Winterizing and Propane Tank - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 10-08-2017, 03:31 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Name: Peg
Trailer: 2016 -13' Scamp
Massachusetts
Posts: 180
Winterizing and Propane Tank

I've read that most people remove their propane tank for winter storage. Is this necessary? And why?

My tank is almost empty and I'd rather leave it in place over the winter, covered with the breathable Scamp cover. Just one less chore to do!
__________________

herons is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 03:50 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
Posts: 6,839
So the tank doesn't get stolen from the storage yard where they keep the trailer.
I don't and I don't know anybody who does remove their propane tanks.
__________________

__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 06:50 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 2,775
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by herons View Post
I've read that most people remove their propane tank for winter storage. Is this necessary? And why?

My tank is almost empty and I'd rather leave it in place over the winter, covered with the breathable Scamp cover. Just one less chore to do!
I guess I am not most people as I have never removed a propane tank for winter storage. But I also store at my home, so I don't worry about theft.
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 06:50 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
John Linck's Avatar
 
Name: John Michael
Trailer: Scamp 13
Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 653
My propane tank stays on the trailer all year and thru Wisconsin's Winter. Theft is the only reason I think valid, but tanks are pretty cheap and hard to fence so I wonder if there is real risk.
__________________
John Michael Linck - Toymaker
Camping since 1960 - Scamp 13' Oak
Subaru Outback 4 cyl cvt
John Linck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 09:32 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 8,857
Registry
Ditto here. Stays on all winter. And yes, I live in a corner of AZ that has a real winter.
Jon in AZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 10:12 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Borrego Dave's Avatar
 
Name: Dave
Trailer: Casita SD17 2006 "Missing Link"
California
Posts: 3,739
Quote:
Originally Posted by John Linck View Post
My propane tank stays on the trailer all year and thru Wisconsin's Winter. Theft is the only reason I think valid, but tanks are pretty cheap and hard to fence so I wonder if there is real risk.
I found my tank missing twice before trips. Should have remembered sooner that it was me that was the thief that stole it for the BBQ. Do agree with you John, a LP tank is a very low risk unless you're grilling .
Borrego Dave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 10:26 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
floyd's Avatar
 
Name: Floyd
Trailer: 2004 13 ft Scamp Custom Deluxe
IllAnnoy
Posts: 7,540
Registry
Some indoor storage places may not allow combustibles.
floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2017, 10:33 PM   #8
Senior Member
 
Raspy's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: Black Series HQ19
Smith Valley, Nevada
Posts: 2,028
I took mine out last winter. Two 20 lb. tanks. But that was just to install the new 30 lb. tanks.

It might be better for the valve O rings to leave the tanks in place, rather than pull them out. I've had some of those crack and begin to leak, but other than that, propane can sit for many years, in all sorts of weather, and be just fine.

For winterizing, or any period of non use, just shut off the tank valves.
__________________
I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt.
Raspy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 10:20 AM   #9
Junior Member
 
Name: Dick
Trailer: in the market
Rhode Island
Posts: 3
Propane

Leave mine on all winter...Stored at home...
vector1952 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 11:42 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Name: Terry
Trailer: 1971 Hunter compact Jr, 1979 Terry 19', 2003 Scamp 16'
California
Posts: 117
If your going to remove the tank remember to cap the connector going to the regulator. Small cutter wasps find them very inviting for there nests and there hard to clean out. I have several types of outdoor propane cooking equipment. If I remove the tank for a couple of weeks without capping the connector I some times end up removing the connector from the regulator to clean the screen because some of the nest fragments get pushed through when removing it from the connector. Of course this is the San Joaquin Valley of California where we have some insect activity year round.
Terry in Fowler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 12:24 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Name: Wayne & Barbara
Trailer: Parkliner
Iowa
Posts: 1,075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Ditto here. Stays on all winter. And yes, I live in a corner of AZ that has a real winter.
"REAL" Winter? how cold and how long? Where I grew up we had nine months of winter, and three months of "hard sledding"
Wayne Collins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 12:38 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 8,857
Registry
Real winter?

I cry mercy, Wayne! Let's just call it a 2-cord winter. Enough to require winterization of RV plumbing. Enough to support a 4-month ski season an hour away. Enough to make me appreciate spring and summer. Enough to grow apples, but not peaches.

In other words, just enough. Upper Midwestern winters... you can keep 'em!

I love it that I can ski one day and hike in shorts and t-shirt the next, depending on which direction I drive!
Jon in AZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 10:34 PM   #13
Senior Member
 
Name: Jann
Trailer: Casita
Colorado
Posts: 849
Quote:
Originally Posted by herons View Post
I've read that most people remove their propane tank for winter storage. Is this necessary? And why?

My tank is almost empty and I'd rather leave it in place over the winter, covered with the breathable Scamp cover. Just one less chore to do!
No reason to remove unless you are storing in a lot. Have never removed a tank in 34 years in our yard. Always turn off tank when not in use to keep pressure off of hoses.
Jann Todd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-09-2017, 11:49 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 535
I never remove mine but I do close the valves on the tank in case of a hose leak.
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 06:52 AM   #15
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 8,857
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by floyd View Post
Some indoor storage places may not allow combustibles.
Not sure, but I think that's true if you remove the tank and store it at home, too. Your insurer will probably have an issue if you store them in your garage or shed. Fire marshall might, too.

Yes, no?
Jon in AZ is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 07:07 AM   #16
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 3,983
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Not sure, but I think that's true if you remove the tank and store it at home, too. Your insurer will probably have an issue if you store them in your garage or shed. Fire marshall might, too.

Yes, no?
What about my can of gasoline in the garage? What about the paints, solvents, acetone, turpentine? What about my propane and MAP torch cylinders? No.. garages the world over are full of all these things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jann Todd View Post
No reason to remove unless you are storing in a lot. Have never removed a tank in 34 years in our yard. Always turn off tank when not in use to keep pressure off of hoses.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_L View Post
I never remove mine but I do close the valves on the tank in case of a hose leak.
It almost goes without saying that the valve on propane cylinders should be off when the propane is not in use. My regulator starting leaking on my last trip (only 25 months old). Good thing that leak was outside so the concentration of gas did not get high enough to ignite before I discovered the leak and closed the valve.

As for removing the tank, a few reasons to do it:
1. If the trailer is stored outside, uncovered, tank will rust faster.
2. Is there a risk of theft or vandalism. Theft is rare since the value is so low, but I really don't want someone messing with the propane around my trailer.
3. To get it filled for next season. Since I have never emptied a tank in one season, I just move it to my grill at home, and put a filled tank on the trailer in the spring.

Those are minor reasons and if they do not apply, then leave it.
gordon2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 07:29 AM   #17
Senior Member
 
John Linck's Avatar
 
Name: John Michael
Trailer: Scamp 13
Madison, Wisconsin
Posts: 653
All about Propane

Propane (C3H8), otherwise known as LPG, is a form of liquid petroleum formed through natural gas processing and petroleum refining. Propane is also a combustible hydrocarbon-based fuel with a high-octane rating of 105 (R + M). It’s naturally colorless and odorless, but it is odorized for safety reasons to indicate the presence of gas in air, down to a concentration of 0.4 percent. This requires adding 1.0 lbs of ethyl mercaptan, or 1.0 lbs of thiophane, or 1.4 lbs of amyl mercaptan per 10,000 of liquefied petroleum gas.

It’s a popular fuel for two key reasons. First, it has a high energy density. Compared to gasoline, the energy content of LPG is 74 percent. It gives off a large amount of heat, roughly 92,000 BTUs per gallon of propane. Second, it has low vapor pressure, unlike methane. This means propane can be compressed into a liquid state at around 140 psi at room temperature, reducing its volume by a factor of 270 for easy storage. At normal pressures and temperatures above -44F, however, propane remains in its gaseous form.

Read more by clicking here
__________________
John Michael Linck - Toymaker
Camping since 1960 - Scamp 13' Oak
Subaru Outback 4 cyl cvt
John Linck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 11:49 AM   #18
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 535
It is illegal to store filled propane cylinders inside because it is a pressurized containment and should the containment fail the gas that leaks out has the capacity to form a flammable mixture in air that can ignite/explode. That's also why most indoor parking garages will not allow entry to propane fueled vehicles unless they have detection and ventilation systems are designed for this purpose.
Smaller propane cylinders, such as those used for torches etc., are permissible because they lack sufficient volume to generate this flammable mixture within the volume of the storage facility.
Oil-based paints and solvents are designed with a high enough flash point as to be NOT able to evaporate at a sufficient rate to generate flammable mixtures.
The flash point of gasoline is low enough to generate a flammable mixture with air due to evaporation. That is why it must be stored in "approved" containers which will contain the vapors produced.
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 05:05 PM   #19
Senior Member
 
Kenny Strong's Avatar
 
Name: kenny
Trailer: Bigfoot 13'
Utah
Posts: 320
I look at the pod at the front of my "Lil" BigFoot 13+ feet. I feel I should put a lock on it but, I hate to see one in place. Glenn I read your question often about " What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone ?" It seems it will still be there. One just can't see it anymore.

Later Kenny
Kenny Strong is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-10-2017, 05:35 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn ( second 'n' is silent )
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B '08 RAV4 SPORT V6
British Columbia
Posts: 6,839
Just want people to think about the hole, before they get out the drill.
__________________

__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
propane


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Propane tank holder: going from double to single tank Uncle Cereal Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 12 07-06-2016 02:46 PM
Propane usage (T off the trailer tank or take a spare tank) knighth001 Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 13 09-20-2012 06:37 AM
Using scuba tank for blowout winterizing? JohnF Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 12 02-02-2012 07:46 AM
An antifreeze pump mod for winterizing the black tank cpaharley2008 Modifications, Alterations and Updates 1 01-13-2011 12:46 PM
Winterizing and Winter Camping Legacy Posts Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 8 11-15-2002 05:27 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
×