OBD device. - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-06-2017, 06:11 PM   #1
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OBD device.

A couple of years ago there was a device which was all the rage, which could divulge all sorts of information when attached to the OBD port on your TV.
what was the name of the most popular device?

I'm looking for a simple non invasive way to monitor transmission temperature.
Yeah...I finally got forced into buying an automatic.
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Old 07-06-2017, 06:20 PM   #2
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obd ii scanner

EDIT: They are very handy. Mine has built in bluetooth to communicate with an app on my cell phone.

EDIT2: Mine is a "BAFX Products 34t5 Bluetooth OBDII Scan Tool for Android Devices" bought on amazon for $20.
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Old 07-06-2017, 06:38 PM   #3
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From what I read, if your vehicle puts transmission temperature on the OBD network, the OBD II scanner can read it.
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Old 07-06-2017, 06:39 PM   #4
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I use the torque app with a cheap bluetooth reader I got on eBay.

First: note that these Bluetooth adapters, often Chinese copies, don't always work, esp with the Toque app. I might have been lucky but so far mine has work fine.

Second, note that Toyota is damn secretive OBDII data, and since I have a Toyota I had to resort to using a custom data point based on sensor and programming information I got on the ever reliable Internet.

But it does seem that the info I found is apparently reliable. The tranny temp readout that I get does track what I would expect. And BTW, that is on two different Toyota vehicles. Vehicles from other manufacturers apparently have better documented sensors and OBDII data, so the Torque app is more reliable. Like they say, YMMV.

For info on the Torque app.. start with the Wiki.


PS. Condolences on your purchase of an automatic.
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Old 07-06-2017, 07:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floyd View Post
I'm looking for a simple non invasive way to monitor transmission temperature.
Yeah...I finally got forced into buying an automatic.
Floyd,

Do you think you could just drop some large bearings into the trannie to lock up the torque converter? It would be sort of like the mechanical equivalent of a bypass contactor in a soft starter panel.

I saw an older thread with some recent posts on the Escape forum last night. Maybe there's something helpful there...

Using a ScanGauge to monitor towing performance? - Escape Trailer Owners Community
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Old 07-06-2017, 08:23 PM   #6
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Floyd,

Do you think you could just drop some large bearings into the trannie to lock up the torque converter? It would be sort of like the mechanical equivalent of a bypass contactor in a soft starter panel.

I saw an older thread with some recent posts on the Escape forum last night. Maybe there's something helpful there...

Using a ScanGauge to monitor towing performance? - Escape Trailer Owners Community
I would't have the "bearings" to try something like that even if I wanted to!

Thanks for the link that was exactly the thing I was thinking of...and wanted to "scan"
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Old 07-06-2017, 09:16 PM   #7
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I would't have the "bearings" to try something like that even if I wanted to!
Oh, yeah - I expect you're not talking roller bearings there.
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Old 07-06-2017, 09:58 PM   #8
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Scangauge was the one that folks used, until the cheap and free appa came out. Oh, there is or was another brand, Ultragauge IIRC.
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Old 07-07-2017, 05:28 AM   #9
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Before you buy make sure the information you seek is available. I too wanted to monitor transmission temperature and while my transmission apparently has a temp sensor, Scangauge can not read it.
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Old 07-07-2017, 08:23 AM   #10
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Before you buy make sure the information you seek is available. I too wanted to monitor transmission temperature and while my transmission apparently has a temp sensor, Scangauge can not read it.
Check any forums for your vehicle. Scangauge didn't include the settings for my RAV4, but I found them at the RAV4 forum & entered them using the manual. Same with my 2016 Tacoma.
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Old 07-07-2017, 08:27 AM   #11
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I have a Scangauge in both my vehicles. They work nicely.
In my '06 Highlander I can get the transmission temp. I found the codes to read it somewhere on the web.
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Old 07-07-2017, 10:07 AM   #12
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I have a Scangauge in both my vehicles. They work nicely.
In my '06 Highlander I can get the transmission temp. I found the codes to read it somewhere on the web.
The new tow has access to everything the Scanguage does right on the dash screen...EXCEPT trans temp! Wouldn't you know it!
I'll give it some thought, which means I'll probably never do anything about it.
I have a laser temp gun so I'll just pick a spot on the tranny and check it when I stop for gas.
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Old 07-07-2017, 10:48 AM   #13
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Transmission dip stick?

My first auto I was concerned. At 30k I did a dump and fill. The fluid looked new. That's after several trips over the Rockies. About to do my second dump and fill. If the fluid looks good I probably won't worry about it even if a method becomes available.
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Old 07-07-2017, 11:25 AM   #14
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Years ago I had a Nissan minivan to pull our popup. It was during when the Dodge & Chrysler minivans has systemic transmissions issues. My Nissan drivetrain was totally different but that got me worried. So I installed a temp gauge in the transmission aux cooler fluid line. I used a T brass manifold and appropriate fittings to mount the sensor. The gauge itself was a mechanical unit, sold for engine temp (coolant).

This worked perfectly. I nice thing was just by looking at the gauge I could tell if the torque converter was locked or not. ATF temps varied wildly between locked and unlocked (pan temps are much more stable).

In the end, I found that the transmission temps were not that high most of the time (I had an aux cooler). But the gauge was nice to have. Also, city driving (stop and go) is as worst for ATF temps that going uphill. And when climbing a steep and long grade, ATF temp will rise no matter what size an aux cooler you have. A larger cooler will simply lower the temps faster before the next grade.
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Old 07-07-2017, 11:26 AM   #15
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I have Scangauge II and it reads water temp. and transmission temp.
Driving a 1999 Silverado 1500 reg cab 2WD 4.8 engine automatic.
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Old 07-07-2017, 12:21 PM   #16
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Transmission dip stick?

My first auto I was concerned. At 30k I did a dump and fill. The fluid looked new. That's after several trips over the Rockies. About to do my second dump and fill. If the fluid looks good I probably won't worry about it even if a method becomes available.
Unfortunately there is no dipstick on my new TV.
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Old 07-09-2017, 04:52 PM   #17
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Unfortunately there is no dipstick on my new TV.
A little research solved this problem, checking it is more like a stick shift.
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Old 07-09-2017, 05:15 PM   #18
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. . . Also, city driving (stop and go) is as worst for ATF temps that going uphill. And when climbing a steep and long grade, ATF temp will rise no matter what size an aux cooler you have. A larger cooler will simply lower the temps faster before the next grade.
I measure my ATF fluid with the Torque app and a Scantool Bluetooth adapter. But I don't have a frame of reference. Pulling up a grade last month in Colorado my gauge read between 170 and 180. What temperature range would be considered safe, in other words, not likely to cause any damage to the transmission?
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Old 07-09-2017, 06:34 PM   #19
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I measure my ATF fluid with the Torque app and a Scantool Bluetooth adapter. But I don't have a frame of reference. Pulling up a grade last month in Colorado my gauge read between 170 and 180. What temperature range would be considered safe, in other words, not likely to cause any damage to the transmission?
Its the combined effect of temperature and time at temperature that affects ATF fluid, and in turn and over time, the transmission itself.. About 10,000 people on the Internet have it explained it better than I can, including some with impressive credentials on the subject (automotive engineers).

Your readings are quite good for a tranny under heavy load. So good in fact, that I would question how accurate it is.
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Old 07-09-2017, 08:36 PM   #20
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After looking at various charts on the web (ATF temps over time vs durability) I considered temps up to 175-180 as "normal".
Temps between 180 to about 210 were "warm". Usually hilly driving, or city driving.
I have not seen temps over 210 very often. City driving and very warm weather, or going up very long grades. Highest I've seen, for a brief moment, was 230. Going up Cape North, (along the Cabot Trail, Cape Breton, NS) with the popup in tow. First time I ever had to downshift to 1st gear (to climb the last 1/2 mile), as the minivan was running out of breath in 2nd. That was brief, but it was a bit extreme.

But consider that these temps we measured at the outflow line, between the transmission and radiator and cooler. The pan temperature was probably 10-15-deg cooler (I read on another forum about someone who rigged an electric temp gauge with one sensor in the ATF line and another in the pan, he could switch between the two, and he said that the pan was 10-15deg cooler most of the time). Pan temps are more stable. ATF line temps vary a lot with torque converter locking/unlocking. When unlocked and under load, I've seen ATF temp shoot up about 1 deg per second. Then as the converter locked up, the temp dropped almost instantly to just above where it was. Interesting to watch!
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