Plumbing connections using barbed fittings - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV
Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-17-2015, 10:23 AM   #21
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Trailer: Class A Motorhome
Posts: 7,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnny M View Post
I agree about the low cost of using a clamp, but Bob, my decision on not using clamps was based on the link you provided which stated in the document:

"There is also a downside to clamps. If installed incorrectly, clamps can actually induce leaks and failures. If a tie ‐ type clamp is cinched too tightly on low durometer, or soft tubing the clamp can lift the tubing away from the fitting. Securing a clamp over the portion of tubing that is stretched over a barb can have the same effect degrade the seal enough to cause leaks."



My connections have multiple barbs, so my thought was to test for leaks then add clamps if needed.

Maybe I should consider some kind of sealant with the fitting?

One has to hope that the clamp installation will be done "correctly" as would all of the other aspects of the installation. All bets are off if one has to always fear that something will be done incorrectly.

The whole world of RV's is running with hoses clamped into place with correct sized & tightened clamps. But I am sure that more than a few have had unclamped hoses pop-off after anything from hours to years of use.

BTW: Any sealant that does not harden would have to be adhesive compatible with both materials, the hose and the fitting, sealants that don't harden would tend to provide a lubricant to help the hose slip off with time.



Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2015, 10:25 AM   #22
Senior Member
 
frank_a's Avatar
 
Name: Frank
Trailer: 2012 ParkLiner #006
New York
Posts: 2,273
Clamps must be sized to the hose. Parkliner used too big a clamp on my shower hose - it leaked, as the clamp was tightened into an odd shape. Correct clamps (I always use two on barbed connections) did the trick.

Frank
__________________
2012 ParkLiner #006
2013 4wd 4 door F150 3.5L Ecoboost with 9200# tow package
frank_a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2015, 10:41 AM   #23
Senior Member
 
Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
Posts: 1,890
This is what I used inside my 13 foot Scamp. This tube is rated at 250 psi. Uses barb fittings and hose clamps.

Sioux Chief 3/8 in. x 10 ft. Vinyl Braided Tubing-SBVKG10 - The Home Depot
stevebaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2015, 10:47 AM   #24
Senior Member
 
frank_a's Avatar
 
Name: Frank
Trailer: 2012 ParkLiner #006
New York
Posts: 2,273
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevebaz View Post
This is what I used inside my 13 foot Scamp. This tube is rated at 250 psi. Uses barb fittings and hose clamps.

Sioux Chief 3/8 in. x 10 ft. Vinyl Braided Tubing-SBVKG10 - The Home Depot
That is what is used in my Parkliner as well. Heavy duty stuff!

Frank
__________________
2012 ParkLiner #006
2013 4wd 4 door F150 3.5L Ecoboost with 9200# tow package
frank_a is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2015, 10:55 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Steve L.'s Avatar
 
Trailer: Casita Spirit Deluxe 2003 16 ft
Posts: 1,899
Registry
My thoughts are that the suitability of hose clamps in part depends on the compressibility of the hose’s wall. Rubber and vinyl hoses being pretty good for this while the harder PEX tubing isn’t. Tightening down on PEX is more likely to deform it into a non-circular shape than it is to compress it while staying round. It might be possible to jam a barbed fitting into PEX and count on friction to hold it in place but it’s not something I’d recommend (I’m still in charge of what I recommend, right?). Even if the PEX ID is close to the barb’s OD I’m not feeling warm and fuzzy about the connection.
__________________
Without adult supervision...
Quando omni flunkus, moritati.
Also,
I'm a man, but I can change, if I have to, I guess.
Steve L. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2015, 11:35 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
The Minimalist's Avatar
 
Name: Clif
Trailer: 08 Weiscraft Little Joe 14 Subaru Outback 2.5i CVT
Louisiana
Posts: 754
Registry
"BTW: Any sealant that does not harden would have to be adhesive compatible with both materials, the hose and the fitting, sealants that don't harden would tend to provide a lubricant to help the hose slip off with time"

And OK for potable water on fresh water connections.
__________________
Clif
The Minimalist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2015, 02:46 PM   #27
Senior Member
 
Bob Miller's Avatar
 
Trailer: Class A Motorhome
Posts: 7,912
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve L. View Post
My thoughts are that the suitability of hose clamps in part depends on the compressibility of the hoseís wall. Rubber and vinyl hoses being pretty good for this while the harder PEX tubing isnít. Tightening down on PEX is more likely to deform it into a non-circular shape than it is to compress it while staying round. It might be possible to jam a barbed fitting into PEX and count on friction to hold it in place but itís not something Iíd recommend (Iím still in charge of what I recommend, right?). Even if the PEX ID is close to the barbís OD Iím not feeling warm and fuzzy about the connection.
PEX tubing and fittings are not designed for the use of hose clamp in any RV application.



Bob Miller is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2015, 06:42 PM   #28
Member
 
Name: Denise
Trailer: Amerigo FG-16
Maine
Posts: 35
Registry
I haven't redone the plumbing in my camper..yet, but it's on my agenda. However I did remove about 30 to 40 feet of Hot and Cold copper water line in the upstairs of my house. The water lines go from an upstairs bathroom to my stained glass shop via bedroom eaves and a closet. I used Sharkbite fittings and PEX pipe and have not had any problems with it, zero. I drain them when it gets cold up here so that they won't freeze. I've been told that the PEX is a lot more tolerant of the freezing than copper is, but I'd just as soon not push it. But I've had no leaks..in fact, getting the Sharkbites and the PEX to separate requires a little U shaped plastic tool (that is purchased separately according to the size of the PEX) and it takes a little doing (for me) to separate them. Works great, I plan on using the PEX and Sharkbites to reno my camper water lines.
__________________
73 Amerigo FG-16
DeniseinMaine is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Removing a barbed PEX fitting? Fallon Plumbing | Systems and Fixtures 10 06-07-2015 09:22 PM
Plumbing fittings? Jake Jacobson Plumbing | Systems and Fixtures 13 10-26-2008 04:13 PM
Gray water fittings and connections? Roy in TO Plumbing | Systems and Fixtures 4 06-02-2008 11:52 PM
plumbing plumbing plumbing..... Herb P Plumbing | Systems and Fixtures 6 06-17-2007 06:01 PM
Qest Replacement Fittings Victor Benz Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 0 07-28-2006 12:37 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:43 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions Inc.