Propane Use in the Mountains - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 02-06-2020, 08:42 PM   #21
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I had a bag of chips pop on me once driving over Loveland Pass, 12,000 ft. We were almost at the top when it happened. And it is very distracting. I said to myself I should make a pin prick in all of those chip bags the next time.
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Old 02-06-2020, 08:48 PM   #22
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I said to myself I should make a pin prick in all of those chip bags the next time.

Which would release the nitrogen they use to inflate the bags for freshness and to keep chips from getting crushed by the stock boys.
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Old 02-07-2020, 08:41 AM   #23
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Not to hi jack this thread
But can you tell me the dates of the rally and also is it limited to only Big Foot trailers or are others welcome
Also do you have the name of a contact person for reservations or simply done thru KOA
Thanks in advance
Alan- If you haven't already, you might contact the host (Karen) via email - while the rally is not for BOCI members only, I do believe it is booked up - but Karen has a waitlist in case anyone cancels if you're interested!
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Old 02-07-2020, 09:25 PM   #24
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Which would release the nitrogen they use to inflate the bags for freshness and to keep chips from getting crushed by the stock boys.
A bag of chips in my car or truck never lasts long enough to go stale...

Deflated and crushed? Very probable, as soon as you come down to 5000ft. from 12000 in 40 minutes.
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Old 02-07-2020, 10:49 PM   #25
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My understanding is that water takes longer to boil and that possibly the propane pressure is lower. Is that right? Will our furnace and hot water heater function as normally or do we need to carry alternative sources for heat/hot water? Thanks for your experienced help!
Water at higher elevations boils at a lower temperature, it should boil quicker, but cooking takes longer because the water is not as hot. The maximum water temperature is determined by the boiling point, and that is determined by the atmospheric pressure. A pressure cooker would help with this if it's a problem. But who cares if it takes a little longer to cook dinner?

Propane pressure is affected by temperature, not altitude.

At high elevations, burners will run richer, or, with a higher fuel to oxygen ratio than what is ideal. But this will probably go unnoticed on a relatively short trip. Someone mentioned the fridge might have a problem over 6,500', so make sure it stays lit.

You mentioned you will be bringing an electric heater, so I assume you will have hookups. In that case, run the fridge on 120 volts. Don't run the electric heater on the inverter. Don't run the fridge on 12 volts.
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Old 02-08-2020, 09:05 AM   #26
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all good info

yes stay off 12v for any reason your battery will love you for it.

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Old 02-08-2020, 09:25 AM   #27
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yes stay off 12v for any reason your battery will love you for it.

bob
12 volts is fine for its intended use, such as lighting, water pumps and the entertainment system. Just don't use it for the fridge, where propane is much better. Also, be careful with it when unplugged and running the inverter. You have to stay within your 12 volt budget, so be careful with the microwave, or when re-charging an electric bike, for instance.
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Old 02-08-2020, 09:51 AM   #28
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good stuff

I love el. bikes saw so many versions while in Israel. I was amazed with their steep hills those bikes kept on truckin.

but wait with rods in my back better lay off of that one but I sure want one! LOL

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Old 02-08-2020, 11:56 AM   #29
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I love el. bikes saw so many versions while in Israel. I was amazed with their steep hills those bikes kept on truckin.

but wait with rods in my back better lay off of that one but I sure want one! LOL

bob

I just got one in Quartzsite. It is much different than what I thought I might end up with. 20" fat tires, folding, only 500 watt motor, etc. But it is so much fun and so practical.

I would never have charged it from the batteries in my other trailer, but I have solar on this one, so I tried it out. It's a perfect example of trying to stay within the 12 volt budget, and understanding what is available. For example: Our balance of power usage vs charging was fine, and then the new bike came along. Did we have extra before, or do we now reduce usage elsewhere to accommodate the bike?
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Old 02-08-2020, 12:36 PM   #30
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el bikes

are you talking about those big bikes with saddlebags on them? man they were nice. how much were they?

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Old 02-08-2020, 12:48 PM   #31
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Greetings! We are scheduled to attend the Bigfoot mini-rally in late July at the Cripple Creek KOA in Colorado. The site is listed at about 10,000 feet in elevation. What do we need to do/anticipate about using propane for our furnace, hot water heater, and cooking range? My understanding is that water takes longer to boil and that possibly the propane pressure is lower. Is that right? Will our furnace and hot water heater function as normally or do we need to carry alternative sources for heat/hot water? Thanks for your experienced help!
You will want to be sure your tanks have propane in them. In your state it should not be a problem, but in some states it may be. It may be a problem in cold temperatures. When comparing propane and butane, the most important differences come down to the boiling point of the gases. Propane has a boiling temperature of -42C, whilst butane has a higher boiling point at -2C. ... When stored as a liquid in a tank, propane also exerts a greater pressure than butane at the same temperature.
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Old 02-08-2020, 12:54 PM   #32
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propane tanks

I think when filling propane tanks are filled they are only filled to a certain leval in consideration of these thing you have mentioned. I don't know anything about butane in tanks.

bob

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Originally Posted by AC0GV View Post
You will want to be sure your tanks have propane in them. In your state it should not be a problem, but in some states it may be. It may be a problem in cold temperatures. When comparing propane and butane, the most important differences come down to the boiling point of the gases. Propane has a boiling temperature of -42C, whilst butane has a higher boiling point at -2C. ... When stored as a liquid in a tank, propane also exerts a greater pressure than butane at the same temperature.
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