Replacing floor / 83 Scamp 13 / STUCK! - Fiberglass RV
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Old 08-04-2018, 08:28 PM   #1
Member
 
Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
Replacing floor / 83 Scamp 13 / STUCK!

Hey, all ...

I am finally beginning some reno work on my 1983 13 Scamp, after gettting a wrist cast off recently. It is new to me, but I bought it knowing there were some issues, and - of course - finding a few more as I dig into it. My perfectionist ways are being challenged by my alter egos Skippys voice saying lets go camp! I only want to have this torn apart one time; I would greatly appreciate sharing your time and knowledge as I plod forward.

I have read (ad nauseum - to the point of thinking but afraid of doing,) the threads on floor replacement, but feel the need to ask for some advice before I proceed.

Ive removed the rotted areas of OSB (under the stove top, where a fridge would have been), and foreword of that cleaned up the top and bottom fiberglass tabs with a dremel, washed them, and starting on making the patterns for the 5/8 exterior plywood replacement.

So, heres my next step: The top and bottom thin fiberglass lips coming off the shell are relatively intact.

(1) Do I leave both of the upper and lower lips, insert the new plywood in between and build up new fiberglass lips attached to each?

(2) Do I use the lower lip for placement reference? Cut off the top existing fiberglass lip? (Sand down the remaining tiny extrusion after cutting off w my multi tool to prep for a new lip), and then glass in the new plywood (weighted to keep it in place), and build up a new top lip?

While removing the old rotted OSB, it appears it was both caulked to and screwed to the frame. Is that the correct way to proceed? Im wondering if caulking it down the length of the frame would make it too rigid for the shell to flex when it is being pulled?

(4) Should I just tuck into that next glass of wine and forget about learning fiberglass? (Lol!)

I would greatly appreciate some advice from those of you whove gone down this path. I am not replacing the entire floor. Ive removed the area under the stovetop where the icebox would have been, and just in front of that area where the radius is under the front bunk. The remaining floor seems sound.

And yes, photos! I will attach ...
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Old 08-04-2018, 09:23 PM   #2
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
I’m trying to add photos... really. Oy ....
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Old 08-05-2018, 12:27 AM   #3
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Name: Dan
Trailer: Scamp
Iowa
Posts: 93
Registry
Hey Julie, one thing to note. When removing the floor, it doesn't too much matter what you take out as long as you don't lose the shape of the Scamp. I made a foolish mistake on mine and did a bit of exploratory surgery looking for a frame crack below. In my case the correct thing to do would have been to pull the shell and floor off and look at the frame naked. Because I was over zealous with my cutting, I caused myself a lot of extra work as you can see in posts 40-43 in my resto thread (LINK).

I now have to pull that flapping bottom right corner into the correct position and shape for the door to seal. It's a pain and completely avoidable, had I only known what not to do. Live and learn.

I think you will find that feathering the new fiberglass over the new wood isn't that bad to do. Fiberglass likes curves, not 90 degree bends, so leave the lip as much as you can, but when you re-glass you can extend the new lip several inches onto the plywood. No one will ever see it, so strength before beauty.

As far as cutting farther away from the lip, without pictures it's hard to weigh in, but in general the frame will determine how much to remove. You want the new section and the old section to both sit on part of the frame rail, so really not too many choices. That may mean taking out more than you expected. You can drill with a small bit from below to get reference points and scribe lines above from there.

Get those pics up so others can help you.
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Old 08-05-2018, 07:48 AM   #4
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
Thanks, Dan! Great advice.

Luckily I am only replacing two small sections, and as far as I can tell, the shape has not been compromised. I talked to another friend who said the same: leave the lips if they are there and feather the new glass into them.

I’m still trying, unsuccessfully, to get the photos to load. Sorry! And thanks for taking the time to help me out!
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:20 AM   #5
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
Fiberglass RV - Julie in Montana's Album: Partial floor replacement - Picture
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:27 AM   #6
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Name: George
Trailer: Titanium
South Carolina
Posts: 4
Images:
I would create an account at Imgur and upload my images to there, then just link to them using Imgur' s share and this forum's image button to paste in image URL.
Imgur is free to use personally.
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Old 08-05-2018, 10:11 AM   #7
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Name: Billy Sharpstick
Trailer: Scamp 13 - 2005
Florida
Posts: 143
Registry
Floor replacement

Quote:
Originally Posted by Julie in Montana View Post
Hey, all ...

Ive removed the rotted areas of OSB (under the stove top, where a fridge would have been), and foreword of that cleaned up the top and bottom fiberglass tabs with a dremel, washed them, and starting on making the patterns for the 5/8 exterior plywood replacement.
...
If it's not too late, I have some ideas. I redid my Burro floor. After pulling out the old carpet, I found a very uneven floor. I put in a subfloor of Advantech, a very waterproof chipboard like sheet. I made it in four pices to puzzle into place. I used carbon paper to find the high spots and used an angle grinder to sculpt the underside to create a solid flat subfloor. Then put 8" 8mm vinyl click lock planks on top. A lot of work, but solid and waterproof.
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Old 08-05-2018, 10:39 AM   #8
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
Thanks for the tip, Billy. I only needed half a sheet of underlayment, so I went with exterior grade fir plywood. I will waterproof all sides once I get a pattern made before I glass it in.

It may not have been as wise a choice as the Advantech, but since I am only replacing a small section, the exterior ply should work and be a semi economical way to securely repair it. I’ll remember the Advantech if I ever have to do the entire floor - which I’m hoping never happens! ��
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Old 08-05-2018, 11:42 AM   #9
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Name: Gordon
Trailer: Trillium
British Columbia
Posts: 178
The neat thing about this genre of trailers is that they are virtually indestructible.

With the use of resin and plywood together, these units are strong.

When I did a bunch of 'glass work on mine I used the epoxy style of resins. I find that it is much more dependable than the polyester resins.
OTOH, with epoxy you have to be accurate with your mixing.
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Old 08-05-2018, 01:26 PM   #10
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
Gord - thanks! That is the type that I purchased. I’m hoping it’s a quick learning curve for me!
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Old 08-05-2018, 03:12 PM   #11
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Name: Gordon
Trailer: Trillium
British Columbia
Posts: 178
Buy a bunch of the cheap latex or vinyl gloves. Use once and toss.
Buy a bunch of the cheap disposable bristle brushes. Use once and toss.
Cut the mat/cloth/roving before you mix the resin.
Be careful with the fibres. Some people have an allergy, plus it is itchy.
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Old 08-05-2018, 05:24 PM   #12
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Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,892
You do not want the shell to flex, you want to help it be rigid. Even the cabinetry is necessary to support the shape of the shell.
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Old 08-05-2018, 08:09 PM   #13
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Name: Gordon
Trailer: Trillium
British Columbia
Posts: 178
Very true Mike.

Every internal part is important for the integrity of these little trailers.

Any changes need to be compensated for.

I was amazed with mine. I was doing some work on the roof and noticed a couple of rivet heads. With no kind of regular pattern. And, only a few.
I went and checked inside. Most of the rivets, that hold the upper and lower cabinets, and the closet were missing!
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Old 08-05-2018, 09:34 PM   #14
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
More good points from both of you to remember, Mike and Gord. I will remmeber to cut the cloth prior to mixing up the resin. I do have plenty of gloves and toss out brushes and paper bowls to mix in.

And it’s a good reminder for me to make sure all the rivets are put back in place. I’ve removed only the front and rear fiberglass bench supports to access the interior for re-wiring, but I’m sure they are an integral part of the whole system and I’ll make note to replace those rivets.

Again - thanks for the input!
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Old 08-06-2018, 09:58 AM   #15
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Name: Dan
Trailer: Scamp
Iowa
Posts: 93
Registry
I fiberglassed this weekend and found out the hard way that when working overhead, you need an access plan before you mix the resin. I am right handed, could only reach the area by laying on my right shoulder, had little use of my right arm, left arm would not fit, ended up having to abort the layer I'd cut b/c I laid in resin and was burning my triceps area.

So practice your brush strokes in advance, have a plan. The top of the floor is WAY easier, so start there and build confidence.

Dan
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Old 08-06-2018, 07:26 PM   #16
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Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
Posts: 1,890
Julie,
cut your patch pieces and fit them in place. Then take them out and seal your panels with resin and hardener on the floor side and edges. Leave the bottom unsealed. Then use pl construction adheasive and glue the edges of the panels and on the frame members and screw it down. Let cure for a day. After cure then glass down the wall tabbing. It is really important to get the edges of your patches sealed. Moisture in the edges will trap moisture in the core allowing rot. The open panel bottom helps the material if it gets wet. Its better than sealing both sides. Make sure your patches ard cut from exterior grade glued panneling wether it is standard plywood, marine ply or orentanted strand board.
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:37 PM   #17
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
Thanks, Steve - that philosophy makes sense. Much of what Ive read over the past few months leans towards sealing the top of the floor, letting the bottom of the floor breathe to dry. (I know there are some who argue this point.)

Your recommendation follows my thoughts about sealing the wood prior to attaching it to the fiberglass tabs, but takes the methodology a step farther.

Ive been wondering about the PL on the frame - it appeared there was some on the OSB I removed, but I wasnt sure if that was the way to go or to just screw the floor to the frame.

Things are starting to gel a bit for my pea brain. Thanks!
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:41 PM   #18
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Name: Julie
Trailer: 13' Scamp / 1983
Montana
Posts: 55
Thanks, Dan for the tips on upside down glassing!

I am hoping that by pulling up the rear stabilizer jacks, I can tip the front nose up pretty good and prop it securely, then squat under to do the glass work.

And then make a call to 911 Neighbor to get me outta there!
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Old 08-06-2018, 08:47 PM   #19
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Name: Steve
Trailer: Scamp 13
California
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Wood collects moisture from the air like a sponge. That moisture sitting on metal causes rust. The adheasive seals the metal from air, moisture and transfers load helping to take off the load on the screws.
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