You Can Repair Fiberglass - Page 5 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-14-2015, 03:30 PM   #81
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Name: Sandor
Trailer: Jazz by Thor
Utah
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Sorry guys, I'm new to the whole "forum thing".....that being said, I realize this one is a bit dated but still hope to hear back from someone with sound advice. Recently, my Jazz/Thor 5th wheel power cord had a melt down (thanks from above that it did not do any super significant damage). The cord end ultimately caught fire, burned out the female 30 amp twist lock connector mounted to the trailer and cause some blistering immediately above it on the fiberglass panel. The damage is limited to a relatively small area (2' x 2' tops) so not hardly worth an insurance claim. I have restored power to the RV and electrically/mechanically all is fine with the exception of the blistering on the panel. The blistering is only the outer skin but I am looking for a means to repair it myself and thought this thread may be my answer OR someone here may be able to steer me the right direction. Thanks in advance for all your help!
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Old 01-14-2015, 04:14 PM   #82
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Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
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I believe that your "Fiberglass" skin is a flat sheeting bonded to a core of some sort. Most on here are owners of "Molded Fiberglass Construction" RV's and, although the material is from the same family, repairs are somewhat different. And making any "Repairs" match the existing colors is a task of it's own.

As you have a small area to repair I might suggest trying to find a larger utility/cable access port and just cut back the damaged area. As an alternative, a piece of 1/8" aluminum, cut larger than the damaged area and used to remount the access door might also be an idea.

There are several other sites, such as IRV2.com, that are more slanted to your type of construction and they might have additional ideas.

In any event, posting a pic of the damage will help a lot.



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Old 01-14-2015, 05:21 PM   #83
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Here's a little tip from me and my experience keeping a Boston Whaler boat looking brand new.

PATCH PASTE KIT

Spectrum color makes small patch paste kits. If you have a NON STRUCTURAL crack or small pit, this stuff just goes on with a putty knife. Rough up the spot first then apply. Then you use 400 grit progressing to finer sandpaper and something like 3M Marine polish/wax to finish to a nice shine. This is the easiest thing I have found but beware...use outdoors and only use enough to fill the defect plus a slight skim. It gets very hard and the more you use, the more you will have to sand back off.

They can make this in any color if you have something to sample with. A year ago I tried to get them to add FGRV's to their colors, but they never get inquiries. Maybe they will if enough of us order it for patching. I find it invaluable for my boat and I can do a small repair NO ONE can detect. The little 2 oz. usually lasts longer than the once opened shelf life. It dries pretty fast so work quickly.
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Old 01-18-2015, 11:11 AM   #84
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Name: Loren
Trailer: 1978 Boler 13'
Alberta
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The closet in my boler previously had a piano hinge holding the door, and then various placements of other hinges.. the latest of which is wiggly. So, I have a dozen or more tiny screw holes to repair. From reading this thread, and I'm very appreciative for it, I think my steps to get started are:

1. Buy a drimmel tool so that I can sand out the many holes
2. Buy mat FG, resin, and acetone
3. Sandpaper, paper bowls, toss-away brushes
4. Safety equipment

Then,

1. Bevel out holes with drimmel
2. clean with acetone
3. apply mat FG and allow to cure

This is where I'm not sure to get that smooth glossy finish:

1. Finish with a fairing compound? Sand with a fine sandpaper?
2. Paint.
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Old 01-18-2015, 11:20 AM   #85
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If you are only filling screw holes, all that work isn't necessary, especially using fiberglass mat. There are fiberglass repair putty's that will do the trick and a hand held countersink tool should do 90% of the prep. BUT, you will never get that smooth glossy finish when done. That's the original Gel-Coat and it's gone. There are some gel coat repair materials out there, but so far I haven't seen anything that will match 35+ year old ge-coat to make repairs look invisible. Why don't you post a pic of the repair area and someone will suggest an alternative repair.
BTW: That's what so many of us paint fiberglass after repairs.



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Old 01-19-2015, 09:07 PM   #86
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Name: Loren
Trailer: 1978 Boler 13'
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Miller View Post
If you are only filling screw holes, all that work isn't necessary, especially using fiberglass mat. There are fiberglass repair putty's that will do the trick and a hand held countersink tool should do 90% of the prep. BUT, you will never get that smooth glossy finish when done. That's the original Gel-Coat and it's gone. There are some gel coat repair materials out there, but so far I haven't seen anything that will match 35+ year old ge-coat to make repairs look invisible. Why don't you post a pic of the repair area and someone will suggest an alternative repair.
BTW: That's what so many of us paint fiberglass after repairs.
Here are the pictures of the many tiny holes.
-1st pic shows some of the piano hinge holes,
-2nd pic shows some holes left from a previous light fixture
-3rd pic shows a hole, 3 inches in diameter

Suggestions on how to fix these are greatly appreciated!
Attached Thumbnails
IMG_1950.jpg   IMG_1951.jpg  

IMG_1952.jpg  
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Old 01-19-2015, 09:38 PM   #87
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Trailer: Bigfoot 19'
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have a look at marine tex it is tintable and is very strong. I have esed it it several different applications and it works really well.

Marine Tex, epoxy resin, adhesives, silicone grease, engine treatment, cleaner, repair, bond, fill, seal, fiberglass, aluminum, plastics, Starboard, wood
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Old 01-19-2015, 10:10 PM   #88
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Name: Loren
Trailer: 1978 Boler 13'
Alberta
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evenweight View Post
have a look at marine tex it is tintable and is very strong. I have esed it it several different applications and it works really well.

Marine Tex, epoxy resin, adhesives, silicone grease, engine treatment, cleaner, repair, bond, fill, seal, fiberglass, aluminum, plastics, Starboard, wood
Thanks, it certainly looks easy to use for the tiny holes.
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Old 01-19-2015, 10:54 PM   #89
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What "I" would do.


Any repair you do will take a lot of work to cover and make match. Soooo, I would just put those little imperfections to good use.


I would get some of the small rivet caps and bases from Scamp (They are used all over the outside of Scamps to cover pop-rivets and use small screws mount the bases and then cover each hole with a cap.


As to the larger hole: As it is right by the entry door, I might find a round flush fitting light fixture with a LED inside to use as an entry and/or night light, with a switch near the door and another by the bed. There are some round lights that fit flat to the surface with a textured milk-glass surface that would look nice.
OR
I would simply cover it with a round disk, such as you you buy to put on a wall where a door knob has damaged the wall.
OR
You could use a 3" or 4" round louvered battery vent, as used on the outside of RV's, and it would look "right" as well.


Sorta like "Repurposing" the holes for less than about $10 in parts and 30 minutes work......



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Old 01-19-2015, 11:48 PM   #90
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Name: Loren
Trailer: 1978 Boler 13'
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Great suggestions Bob. It would be very nice to not have to get into fiberglass work. I like the idea of putting a light in the larger hole by the door.
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Old 01-20-2015, 12:30 AM   #91
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Heres a link to a light I put in a tent-trailer I referbished for my son: P1010660_zpsa25c9240.jpg Photo by advocateone | Photobucket



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Old 01-20-2015, 11:55 AM   #92
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Trailer: '88 Scamp 16, layout 4
North Florida
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What I have done on the interior of the Scamp when I can access the "back" of the holes is mount a piece of trim wood scrwed from the back. I have a large selection of prefinished Oak from a major trim project years ago that comes in handy for bits and pieces like this. I like the light idea there by the door. Nothing too bright, just a little anti-trip illumination.
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Old 01-20-2015, 01:39 PM   #93
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Name: Loren
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Yeah I like that light too.
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Old 01-20-2015, 02:44 PM   #94
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Washington
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I like the light idea and pop rivets in the screw holes...Dave
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Old 01-20-2015, 04:32 PM   #95
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On this trailer, the owner seemed to use pop rivets as rhinestones.
http://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f...0-a-57783.html
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Old 01-25-2015, 04:43 PM   #96
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Name: CIndy
Trailer: 82' Scamp 13
North Carolina
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So this seems like a good place to ask this question. The last owners cut a hole out in the back for the air conditioner. We are putting the air up in the front, so want to close this in. There is a piece of fg that they got from somewhere that they used to cover the hole when traveling. (See photos) it seems to match the curvature very nicely. We would like to use that piece for the repair but what is the best way to do this? What is the best way to join the two pieces together? Will this even work? Should we go about this a different way? So much to learn with our little project!
Thanks!
Cindy Click image for larger version

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Just realized I held the cover up upside down. :-/


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Old 01-25-2015, 05:02 PM   #97
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Cindi
You might consider putting a hatch (If you can find one to fit.) in the hole and you can have a outside storage area if you build a box between the seats. But you can't put your spare back there.
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Old 01-25-2015, 05:13 PM   #98
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Gotta say, you are in for a major project and a repaint of the entire trailer if you want the old hole to "disappear". As my philosophy on this kind of repair is set out in post #89 above, I won't repeat it here.


What I would do if this were my problem:
1. Take advantage of the hole and get a baggage compartment door and frame
that will take up the same space. Even if you don't use it, it will look like it belongs there, but you will find uses for it, like sticking that 12' totem pole you bought at a yard sale inside to take it home.


2. Get a fiberglass cloth and resin repair kit (such as a Bondo Kit) at a local auto supply store, carefully cut the patch to fit and using the kit, seal the patch into place from the inside only using resin and cloth strips per the instructions. Then find an appropriate size refrigerator vent panel, slightly larger than the repaired area and install that over the patch, thus eliminating the need to have a perfect looking repair and repainting.


Short of having the skill sets of a talented boat or RV fiberglass expert, that big a repair will not just not disappear, and you will still have a painting job ahead.


Good Luck



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Old 01-25-2015, 10:03 PM   #99
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Name: CIndy
Trailer: 82' Scamp 13
North Carolina
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I like the ideas about making it a hatch. The problem we are seeing with that is the curve of the scamp. At that place it curves side to side and top to bottom. Double whammy! Also it's quite large 15x22 ish.

We do plan on painting it so that's not a worry.




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Old 01-29-2015, 06:18 PM   #100
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Name: Caroline
Trailer: Itasca
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Just jumping on this thread now, I have never worked with fiberglass before, but I need to learn. Great thread. Thanks so much!!
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