keys are always in my pocket when we are out. Not too worried about it, but a lock also acts as a minor theft deterrent since the coupler can't be opened with the lock in place. Minor deterrent, I know. In my case with the Oliver, for a theft deterrent, the whole telescoping tongue, with the coupler, pulls out of the trailer by removing one cross-bolt.
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:12 PM   #74
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Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jasoninalabama View Post
I was going to post a reply, then I saw where Mary and Bob read my mind. Ditto to their suggestions, with one exception. When I first pulled a trailer, I too had a padlock on the coupler while under way. When my father in-law saw it he suggested using a straight pin instead. The reason? If you ever had some type of roadway emergency where you needed to unhook the trailer very quickly, a padlock would leave you fumbling for keys, and slow you down. (example: camper on fire.)
I would prefer to have them locked- both the coupler latch and the drawbar- as an added measure against malicious vandalism: pulling the pin in a parking lot. It has happened.

In the unlikely event the trailer is on fire while hitched to the tow vehicle, the pin is only one of several things you have to undo- the safety chains being the most trouble. If it's bad enough that I'm in a hurry, my response would be get everyone clear and let it burn. That's why I have insurance.

I keep all the camper keys on the same ring as my tow vehicle key, as well as duplicates in the glove compartment, so for a minor situation, they are always near at hand.

Neither is a likely scenario, so I'd say do what floats your boat.
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Old 02-21-2019, 12:58 PM   #75
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I lock mine. Keeps it somewhat secure at camp too.
I use weight distribution hitch, so I would have to unhook that as well as safety chains.
Burn, baby, burn.
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Old 02-21-2019, 07:05 PM   #76
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My drawbar pin is a 5/8" hardened bolt with a nylock nut cinched up. To remove it requires tools and time. And it can never, under any circumstances, fall out. Plus I can suck the square tube in just enough to reduce rattling.
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Old 02-22-2019, 06:42 AM   #77
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Name: Diane
Trailer: 2015 Lil Snoozy
Delaware
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
Diane,

I'm afraid that if you follow everyone's list of "necessities", based on the worst case and longest stay imaginable, where there are no supplies available, and no help available, in the worst weather, and with people trying to steal your stuff such that you need spares of everything, meanwhile worrying about exploding water lines all night, poop pyramids all day, and tires flying off every time you move the trailer, you'll never have any fun at all. I thought camping was supposed to be fun, and an adventure.

As I understood the original question, you simply wanted some recommendations for the first night or two after picking it up. Keep it simple.

I'm sorry this discussion went so far into the weeds. If you follow all of the worst case, "what if" possibilities, you'll need to have someone follow you along with a one ton truck full of supplies. And be sure to rent a hotel room to stay in because there will not be room for you in the trailer!

Here's an example: On our last trip up the coast to Oregon, my truck's water pump suddenly failed and stranded us, miles from any large towns. Well, I didn't have a spare. Imagine that! A serious planning deficiency? Not at all. So we handled it and moved on. Next time, should I bring a spare truck water pump, and a second spare in case one is not enough? Maybe three, just to be sure?

Relax, follow your heart and actually have some fun! It's highly unlikely you'll have any problems and if you do, you'll have fun figuring out how to deal with it. Look forward to waking up the first morning in your new trailer, having a cup of coffee, getting the dogs organized and planning a fun day, as you play with the features in your new trailer. As time goes by, you'll think of things you want and you can get them next time you go to town.

We have a couple of small rectangular dog dishes we set near the door. Kibbles in one and water in the other. When it's time to move, I simply dump out the water dish and off we go. They sit on a welcome mat just inside the door and never go sliding around. Old plastic jars with screw on lids, or empty coffee cans with plastic snap-on lids are great for kibbles and treats.

One thing I tend to bring too much of is food. Taking advantage of coastal seafood, Southern breakfasts, or Texas bar-b-que are good ways to meet people and get to know the area a bit. We like to stop on the road for breakfast or lunch and we cook more simply while camping than at home. My wife loves to cook and can turn out amazing meals in one pan. My specialty is breakfast concoctions, when we are not covering the miles. I'll head outside with a plate and my coffee, to sit next to the fire and enjoy.
Thanks for bringing us back to earth. I agree with you that "stuff" can get too cumbersome. I'll travel with the minimum and I'm confident that my TT will take me where I wanna go. All the rest is luxury! BTW...My dog food is in a 5 gallon bucket-good for a week!
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