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Old 10-22-2016, 02:17 PM   #1
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Name: Eileen
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Paint Stove

The 2-burner stove in my 1977 Scamp works fine but looks terrible-lots of rust. Would like to repaint. Any advice on how to clean it up and what kind of paint to use that won't give off fumes when it gets used?
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Old 10-23-2016, 04:33 AM   #2
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Hi, I just sanded mine and spray painted with car engine paint. Never smelled bad.


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Old 10-23-2016, 09:11 AM   #3
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Rarebird had a great answer. That type of paint is heat resistant.
They also sell an appliance paint at Lowes and Home Depot.
The cleaning and priming are very inportant.
Just follow the directions.
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Old 10-23-2016, 07:00 PM   #4
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Paint Stove

Thanks! Did you sand all the old paint off? or just sand it to rough it up for the paint?
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Old 10-24-2016, 10:52 AM   #5
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Paint Stove

Hi, as Darwin said, prep is important. You want to remove any loose or bumpy stuff. You can use sandpaper or steel wool. Start with the roughest, and then use a finer grade to smooth everything. Remove the dust with a damp sponge, or if you really want to go crazy, you can buy a "tack cloth" at the hardware store. It is sticky, and removes all the dust.
Have fun!
Oh, also, I never primed it. But it couldn't hurt. Some paints do not need a primer, so check the can.


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Old 10-24-2016, 01:24 PM   #6
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Thanks for the details. Looking forward to a "brand new" stove top!
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Old 10-24-2016, 01:47 PM   #7
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I use to make my own TAC rag by spraying so e paint on one and then wiping the object while the rag was sticky. The one thing you need to be careful of when doing that is lint. You do not want to get lint from a rag on the object being painted.
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:17 PM   #8
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Yes, I understand that. I used to be a woodworker in my earlier days.
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:35 PM   #9
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Eileen: As a past wood worker you have all the expertiese you require. Good luck. Take a B 4 and after shot and share.
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Old 10-24-2016, 02:39 PM   #10
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Our little two-burner stove must have been painted by the PO. It was good and shiny a year ago, but now I notice rusty spots peeking through around the burners, so obviously the prep was lousy. So at some point we'll need to sand this down and redo...
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Old 10-27-2016, 10:49 AM   #11
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Paint Stove

I got the stove top sandblasted yesterday. Powder coating is too expensive ($100). Most of the high heat paint products say not to use on stove tops or ranges - something to do with the FDA not approved for food surfaces. The appliance paint doesn't seem to be approved for high heat.

So...wondering how much you folks use your stoves and have you noticed any drawbacks with the appliance paint or car engine paint.

Got to paint soon while weather is still warm.
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Old 10-27-2016, 11:45 AM   #12
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There are three reasons the paint might not be approved for food surfaces:

1. the chemistry of the paint remains toxic after curing (like mold-resistant paints)
2. the pigments might be toxic (many exterior grade paints)
3. Nobody bothered to test it for toxicity because of cost and liability, so it's 'disclaimer labeled' against the use.

Unless you're actually planning on eating food that has sat on the painted surface for a while, its residual toxicity after curing should be of very little concern.

I recommend that you use a burner cover of some kind if your cooktop is going to be a food prep surface - ideally something like a food-grade cutting board. If you promise not to use the stove itself as a cutting board or salad bowl, the toxicity questions are much more easily managed.

The one thing I would positively recommend is to cure the paint in an oven (or with a heat gun - hard to do evenly) after painting. The major toxic element in most paints are fumes given off during the curing process. On a nice day with windows open, Paint the stove top, let it sit for a few hours at room temperature, then pop it in a ~150 F oven to cure for an hour or two. In summer you can just leave something like this sitting out on an asphalt driveway and it'll get hot enough to cure.

The idea is to get the stove top as hot as it is likely to get in normal use in a well ventilated area to encourage it to outgas somewhere that isn't your trailer. The gases given off by curing metal paints tend not to be good for living things and are a big part of why EPA encouraged water-based finishes for new cars starting in the '90s.

As a rule: if it smells like curing paint, you probably don't want to be shut up in a poorly ventilated small space with it.
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Old 10-27-2016, 01:25 PM   #13
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PAINT STOVE

Very good information. I am looking at the Stove Bright paints. The one recommended for gas stoves goes up to 1200 degrees (seems like overkill). The one for gas vent pipes is only rated up to 250 degrees, but has a nice glossy finish. I have no idea how hot the metal surrounding the burners gets, but will probably go with the first unless I get information to the contrary.

Food on the stove plate is not a problem. It's barely big enough for the burners. No room for food prep.

Thanks for the info!
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Old 10-27-2016, 03:07 PM   #14
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A match burns at 1100-1500 degrees. Go with the 1200 paint.
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Old 10-27-2016, 03:37 PM   #15
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Check out harbor freight for a home power coating thing. I think you can bake it in an oven.
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Old 10-27-2016, 05:20 PM   #16
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Powder coat works by melting dry, powdered paint at a relatively low temperature in an oven - not what I'd want on a stove. I thought about painting my rusty stove, and hadn't heard much long-term success. I replaced it with a SMEV stainless stove and recommend same. It also increases counter space with the flush-mount design, and has a thermocouple for safety.
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Old 10-28-2016, 08:01 AM   #17
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Powder coat is awesome, but not meant for heat - it's actually a layer of melted plastic on the metal once it has been baked. There are bake-on ceramic coatings (almost enameling) that you could use, but frankly the high temp paint you're looking at should do just fine.
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Old 10-28-2016, 08:09 AM   #18
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At tractor supply, hardware stores and places like Lowes they sell black and greyish paint for wood burning stoves and we use it on our wood burning stove at home. It is not shinny but it does look great and lasts for years.
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Old 10-28-2016, 09:39 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Darwin Maring View Post
At tractor supply, hardware stores and places like Lowes they sell black and greyish paint for wood burning stoves and we use it on our wood burning stove at home. It is not shinny but it does look great and lasts for years.
The matte finish may not take food spills and clean-up too well. I have had wood stoves for years and that's my experience.
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Old 10-28-2016, 10:09 AM   #20
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We pretty much have reached the any port in the storm. Everything recommended is unacceptable for one reason or another. Here is one last suggestion: Chrome Plate the thing. Whatever you do Just be careful when you cook and clean up afterword.

Or try this web site and the following solution.

http://www.rvlifestyles.com/parts_st...ducts_id=17154
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