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Old 12-09-2018, 12:27 PM   #1
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Name: Andrew
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NC
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Newer model Bigfoot Quality

I am considering purchasing a new Bigfoot 25B25RT-rear twin travel trailer. Do any late model Bigfoot owners out there have any comments about the quality of their trailers? Are you happy with your purchase? Any issues to consider?

Thank you!
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Old 12-09-2018, 12:50 PM   #2
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Trailer: Bigfoot 25 RQ
North Carolina
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We own a 2018 25 foot rear queen model and have been very pleased. It has been more comfortable and liveable for our style of longer trips and true four-season comfort than our previous Oliver.
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Old 12-09-2018, 04:28 PM   #3
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Thank you! Really appreciate the input. Do you feel like the insulation really makes it a 4 season camper? We love winter camping. Also, have you had any issues with the camper? Anything option you wish you has purchased but didn't?
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Old 12-09-2018, 05:36 PM   #4
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Trailer: Bigfoot 25 RQ
North Carolina
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We were cozy with minimal condensate issues over a few trips where we saw sleet, snow and night time lows in the mid-20’s F. Not super cold, but our experience to date. We did order MaxiFan covers on both fans so we can run them during rainy weather. I have done quite a few mods, as I did on our Oliver. We have basic solar right now, a single 170 watt panel and two AGM batteries. So far so good. Have put 18,000 miles on this trailer since April. Next year’s trip to the Yukon and NWT could change my luck, but we are very pleased to date and Bigfoot has been great addressing questions and our minimal issues.
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Old 12-09-2018, 07:20 PM   #5
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Also, what issues did you have, if any? Also, were there any options you wish you had purchased?
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Old 12-09-2018, 08:35 PM   #6
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North Carolina
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Only issue was a bad switch on an outdoor light. They sent entire replacement light. Happy we ordered front storage. We deleted bedroom door. Deleted bedroom TV. Did not order generator nor outdoor speakers. 11k A/C starts and runs using our propane powered Yamaha 2,000 generator.
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Old 12-09-2018, 11:11 PM   #7
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Thanks again! I also have an Oliver. I have an Elite II. Love it but would love a little more room and storage tank capacity for longer boondocking trips. How would you compare the build quality of the Bigfoot to your Oliver?
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:22 AM   #8
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Do you feel like the insulation really makes it a 4 season camper? We love winter camping.
Having camped many nights in single digit temps, I can say mine is a true four season trailer. Nothing has ever froze and inside can be as warm as you want. By mistake I left furnace on once, 8 degrees outside and 80 degrees inside.
Usually we keep it at 60-65 while outside can be very cold.
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Old 12-10-2018, 09:18 AM   #9
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Trailer: 2018, 21ft escape— 2019 Ram 1500 Laramie
NW Wisconsin
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One of the things I noticed on the Bigfoot is that the furnace is sized for cold weather ( 20K / 30K BTU’s ) where on my 21 ft SOB the furnace is 12,000 BTUs
I ran the heat loss calculations on my 21 footer and the furnace is not sized for cold weather camping
( 3 season trailer ) but how many people camp at temps below zero .
On paper / hypothetically if it was cold and windy my trailer would lose heat faster than my furnace could produce it

Like they say “You get what you pay for”
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Old 12-10-2018, 10:39 AM   #10
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It doesn't directly address your question, but I do pretty well even in my 91, non-winter-package Bigfoot.

I haven't winter camped, but I'm in it starting in April all the way through the end of October, which means I definitely see extended periods of highs in the 30's/40's and lows in the low 20s, sometimes teens.

I definitely have condensation but I only see it being an issue if you camped for long periods and it's always wet. Doing a week or so at a time in cold weather then giving it a chance to dry out for a few days would be fine, I'd think.

I have to be more careful of water lines freezing when I'm out in low 20's and teens overnight, but I've never had a real issue. I've had a line freeze once but not rupture. Just had to wait a couple hours for water to start flowing again. Most annoying thing that ever happened was my waste tank valves freezing, since they're hanging out under the camper. I was planning to leave for Utah that morning but needed to dump my tanks first, and had to wait until they thawed. Ended up taking it to a car wash and spraying up there with hot water till it thawed.

Anyway that's a Montana spring/fall cold snap, comparable to anything you'll run into in NC. Earlier model, non winter package Bigfoot and it does great.
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Old 12-10-2018, 12:36 PM   #11
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Missouri
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Hi Andrew,


Were I ordering a new one I would definitely get the front storage compartment. The two foot. longer wheel base will make it tow better plus it gives you a place to store longer items such as fishing rods and/or a light weight step ladder and additional batteries. Also I would see if I could get them to put a broom and mop closet somewhere in the interior. There is no storage space inside long enough for a broom.



I don't use the outside shower, to take a shower anyway (I can't imagine anyone that does) so I would probably leave that off. Also I would leave off the rear ladder and roof top luggage rack. I have never seen anyone ever carry luggage or anything else up there. It would skin up the gloss fiberglass for one thing. For safety reasons you really don't want to be climbing up on the roof of your camper at camp anyway. When work needs to be done I use a regular extension ladder leaned against the rolled up awning, to avoid scratching the fiberglass, and I tie the ladder off both ways so it can't fall. They use a lot of through the fiberglass shell screws to attach the ladder and luggage rack and they are subject to developing leaks at the screw holes.



The awning is another thing I am lukewarm about. When I do use mine I enjoy it but It is a costly option and it does require a lot of attention. If you are going to sleep all night long or if you are going to leave camp for any length of time you must retract the awning to avoid potential damage from an unexpected wind or storm. Also if rain water pools in an awning the weight can tear it off. If I had $5.00 for every time I have been out of bed at 2:00am retracting my awning because a storm came up I could take us all to Worlds of Fun. An awning also requires numerous screws through the fiberglass to attach it. Myself, I would probably leave it off.


Speaking of screws, one of Bigfoot's favorite tricks is to use zinc coated screws for everything on the outside of the body. These ALL RUST in very few years. I ordered a bunch of stainless steel screws from the internet and have replaced most of my rusted screws. If you are ordering a new trailer ask them about using stainless screws. It probably would not be bureaucratically possible but the additional cost would be minimal. I think I paid about $30 for my internet order of 300 screws of various sizes and I still have about 200 of them left.



A generator is absolutely necessary for air conditioning in hot weather when you don't have shore power. But I would not want the built in generator under the body. I don't like the location under the body where it gets the road salt and grime and is difficult to inspect or service. And I don't like the chance it could develop an exhaust leak that would filter into the trailer. I prefer to carry a separate portable.



I would want the trailer wired for solar and I would want more than one battery. On a cool night one battery can not run the furnace blower all night long. You wake up at 3:00 am and the battery is just about dead. Not good for the battery or you.


Bigfoot 25's are heavy. A lot of people have a strong mental block about going to a heavier 3/4 or one ton tow vehicle (yes you can pull one with a 1/2 ton). That being said a more capable tow vehicle is a safer tow vehicle. My latest is a Ford F-350 single rear wheel truck. It handles and feels much better whether towing or not. No one who uses a heavier tow vehicle ever complains about it or wants to go back to a smaller one.


One last thing: We are talking about a trailer that costs upwards of $50,000. If at all possible build or have a place to store it inside when not in use. And wax it with a good quality paste wax at least twice a year. If you do those two things the gel coat will remain glossy and attractive for decades. If you don't it WILL oxidize and detract from the appearance. The depreciation costs from that will more than pay for a building in a few years.


Cheers,


Bruce
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Old 12-10-2018, 01:20 PM   #12
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Regarding cold weather: You are good for comfort down to below zero Fahrenheit but the water system requires intensive management if you have water in the system. You have to keep the trailer warm and you must use the furnace to do that. An electric space heater in conjunction with the furnace will help but by itself in the living area does not heat the tanks below the floor. The furnace blower does that.




Also don't forget the hot water heater. It is NOT heated by the furnace blower. Even though it is well insulated it is exposed through its door grate to the outside. It must be turned on, at least periodically, to keep it warm.



A temporary night time dip to the upper 20s f is not going to hurt anything. Any colder than that or any longer than that and you need to to really be thinking about all of this, especially when you are towing and it is cold.



You will not be able to leave a fresh water hose hooked to city water. You must use water from the fresh water tank. To fill the tank from city water you will need to bring the hose inside to thaw it. If you could get the gate valve open you could dump the waste tanks but what if it freezes open? Leaving the stinky hose hooked up at zero would not be a good idea.



I will leave it to others to calculate exactly how long the two propane tanks will last in extreme cold weather but it won't be very many days.
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Old 12-10-2018, 01:55 PM   #13
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Boerne, Texas
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Originally Posted by Bruce H View Post

I will leave it to others to calculate exactly how long the two propane tanks will last in extreme cold weather but it won't be very many days.
Does the 25’ come with 20lb or 30lb tanks? Also, are the tires LT tires or trailer tires?
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Old 12-10-2018, 03:07 PM   #14
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Trailer: 2018, 21ft escape— 2019 Ram 1500 Laramie
NW Wisconsin
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We are experiencing night time low temps in the single digits and daytime highs in the 20’s . The start of winter is still about two weeks away and it will only get colder . A trailer that can only be used when the temps go above freezing during the day is still a 3 season trailer for us . We were hoping that the Bigfoot trailer could handle temps in the below zero range .
We understand that we could not use the plumbing system but if we could maintain interior temps of 60 deg F when the outside temps are well below zero that would be satisfactory and meet our needs
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Old 12-10-2018, 03:11 PM   #15
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Trailer: Bigfoot 30th Anv. 25B25FB
Washington
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Ditto on the front storage box option. I have that on my 08' Bigfoot 25B25FB. After downsizing from an 09' Bigfoot Touring Edition motor home, I found the storage on Bigfoot trailers without the front box pretty lacking. That front box makes all the difference for bigger items and any additional items as mentioned before.


I also have the built in Onan generator package. Personally I like it as I don't have to lug around another item (generator) when I'm camping or carry extra gas to run it.


As far as the awning collecting water it is an easy fix. just have one side of the manual awning set a little lower. Water runs off. Our previous motor home didn't have that option as the awning was electric and water would build up.. Wind is another thing. If you are not going to be around to attend to the awning for any length of time, put it down to avoid possible wind damage. Just common sense.
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:35 PM   #16
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If I was to ever give up my Escape 5.0TA it would be for a Bigfoot 25'

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce H View Post
Great input from experience, Bruce. Like any trailer and owner I am sure there are different thoughts, but I love hearing from experience

Were I ordering a new one I would definitely get the front storage compartment. The two foot. longer wheel base will make it tow better plus it gives you a place to store longer items such as fishing rods and/or a light weight step ladder and additional batteries. Also I would see if I could get them to put a broom and mop closet somewhere in the interior. There is no storage space inside long enough for a broom.
I love the idea of more storage, but adding the 2 feet to (for me) an already big trailer concerns me. Bigfoot did a great job of incorporating this into the trailer, something that Escape did not do. I like the pass through storage on the FB. I was wondering if they would/could do something similar in the rear of the RT. With the RT there is more cabinetry I like to keep fishing gear and anything not related to the campsite setup on the tow vehicle so I have that stuff with me when I drive away from camp. You can get an extendable handle broom that fits in smaller spaces.

I don't use the outside shower, to take a shower anyway (I can't imagine anyone that does) so I would probably leave that off. Also I would leave off the rear ladder and roof top luggage rack. I have never seen anyone ever carry luggage or anything else up there. It would skin up the gloss fiberglass for one thing. For safety reasons you really don't want to be climbing up on the roof of your camper at camp anyway. They use a lot of through the fiberglass shell screws to attach the ladder and luggage rack and they are subject to developing leaks at the screw holes.
I too have never used an outdoor shower as a shower, but love having in on the curb side at a height that works well as an outdoor tap with a table in front of it. Handy for cooking and cleaning outside. Interesting on the ladder and rack, I had thought it was a good idea, but you are right, I have to wonder how much I would really use it. All the screws used could be bothersome to maintain. ]Something to consider, for shure.

The awning is another thing I am lukewarm about. When I do use mine I enjoy it but It is a costly option and it does require a lot of attention. If you are going to sleep all night long or if you are going to leave camp for any length of time you must retract the awning to avoid potential damage from an unexpected wind or storm. Also if rain water pools in an awning the weight can tear it off. If I had $5.00 for every time I have been out of bed at 2:00am retracting my awning because a storm came up I could take us all to Worlds of Fun. An awning also requires numerous screws through the fiberglass to attach it. Myself, I would probably leave it off.
Personally, an awning is a must have for our style camping, deployed almost all the time. but I do know of others who rarely use it. I do like the electric one on my Escape.

A generator is absolutely necessary for air conditioning in hot weather when you don't have shore power. But I would not want the built in generator under the body. I don't like the location under the body where it gets the road salt and grime and is difficult to inspect or service. And I don't like the chance it could develop an exhaust leak that would filter into the trailer. I prefer to carry a separate portable.
I have never used a gen set with a trailer, opting to camp in as cool of a climate as possible. I definitely would not get that option. If I ever felt I needed it, I would just plug it in to the power cord.

I would want the trailer wired for solar and I would want more than one battery. On a cool night one battery can not run the furnace blower all night long. You wake up at 3:00 am and the battery is just about dead. Not good for the battery or you.
Does Bigfoot prewire for solar as an option? I would want to do my own solar system. And yes, at least two batteries are a must for me.

Bigfoot 25's are heavy. A lot of people have a strong mental block about going to a heavier 3/4 or one ton tow vehicle (yes you can pull one with a 1/2 ton). That being said a more capable tow vehicle is a safer tow vehicle. My latest is a Ford F-350 single rear wheel truck. It handles and feels much better whether towing or not. No one who uses a heavier tow vehicle ever complains about it or wants to go back to a smaller one.
I regularly tow a trailer heavier than a 25' Bigfoot with my F150 and have never felt it lacking. I also know of a few folks towing with one with an F150 and are more than happy with the performance. I guess one could start with that and consider an F250 down the road when upgrading the truck. I had 3/4 and 1 ton diesel pickups for near 30 years up to just over a year ago, and was very happy to downsize to the F150, which is much for comfortable and fun to drive.

One last thing: We are talking about a trailer that costs upwards of $50,000. If at all possible build or have a place to store it inside when not in use. And wax it with a good quality paste wax at least twice a year. If you do those two things the gel coat will remain glossy and attractive for decades. If you don't it WILL oxidize and detract from the appearance. The depreciation costs from that will more than pay for a building in a few years.
At my final house which will happen in a couple years, I plan to build a shelter for my trailer.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce H View Post
Regarding cold weather: You are good for comfort down to below zero Fahrenheit but the water system requires intensive management if you have water in the system. You have to keep the trailer warm and you must use the furnace to do that. An electric space heater in conjunction with the furnace will help but by itself in the living area does not heat the tanks below the floor. The furnace blower does that.
Good to know info.

Also don't forget the hot water heater. It is NOT heated by the furnace blower. Even though it is well insulated it is exposed through its door grate to the outside. It must be turned on, at least periodically, to keep it warm.
I assume by turned on you mean it needs to have water flow through it, or do you mean if it is turned off to turn it on. When hooked to the grid I always have in on electric, but when boondocking I put it on as needed, so would have to watch this.
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Old 12-10-2018, 08:51 PM   #17
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Trailer: Bigfoot
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Picked up a new 21 foot Bigfoot this fall after serious consideration of the increased cost and weight over the competition. Toured the factory and had an opportunity to see some Bigfoot trailers and campers during production and observe the difference in insulation and details behind the walls. No comparison. Only spent one sub freezing night so far in the trailer (snowed on the way home) but were impressed with the warmth and quiet (ducted furnace). Did not special order the trailer so it has more features than we will likely use boondocking or at non-serviced sites in the national, state and provincial parks that we frequent. Outside speakers, tv antenna/mounting bracket and the outside shower wouldn't have been on the list. Large fridge and tanks, double pane solar reflective windows, solar panel and of course the insulation are the features that provide the function while boondocking and comfort in the shoulder seasons. The 21 foot came with twin 30# propane bottles, room for four 24 series batteries and "E" rated trailer tires.
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Old 12-11-2018, 08:46 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by Jim Bennett View Post
If I was to ever give up my Escape 5.0TA it would be for a Bigfoot 25'
That says it all for me , Gives us something to contemplate over the long winter

Thanks Steve D.
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Old 12-11-2018, 08:49 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
That says it all for me , Gives us something to contemplate over the long winter

Thanks Steve D.
Winter won't be too long, as we are headed south for a couple months after Christmas.
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Old 12-11-2018, 08:51 AM   #20
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Winter won't be too long, as we are headed south for a couple months after Christmas.
Hope you have a great trip , we plan on staying home and defending our state from invaders .
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