Wet Floor - Fiberglass RV
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Old 01-02-2019, 02:02 PM   #1
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Wet Floor

Truck camper.
I think my floor issues more pressing. Might be a lemon I bought.
The floor is OSB and it is wet. soaked, rotting.
Two piece exterior with seam down the length. There is an indoor floor panel seamed up to wall, but I think is glued to the wood.
I may have to just leave it wet for now. Thinking of the fix when I can have the time. maybe cut out the floor from underside to get the wet wood out. It might have to be scraped from inner floor to get glue off, the wood will just fall off probably being rotted.
Putting the floor back on the hard part. I have never re-attached a 4 x 9.5 foot fiberglass piece. Though, it is in two pieces, so 2 by 9.5 foot and I can seam the gap after.

I took the holding tanks off, which were under the floor behind the rear of the truck, at the bumper.
Working on taking the steel frame, rusted, away from the camper, carriage bolts spin so will have to be sawzall off. The steel frame held the tanks.
I dont plan to use the holding tanks, so will not be putting those back on until it is time to sell.

How hard is it to re-fiberglass the floor?
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Old 01-02-2019, 11:39 PM   #2
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AJ, any chance of a few pics? Fiberglass work is pretty easy but can be a bit messy. I like the idea of cutting the bottom off for the wood replacement, plus the FG work doesn't have to be "paint" grade .
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Old 01-05-2019, 11:06 AM   #3
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it finally stopped raining so so soon I can cut the floor out.
It has the wood in the floor, but since it sits on truckbed, Im wondering if I put foam in there instead. Would floor support enough when off truck? (I do have the plywood X supports I made, two of them for it to sit on).
The foam is lighter and would give insulation and would never rot if wet.
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Old 01-05-2019, 11:43 AM   #4
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I agree that doing fiberglass work is not hard, but can be messy. Even after you fix the floor, it is important to track down and fix any leaks that made it wet. Even with the all-glass shells which will never rot, I would be concerned about mold. It is never good to cohabit with molds of any kind.
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:15 PM   #5
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Question

AJ, I believe the floor strength needed when the camper is off the truckbed would be approaching that required for a boat deck. There are alternatives to plywood core that are used in boat decks, but I don't think any of them are cheap (balsa, core-cell, etc).

It seems that the strength of a slide-in camper floor (when its not resting on the truck bed) needs to be somewhat greater than that of a molded fiberglass trailer camper floor resting on a metal frame, which typically includes two or three cross members.
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Old 01-05-2019, 07:35 PM   #6
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Good point on sitting the camper on my stands.
It may or may not need that support. Looking and digging I see the wood does not touch both sides in places, so it may not be needed, plus it is wet, soggy and probably as rigid as a sponge at this point.

No pics yet, but it is just a flat bottom fiberglass.

I will cut soon. I want to make a small as possible hole, but then would have to have a way to get a big plywood into a small opening.is there a way to reassembly the plywood? I dont know of any method of bracket.
I thinking maybe it just needs to be rigid side to side, not front to back, so maybe can twist some 4x2 foot pieces in.
in the back where it overhangs off the truck bed maybe it does not need any structure and i could do foam…

I do have some core-cell. Got it from an out of state friend in construction, but cant find any more of it. mine is aluminum. It is thinner , but maybe I can double it. I have just a little bit, maybe can use it at the rear where bathroom, holding tank pipes and water heater are…

havent found any black mold, doesnt mean its not there, but hoping with so much fiberglass inside surface I can just wipe down most, steam clean cusions, and some bleach underneath…
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Old 01-06-2019, 01:08 AM   #7
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the bed of a pickup truck WILL puddle quite a bit of standing water, especially if its parked facing downhill, and your camper is sitting in that... so yeah, having a sealed fiberglass bottom is a good thing.
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Old 01-06-2019, 09:31 AM   #8
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lol. truckbeds dont puddle. the engineers anticipated that and put in drains.
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Old 01-06-2019, 01:28 PM   #9
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yeah, and those never clog up with leaves, pine needles, etc...
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Old 01-06-2019, 04:32 PM   #10
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Here are pics.
I did the cut. Hoped i could just fold the front down and work, but will have to make more cuts. the rear also needs more cutting.
Some wood is fine, I may see if it can just dry out and leave it there. Other wood came out crumbling.
I can walk on the floor with no issues, the floor is strong enough, so thinking of using foam in places instead of wood,


Actually some almost good wood, will let it dry and see.
Hose is shower space heater, goes from rear right of camper, to front then back to rear left.


hose nicely tucked in the shower threshold doorway thing.


Same good wood. less work is better.
You can see the liquid nails they squirted on did not even touch in a lot of places. plywood was not as thick as the space cavity it was filling, so the LN was supposed to span the gap.






Bad wood, need to cut more floor out as it is sticking still.

Wood was worse where the leaks were, under fridge, maybe water from roof vent they did not lat seal the screws, or from water tank, which is same area, or from front window which channeled down.
Water leak at the rear where holding tanks are, or also because TCs are stored nose up, so all water would drain to rear anyway.
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Old 01-06-2019, 04:49 PM   #11
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Does fiberglass resin need warm outside temps? By the time I am doing it the temps top out at 50, 40s most days…
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Old 01-06-2019, 05:20 PM   #12
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2 part resins will take a lot longer to harden when cold, double or triple the hardening time before sanding or whatever.. it will also be thicker and not self-level as easily.
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Old 01-06-2019, 11:19 PM   #13
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Thanks for the pics AJ. A few things come to mind after seeing the underside. It looks to be built well to accommodate plumbing and venting ect. You say the floor is fine after walking on it so that tells me there is no rot problem there. It appears to me that the ply/wood flooring is only there to give a uniform platform for the camper to sit on in the truck bed. Some kind of composite material (honey comb?) could be used in the woods place. A few drain holes out the bottom and no more rotting floor, even after finding and fixing your leak sources.
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Old 01-07-2019, 07:53 AM   #14
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Agree with Borrego Dave. If the plywood is not structural, e.g., if it is not supporting the floor above it, then you could use composite decking, pvc trim, etc. Alternatively, if more strength is needed, you could use pressure treated plywood or lumber.

Is the interior floor entirely sealed, solid fiberglass?
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Old 01-08-2019, 07:12 PM   #15
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Just the fiberglass shell alone seems to be enough to support the load where it is tied to the truck. The wood at the sides were nothing but dirt and it "towed" well on the 7 hrs drive home.
The tie-downs are at the corners, so that helps.

I finished the demo, and washed, with water, the remaining bit of under side floor on the inside.
They built it by putting three ~18 inch wide treated ply woods down the length. The center one is good except the rearmost portion which I took out, so about 7 feet long now. Entire of rear is woodless now. Just the front 7 or 8 feet has wood down the center. it seemed fine, so left it as this is the main support for walking on.
I have a big fan blowing up it's open innards now.

Took the boiler and space heater out, and will have to rebuild/build a new platform for boiler to sit on, it is over the heater.

Took the 25 gallon water tank out to get to more floor at front.

The back will get all wood.
the rest will get foam board.

I want to do drains somewhere, but gotta figure out where to put it.
Poor, poor design, no wonder they went out of business.
The fridge vent door/roof vent can let water in and nothing to keep it from going to the floor. Any water that gets past the outer wall/roof has freedom to drain to the floor. It will get wet eventually. I thinking that the sides, where the wall curves to the floor outside, is the best place to have holes. Might let water in, but also will let water out. Trick will be water that drains down and clings to the under side.

Other odd thing, the space heater was open to all the air cavity of the inners. It would have pulled in all sorts of mole and icky had I not done this fix.

I did not see anything that looked like mold under there, but im no expert. There was some mold inside on surfaces that got touched a lot like lights.
Maybe just spray Lysol under?

Not sure if I said earlier, I took the bumper-looking thing off, it contained the two holding tanks. It had to come out for the demo, but was blocking my spare tire access crank hole, the license plate (camper has a place for plate) and was maybe too close for hooking up a trailer.
I dont do toilets, but will need gray tank, so will put something in. I drain gray water wherever the heck I want to, so it not need be elaborate.
The bumper-looking thing was held on via a steel frame that bolted to the floor. Complicatted, and now rusty. Not sure how I will re-model it when I sell it. I seem to sell every season and get a new project. No such thing as a perfect camper, so I keep rotating them.
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Old 01-19-2019, 02:45 PM   #16
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I have the floor put back together. Mix of ˝ inch foamboard, cheap stuff from HD, and (little smaller than) ˝ plywood. The previous plywood in the center was unaffected, so left it. The new plywood I used under the part of floor that gets walked on, and I isolated it from the perimeter, so hopefully if there is a leak it will not get to the plywoods.
Lots of Liquidnails. bit of a headache now.

I need to fiberglass the seams back in place.
Best weather is a few days an d59 degrees, but raining. Then gets cold, and I need to have this TC on the road for a month in Feb, so either dont fiberglass it or do it in the cold.

I plan to keep it warm with tarps.
does the epoxy resin need to be warm continuously or can I apply in the open then tarp it over with the heater asap?

I dont plan to be under a tarp with epoxy, even with mask.

I have three 8-foot seams, and then two 4-footers.
Plan to do them one at a time so I can focus the heater.
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