Under floor insulation? - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 06-28-2012, 02:48 PM   #21
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Name: Dylan
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I do not think my 2001 has double layer reflectix. But I've only pulled back the rat fur in a few places to look behind it.

I've been very impressed with the way my Scamp has stayed cozy. I think it's very well insulated for the weight. With reflectix velcroed on the windows I can leave a heater on low and still keep comfortable temps in darn cold weather.

But even in a warm trailer, that floor is just uncozy when you step on it!

I'll consider the cork if it's only 3mm.
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Old 06-28-2012, 02:54 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dylanear View Post
I do not think my 2001 has double layer reflectix. But I've only pulled back the rat fur in a few places to look behind it..
I would be surprised if it didn't my 92 does.
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Old 06-28-2012, 03:21 PM   #23
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Kevin:

I agree that the Reflectix website is a real pain to navigate. Some of their competitor's sites are even worse.

I understand that it is the internal air gap that is providing the insulation - but my issue is that Reflectix says that will provide only R1.1 per layer without that air gap on the external side. That doesn't seem like much insulation at all. To get R15 you would need to sandwich about 13 layers together. Yet many folks report good results. Does just R1.1 or so really satisfy them or is there something else in the construction process that I don't understand?

That's why I am so interested in hearing from people who have actual experience with Reflectix and another insulation type in these moulded fiberglass trailers.

Dylan:

I'm glad you are cozy in your Scamp, and I think that your making reflectix covers for the windows is exactly how Reflectix should be used. The reflective interior surface reflects heat back into the trailer rather than letting it out the windows.

I have a similar issue with the R-values quoted for the 3mm cork underlayment. Cork seems to have an R-value of 2-4 per inch (lots of variation due to veins, etc. running through it) depending on the source. I fail to understand how 3mm can provide R-3. I expect that the foam matrix used to bind the cork particles helps (but foam only goes up to about R-7 per inch) and the fact that it acts as a vapour barrier probably helps as well. In any event, while I have problems with the claimed R-value, I know from personal experience that a floor doesn't seem as cold when these products are used.
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Old 06-28-2012, 03:32 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by GPJ View Post
Kevin:

Dylan:

I'm glad you are cozy in your Scamp, and I think that your making reflectix covers for the windows is exactly how Reflectix should be used. The reflective interior surface reflects heat back into the trailer rather than letting it out the windows.

I have a similar issue with the R-values quoted for the 3mm cork underlayment. Cork seems to have an R-value of 2-4 per inch (lots of variation due to veins, etc. running through it) depending on the source. I fail to understand how 3mm can provide R-3. I expect that the foam matrix used to bind the cork particles helps (but foam only goes up to about R-7 per inch) and the fact that it acts as a vapour barrier probably helps as well. In any event, while I have problems with the claimed R-value, I know from personal experience that a floor doesn't seem as cold when these products are used.
Yeah, I had given up on any under flooring (as opposed to under floor) insulation thinking than anything that would be thick enough and light enough to insulate would be too soft without some sort of support structure to be usable.
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Old 06-28-2012, 03:35 PM   #25
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Fitted carpet on top of the Allure will probably be a good solution and it can still be removed easy for cleaning or if it ever gets damp (the main reasons I want the permanent carpet gone)
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Old 06-28-2012, 07:21 PM   #26
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I got a closed sell foam pad at Wall Mart in auto dept. 1piece will fit on the floor and cuts easy with sisiers. just put it under carpet works well.
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Old 06-28-2012, 08:23 PM   #27
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Not all R-values are equal.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R-value_(insulation)

I too was pretty skeptical of the eco-cork having an R-value of R3. Skeptical but not concerned as the intent was to hide imperfections through thin linoleum. I am still pleasantly surprised by the extra warmth especially when I touched the uninsulated side to the dinette step and it was cold by comparison.

This discussion prompted me to reseach r-values and it turns out there is an international system and a US system. The US system being about 6 times higher! If the eco-cork was listed international its US value would be roughly R-0.5. About the same as cardboard according to the chart in the wikipedia article. Seems about right, cardboard's not a bad insulator.

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Old 03-01-2016, 06:54 PM   #28
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If I remember right the ability to heat & cool a space has an exponential relationship to its size... So a space half the size with the same R-value is vastly easier to keep warm. Also there are 3 types of heat energy, all effect a trailer in various amounts in changing conditions. A radiant barrier is very good at reflecting radiant heat, that is all it is good for. Air exchange and drafts are mostly a window and door issue. What is left is conduction, and there really is not much space in a trailer to do too much about it
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