Should I be concerned about tongue height? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-08-2018, 10:22 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathi View Post
I don't think a tandem axle functions the same on that.
Not sure what you are saying.
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Old 01-08-2018, 10:34 PM   #22
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Returning to the outside wear... It's not something I've heard much about in reference to egg trailers. I did some searching, and the most common answers were exactly what was suggested- either axle damage resulting in wheel misalignment or running very light.

I'm having a hard time believing that an empty egg trailer is so light (relative to axle capacity) as to affect tire wear. We're talking perhaps 1400 pounds on a 2200 pound axle. I could more easily see it happening with a 700 pound utility trailer riding empty on a 3500 pound axle.

You said an axle shop looked at it. Did they check the alignment?
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Old 01-08-2018, 10:48 PM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathi View Post
I don't think a tandem axle functions the same on that.
I think more people recognize the importance of a level set-up with tandem axles because it can affect tire loading as well as stability.

Generally the rigs I see being towed significantly nose up are big trucks pulling small single axle trailers. I think there's a false sense that you don't have to be as careful with a small trailer and a big tug.

I was behind a Suburban pulling a small flatbed trailer with a snowmobile, nose up. It got to swaying and took out several roadside reflector posts before they finally got it back under control. A smaller vehicle would almost certainly have landed in the ditch. But it was touch and go even for the Suburban.
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Old 01-09-2018, 04:53 AM   #24
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To the original Question... I have towed with a TV hitch that was too high and after reading posts about how the trailer while loaded and hitched should be level. bought a 4 inch step down hitch and from my experience the tug reacted a lot less jerky when going over bumps. I now tow all 4 of my trailers with them as level as I can get them.
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Old 01-09-2018, 08:45 AM   #25
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Actually, the original question was, "Is it normal for the coupler height to be less than the 18" Scamp specifies for a level tow with the 13' model?" (Answer: yes). The OP mentions leveling the rig.

The thread has now evolved to several related topics.

I, too, was taught the "never tongue up" doctrine. The reason usually given is that it causes a rearward shift in the center of mass, leading to potential instability. I'm wondering if there is any other reason. Assuming you're only an inch or two high, does it really matter that much? The shift in the CoM couldn't be much- less than an inch (assuming the CoM is low as should be, and therefore much closer to the axis of rotation). Can that really cause significant instability, assuming you are starting with a correctly loaded and balanced trailer? Is something else going on? (I am only asking in regard to single axle trailers. I realize there are other issues with tandems.)

I will confess I use two drawbars for my Scamp. I use the lower ball height- producing a perfectly level tow- for long highway trips. I use the higher ball height- about 1-1/2" higher- for short local trips into the woods to make it easier to keep the tongue jack out of the dirt. Those local trips do involve some highway stretches, and I honestly haven't noticed a difference with the slightly tongue-high set-up.

Heresy?
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Old 01-09-2018, 09:02 AM   #26
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I got tired of buying different height ball mounts and draw bars for different trailers and vehicles. This one is a little expensive but is adjustable for height in one inch increments from 3" drop to 3.5" rise and has 2 ball sizes, 2" and 1 7/8". It is available with even more adjustment and up to 3 ball sizes. One more feature I like is the ability to fold under my truck and prevent shin injuries. I like a level trailer or slightly nose down. This will keep you level, no matter what your load or vehicle is:

https://www.etrailer.com/Ball-Mounts...WTS10035B.html

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Old 01-09-2018, 09:29 AM   #27
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Nice, Tom, though I'd need the $215 version to get the necessary 5" drop for my Scamp. For now, two fixed drawbars are sufficient, and the short drop also pulls my utility trailer. I solve the shin problem by removing the drawbar when I unhitch.

Even adjustable drawbars may not eliminate the problem forever. A new vehicle may call for a different range of adjustability.
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Old 01-09-2018, 11:46 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Actually, the original question was, "Is it normal for the coupler height to be less than the 18" Scamp specifies for a level tow with the 13' model?" (Answer: yes). The OP mentions leveling the rig.

The thread has now evolved to several related topics.

I, too, was taught the "never tongue up" doctrine. The reason usually given is that it causes a rearward shift in the center of mass, leading to potential instability. I'm wondering if there is any other reason. Assuming you're only an inch or two high, does it really matter that much? The shift in the CoM couldn't be much- less than an inch (assuming the CoM is low as should be, and therefore much closer to the axis of rotation). Can that really cause significant instability, assuming you are starting with a correctly loaded and balanced trailer? Is something else going on? (I am only asking in regard to single axle trailers. I realize there are other issues with tandems.)

I will confess I use two drawbars for my Scamp. I use the lower ball height- producing a perfectly level tow- for long highway trips. I use the higher ball height- about 1-1/2" higher- for short local trips into the woods to make it easier to keep the tongue jack out of the dirt. Those local trips do involve some highway stretches, and I honestly haven't noticed a difference with the slightly tongue-high set-up.

Heresy?
The memory I have from the 1979 Coleman pop up manual says level or slightly tongue up for safety. (Better tongue up than down) Depending on the overhang I can see the sway problems made worse when the camper rear is high and heavy.
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Old 01-09-2018, 01:09 PM   #29
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my neighbor had a nice 5th wheel he had these same problems he never got it figured out. he finally sold the trailer!


it was strange


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Old 01-09-2018, 02:40 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Actually, the original question was, "Is it normal for the coupler height to be less than the 18" Scamp specifies for a level tow with the 13' model?" (Answer: yes). The OP mentions leveling the rig.

The thread has now evolved to several related topics.

I, too, was taught the "never tongue up" doctrine. The reason usually given is that it causes a rearward shift in the center of mass, leading to potential instability. I'm wondering if there is any other reason. Assuming you're only an inch or two high, does it really matter that much? The shift in the CoM couldn't be much- less than an inch (assuming the CoM is low as should be, and therefore much closer to the axis of rotation). Can that really cause significant instability, assuming you are starting with a correctly loaded and balanced trailer? Is something else going on? (I am only asking in regard to single axle trailers. I realize there are other issues with tandems.)

I will confess I use two drawbars for my Scamp. I use the lower ball height- producing a perfectly level tow- for long highway trips. I use the higher ball height- about 1-1/2" higher- for short local trips into the woods to make it easier to keep the tongue jack out of the dirt. Those local trips do involve some highway stretches, and I honestly haven't noticed a difference with the slightly tongue-high set-up.

Heresy?
When I changed tow vehicles the hitch was two inches too high. The new tow vehicle stood about three inches higher than the previous tow vehicle.
Everything was OK until I reached 58 miles per hour. Above 58 mph the Casita started to fish tail, the faster I drove above 58 mph the more severe the fish tail. Had to purchase a different hitch to fix the problem.
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Old 01-09-2018, 03:56 PM   #31
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Scamp isn't a lot of help either. When we had a 13', I guessed correctly and showed up with the correct ball height to tow it home. When we went to get our 16', the website said you need a 21" height. I know it's higher than the 13', but questioned 21". I searched the forum and found answers all over the map, and called our salesman. He said 21" was correct. Not believing that, I called the service department, but ended up talking to another salesman who actually owned a 16'. He asked what I was driving, and I replied an F-150.
He said "I know we tell people 21", but thats because most people show up in small SUV's or vans with wimpy springs. With your truck, you want 18" ball height."

Personally, I'd rather be told the correct height for a level tow, and I'll figure out how much sag I'll have to factor in. Another argument for a level tow is being able to spend the night or at least a few hours of level sleeping without unhooking the trailer. Here's how I like to roll.

Tom
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Old 01-09-2018, 04:48 PM   #32
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I use my airbags to level it after hooking up
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