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Old 10-25-2020, 06:10 PM   #21
Junior Member
 
Name: Murray
Trailer: 1975 Trillium 1300
BC
Posts: 17
Wow, hold off on scrapping anything just because itís more than 20 years old.

From what I can see in the photo, if you are referring to the ridge near the base of the spindle, that is the portion that has been machined to the exact diameter required to hold the bearing. You should see a similar section on the outer end for the outer bearing to sit on. See how the new (or old) bearing sits on the spindle. It should slide on and off easily when everything is clean and shouldnít wobble. If itís been slack for a long time there may be fretting on the spindle but unless it had seized and spun the bearing on the spindle it should be fine. You can also measure the spindle where the bearing sits to ensure itís within specs.

There really is no reason to replace the axle if it isnít damaged or sagging. If youíre not sure, have a mechanic at a smaller independent place look at it, not a chain store, Costco etc - they are trained to follow the book and if itís not in the book youíre out of luck.

The axles, spindles, springs on my 29 Model A are original and are no different than when they were made. Heck, almost the entire car is 91 years old so I guess I need to replace it.

Free advice on the internet is worth about what you pay for it but thatís my 2 cents. (from 25 year journeyman heavy duty mechanic).
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Old 10-26-2020, 07:54 AM   #22
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Name: Greg
Trailer: 2008 Casita 17 SD
Washington
Posts: 1,669
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chilliwack Murray View Post
Wow, hold off on scrapping anything just because itís more than 20 years old.

From what I can see in the photo, if you are referring to the ridge near the base of the spindle, that is the portion that has been machined to the exact diameter required to hold the bearing. You should see a similar section on the outer end for the outer bearing to sit on. See how the new (or old) bearing sits on the spindle. It should slide on and off easily when everything is clean and shouldnít wobble. If itís been slack for a long time there may be fretting on the spindle but unless it had seized and spun the bearing on the spindle it should be fine. You can also measure the spindle where the bearing sits to ensure itís within specs.

There really is no reason to replace the axle if it isnít damaged or sagging. If youíre not sure, have a mechanic at a smaller independent place look at it, not a chain store, Costco etc - they are trained to follow the book and if itís not in the book youíre out of luck.

The axles, spindles, springs on my 29 Model A are original and are no different than when they were made. Heck, almost the entire car is 91 years old so I guess I need to replace it.

Free advice on the internet is worth about what you pay for it but thatís my 2 cents. (from 25 year journeyman heavy duty mechanic).
Casita uses Dexter Torque Flex axles, which have rubber torsion bars inside that allow for a flexible suspension, unlike leaf spring axles. Those rubber bars do degrade and deteriorate over time, and even Dexter recommends that they be replaced when they get about 20 years old.
Any utility or horse trailer repair place can swap it out with a new one in about an hour for $500-600 bucks.
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Old 10-26-2020, 08:33 AM   #23
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Name: Floyd
Trailer: 2004 13 ft Scamp Custom Deluxe
IllAnnoy
Posts: 7,832
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Originally Posted by Casita Greg View Post
Casita uses Dexter Torque Flex axles, which have rubber torsion bars inside that allow for a flexible suspension, unlike leaf spring axles. Those rubber bars do degrade and deteriorate over time, and even Dexter recommends that they be replaced when they get about 20 years old.
Any utility or horse trailer repair place can swap it out with a new one in about an hour for $500-600 bucks.
Torsion axles do not come with built in timers.
They should be replaced when they are worn out, as evidenced by excessive negative camber and toe-out resulting in tire wear to the inside edge of the tire.
You can "shake your fist" at them or use a "stop watch" for replacement, but wear and performance is the voice of reason when replacing axles.
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Old 10-26-2020, 10:27 AM   #24
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Name: Ron
Trailer: R-Vision 21'
Ontario
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarvin View Post
Hi! We bought a 1970 Boler on Craigslist and now weíre supposed to pack the bearings and I have called a few auto mechanics and a few RV service places and theyíve told me itís too old and they wonít do it. Is this normal? Iím in Tacoma. Should I keep calling places or should we try to figure out how to DIY it?
Too old to repack??? Good one...
Axles too old, should replace??? Another good one...

I have a 40+ year old utility trailer, has seems many a repack and literally tons of loads for thousands of miles... no issues.

I used to work for U-haul, repacking hubs on trailers crossing the country many times a year without any repacks, the only time we saw siezed bearings or damaged hubs was units that sat for years or were heavily overloaded...
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Old 10-26-2020, 10:41 AM   #25
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Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
Posts: 1,890
If that was my trailer that spindle would be just fine. as for the bearings and seals if you buy new you buy the bearings and races and 2 seals and cotter pins for each tire and one set of extra bearings. make sure bearings are name brand and not the cheapest china or india bearings. take the extra seals and cotter pins and put them in a bag for next time. take the extra bearing and race and grease them and place them in the trailer in a used butter tub for emergency service if needed. This way the next time you need to grease the bearings you have them and don't have to go searching for them in the middle of a repack. get yourself an electrice cordless impact gun and a torque wrench for dealing with the tires I use a Dewalt because I have the rest of the cordless line. using an impact to deal with wheels make a young-un out of you.

at minimum you will need one seal for each wheel and 1 cotter pin for each wheel. if the bearings don't look good and need replacing then you will need new inner bearing and race and outer bearing and race. some axles have the same size inner and outer bearing on small trailers. then you will need a tub of grease I would recommend marine type water proof grease if your trailer sits allot.


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Old 10-26-2020, 01:26 PM   #26
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Name: Ron
Trailer: R-Vision 21'
Ontario
Posts: 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by floyd View Post
Torsion axles do not come with built in timers.
They should be replaced when they are worn out, as evidenced by excessive negative camber and toe-out resulting in tire wear to the inside edge of the tire.
You can "shake your fist" at them or use a "stop watch" for replacement, but wear and performance is the voice of reason when replacing axles.

Yes indeed, torsion axles are a whole different story compared to solid or tube axles with leaf spring suspension. They wear out as the rubber inside them deteriorates with time (just like tires)... Solid or tube axles have no wearing components other than the springs and hubs. Axles that have seen a lifetime of use can sometimes wear from the inside grease seal contact, but that's an easy fix with the proper sized wear sleeve. Springs can crack and break as well, but usually only if badly rusted, used on rough roads, or overloaded. A bearings worst enemy is usually water getting in and diluting or displacing the grease.
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Old 10-26-2020, 02:05 PM   #27
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Name: Ron
Trailer: R-Vision 21'
Ontario
Posts: 8
I agree...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chilliwack Murray View Post
Wow, hold off on scrapping anything just because itís more than 20 years old.

From what I can see in the photo, if you are referring to the ridge near the base of the spindle, that is the portion that has been machined to the exact diameter required to hold the bearing. You should see a similar section on the outer end for the outer bearing to sit on. See how the new (or old) bearing sits on the spindle. It should slide on and off easily when everything is clean and shouldnít wobble. If itís been slack for a long time there may be fretting on the spindle but unless it had seized and spun the bearing on the spindle it should be fine. You can also measure the spindle where the bearing sits to ensure itís within specs.

There really is no reason to replace the axle if it isnít damaged or sagging. If youíre not sure, have a mechanic at a smaller independent place look at it, not a chain store, Costco etc - they are trained to follow the book and if itís not in the book youíre out of luck.

The axles, spindles, springs on my 29 Model A are original and are no different than when they were made. Heck, almost the entire car is 91 years old so I guess I need to replace it.

Free advice on the internet is worth about what you pay for it but thatís my 2 cents. (from 25 year journeyman heavy duty mechanic).
I have plenty of things far older than 20 years, they are still doing a great job and will for another 20 with proper maintenance
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Old 10-26-2020, 04:31 PM   #28
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Name: Murray
Trailer: 1975 Trillium 1300
BC
Posts: 17
Yes, and even the rubber in a torsion axle has no built in chronological lifespan. It can fail in far less than 20 years or last almost indefinitely.

The rubber in the axle is almost completely sealed inside and no subject to ozone, sunlight or most any other outside impact. Major heat, overextension or severe rust are about the only way the torsion area can fail or be worn out.

Measure, test, inspect. If it passes itís good but remember, in a world run by lawyers, no manufacturer will ever say a product doesnít have a finite life or they would be liable when it eventually fails whether thatís 21 years or 91 years in the future.

If it makes the OP feel better to drop several hundred dollars on a new axle and a few hundred more if you need to have someone else install it, by all means do it but thereís other things Iíd rather spend my allowance on.
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