Propane Use in the Mountains - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-27-2020, 12:08 PM   #1
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Propane Use in the Mountains

Greetings! We are scheduled to attend the Bigfoot mini-rally in late July at the Cripple Creek KOA in Colorado. The site is listed at about 10,000 feet in elevation. What do we need to do/anticipate about using propane for our furnace, hot water heater, and cooking range? My understanding is that water takes longer to boil and that possibly the propane pressure is lower. Is that right? Will our furnace and hot water heater function as normally or do we need to carry alternative sources for heat/hot water? Thanks for your experienced help!
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Old 01-27-2020, 12:14 PM   #2
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everything will work OK, just not quite optimally. your stove and furnace, and water heater will run a little rich, but close enough for jazz.

water boils at a lower temperature, and foods take a little longer to cook
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Old 01-27-2020, 01:28 PM   #3
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One thing I've noticed is that the burners do get more sensitive to debris etc. I had to use a little compressed-gas electronics cleaner to blow out the fridge and water heater burners. Probably would have been a problem eventually, but I could have gone longer between clean-outs closer to sea level.
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Old 01-27-2020, 09:35 PM   #4
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We have camped at a few high elevation places, maybe not as high as 10,000 ft. and the only problem we have had was with the cheap butane gas lighters. We always have a couple of those lighters and a couple of boxes of matches, just in case. (Our cook top does not have piezoelectric ignition.)
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Old 01-27-2020, 10:01 PM   #5
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We have camped at a few high elevation places, maybe not as high as 10,000 ft. and the only problem we have had was with the cheap butane gas lighters. We always have a couple of those lighters and a couple of boxes of matches, just in case. (Our cook top does not have piezoelectric ignition.)
We have experienced the same problems camping at 10 K feet. We purchased large matches that are windproof, so they burn longer which makes lighting the stove easier. It helps in the morning when you wake up to open the doors of the trailer to allow more Air in, in order to aid in lighting the stove top. Dave and Paula
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Old 01-28-2020, 11:02 AM   #6
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I live in Leadville, Colorado which is above 10,000 feet. I don't believe it takes longer to get water to a boil but water does boil at a lower temperature (190 degrees instead of 212 at sea level) which means that I have to use a pressure cooker for things like beans. Realize that foods boiled in water such as potatoes take longer to cook because of the lower temperature.



We use propane on our grill and used a Mr. Heater and Coleman propane camping stove when the power went out for a day. Both worked just fine.



Another thing to consider is that food and drinks rapidly cool off. I am afraid it has led to bad habits such as eating faster. My grandmother used to complain that the water never got hot enough to make good coffee. We preheat our dishes before using them even in the summer. If you plan on baking any cakes you have to make adjustments to the leavening.
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Old 01-28-2020, 01:33 PM   #7
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Greetings! We are scheduled to attend the Bigfoot mini-rally in late July at the Cripple Creek KOA in Colorado. The site is listed at about 10,000 feet in elevation. What do we need to do/anticipate about using propane for our furnace, hot water heater, and cooking range? My understanding is that water takes longer to boil and that possibly the propane pressure is lower. Is that right? Will our furnace and hot water heater function as normally or do we need to carry alternative sources for heat/hot water? Thanks for your experienced help!
Everything will work just fine. Cooking takes longer though. We camp a lot at around 9,500-10,000 ft in CO and have had no problems.
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Old 01-28-2020, 02:08 PM   #8
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One thing I've noticed is that the burners do get more sensitive to debris etc. I had to use a little compressed-gas electronics cleaner to blow out the fridge and water heater burners. Probably would have been a problem eventually, but I could have gone longer between clean-outs closer to sea level.
when the burn is on the rich side due to the lower oxygen content, it produces more soot, especially if the flames have yellow fringes.
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Old 01-28-2020, 03:17 PM   #9
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Ooh, good point. Shouldn't be too bad with propane I'd assume (compared to gasoline or diesel, say), but enough to make a difference over time.
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Old 01-28-2020, 03:23 PM   #10
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at 10000 feet, there's about 30% less air, hence 30% less oxygen.
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Old 01-28-2020, 03:54 PM   #11
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Not to hi jack this thread
But can you tell me the dates of the rally and also is it limited to only Big Foot trailers or are others welcome
Also do you have the name of a contact person for reservations or simply done thru KOA
Thanks in advance
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Old 01-28-2020, 04:03 PM   #12
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Not to hi jack this thread
But can you tell me the dates of the rally and also is it limited to only Big Foot trailers or are others welcome
Also do you have the name of a contact person for reservations or simply done thru KOA
Thanks in advance
I don't know the answers to your questions, but here is the thread (BOCI stands for Bigfoot Owners Club):

http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...6-a-91006.html

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Old 01-28-2020, 04:31 PM   #13
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I don't know the answers to your questions, but here is the thread (BOCI stands for Bigfoot Owners Club):

http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...6-a-91006.html

CindyL
seems to suggest its for BOCI members only.
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Old 01-28-2020, 05:23 PM   #14
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Thanks for all the replies about the propane use. We'll have an electric room heater along just in case, so we should be fine. We also have lots of blankets and warm cats!

Regarding other brands of trailer attending, I know that several spaces were reserved for the BOCI group, but it is a full KOA so other spots should be available. However, activities may be planned around the BOCI theme, so the organizer should really respond at the link my wife (CindyL) provided. I would hate to assume anything!
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Old 02-05-2020, 12:13 PM   #15
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Water will boil, but not get hot. It boils at much lower temperature due to atmospferic pressure difference from sea level. Much more fuel is used to get heat from it.
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Old 02-05-2020, 12:26 PM   #16
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Fridge

The propane fridges that have igniters may not operate or operate inconsistently. The mixture is just to rich to ignite. Norcold says anything above 6500 ft maybe a problem. Keeping burner clean will help, but may not eliminate the problem.

They donít make different orifices for the fridges.

People from the flatlands may experience altitude sickness symptoms. Drink lots of water.
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Old 02-05-2020, 12:52 PM   #17
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gas burning

We have been high and we have been low never noticed much difference!

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Old 02-05-2020, 01:28 PM   #18
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Propane

Lived in Colorado for 50 years first cripple creek is not 10,000 ft it is high but not that high you shouldn't have any problems with the propane in July gets hot in Cripple Creek during the day.
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Old 02-05-2020, 07:33 PM   #19
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Well, Cripple Creek itself is "only" at around 9,500 ft, but the KOA where the rally is being held is at almost exactly 10,000 ft. :-)

We've pretty much only camped at 6,000+ feet, and haven't really had any problems - but it's all we've known. The one thing I CAN'T seem to get accustomed to is the sound of sealed plastic bags (think potato chips) popping when we go over the passes, lol. ;-)
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Old 02-05-2020, 08:45 PM   #20
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Oh my goodness, I forgot about the chip bags occasionally exploding. I swear one time I pulled over certain that I had a blown tire because the explosion was so loud. It was late at night and very dark high on mountain passes that are far away from light pollution. I got out with a flashlight and after finding all the tires just fine thank goodness, I searched the car and found chips scattered all over the back.

I live above 10,000 feet and agree that July should be warm enough but be sure to pack warm clothes including coat, warm hat, gloves, socks and warm boots along with summer clothes. You may never need them but it's miserable when the temps dip and you only have sandals and shorts to wear. Not exaggerating when I tell you that I have seen it snow in every month of the year.
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