Bigfoot 25B25RT Concerns - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-05-2020, 03:38 PM   #1
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Name: Ken
Trailer: In the market
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Bigfoot 25B25RT Concerns

I am new to this forum and will admit upfront that I have always wanted an Airstream since I could remember. Having said that I was also curious about molded fiberglass trailers and know that the molded fiberglass trailer owners are every bit as enthusiastic about their trailers as the Airstream crowd. The major stumbling block for me was size, most are just too small for extended camping, at least for my taste. Several months ago I came upon Bigfoot in my online research and was immediately intrigued with a molded fiberglass trailer that was 25' with decent width.

There is a dealer only a couple hours North of us in Abbotsford, BC, Get-Away RV, that just happened to have a couple 25' units on their lot so we recently drove up there to have a look. The gentleman who showed us the unit was very gracious and helpful. From viewing the trailer online my wife and I already kind of knew what we would like and would not like. We must have shown our distaste for the interior because the individual showing us the unit joked that we always say "Grant, you need to have some women help you out with your interiors" before we even uttered a word. My wife laughed and said my husband said the same thing earlier today. Actually what I said was "I think Oliver and Airstream must be the only manufacturers with women on their staff otherwise how do you explain the interiors of most units." I mean no offense here, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. My wife and I have tastes that run towards clean and modern. The Oliver Elite II and the International Serenity are both good examples of our taste in interiors. I even like the Escape 21' with the white walls and the blond wood cabinetry, cute as a button, too small. I had a nice conversation with Anita from Oliver and I told her "Please, please, please build a 25 or 27' with a little more width." She has probably heard this once or a thousand times and I have seen the same sentiments expressed on the Air Forums as well. If a 25 or 27' Oliver existed, I would be negotiating with them. Back to the Bigfoot though, The unit appears to be a very sturdy build with a lot of thought put into the operative aspects of the trailer, the additional storage unit in front of the trailer is brilliant. My heart tugs toward Airstream but my head is telling me pretty loud and clear that the Bigfoot is the more competent trailer in the long haul. The Airstream would likely be a beautiful PITA on wheels.

There was a recent thread on this trailer that answered a lot of my questions, but not all of them. First, has anyone out there done any interior modifications on one of these units? I know Get-Away RV does van conversions and the individual that showed us the unit said they could do interior modifications and that Grant may be open to some customization on a special order basis. We kind of left it at that. I would suppose you can do anything if you are willing to separate yourself from your hard earned cash. We are good with the Birch colored cabinets but the vinyl wall coverings, the carpet on the ceiling, and the window treatments just don't work for us. The Bigfoot is not an inexpensive unit by any means but remember we have budgeted for an Airstream and a 3/4 ton diesel truck so we are a little jaded in that regard. I think the Bigfoot would be worth the additional investment, within reason.

Do the exteriors of these units maintain their shiny gelcoat appearance over the years if properly maintained and stored. The AC unit at 11,000 btus seems a little smallish for a 25' trailer. We would want to go to the East side of the Cascades in the Summer and you will see triple digit temperatures in the Columbia basin. Anyone had any experience with this unit in very hot temperatures? Is the onboard Onan LP generator adequate to run the AC unit? Is it very noisy? I had always thought I would get twin Honda or Yamaha gas generators but the idea of not having to carry gasoline or going out in the cold to start and connect generators is kind of appealing. Is the Solar package worth the cost or might an aftermarket solar system be better?

Finally, we like the Twins configuration, we looked at the sideways Queen arrangement on the lot. We also would not bother with the ladder or the rack on the roof. I would appreciate any insight offered here. I also want to reiterate that I mean no offense regarding the interior of the trailer. The Bigfoot appears to be a very well constructed unit and you have every right to be proud of this unit if you are a current owner. Our plan is to retire in Whatcom County which is just South of the border so we would be within 30 miles of a dealership, Get-Away RV, and less than 300 miles from the factory which is another consideration for us.

Thank you all for your time.
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Old 01-05-2020, 05:07 PM   #2
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"Do the exteriors of these units maintain their shiny gelcoat appearance over the years if properly maintained and stored."

IME, its all about how its stored when not in use. Our two trailers spend there time in a carport and the other in a garage. And prior to our ownership, both were stored in garages.

Over time, sun and weather do a number on the gelcoat on FG trailers, as well as any plastic parts (think vents). Of course, you can clean and polish them.

Maintenance on the exterior of a molded FG trailer is easy peasy compared to an Airstream.

Solar is a VERY personal decision. Some of us prefer portable solar panels, others are fans of mounted panels. Rather than rehash this discussion, I would just do a search and read all the opinions.

The built in generator is not an inverter generator, so IMHO, they are noisier by design, and count on their storage area to muffle the sound. When you look at one, have them run the generator for you, and ramp up the load (turn on stuff). People will tell you they are quiet, others will say they are noisy. As an engineer, I prefer REAL noise data, rather than opinions. Often, generators are quiet for the owner that is inside their trailer. It is nearby campers who suffer from the noise.

Read up on recent Airstream quality issues. Might just talk you out of Airstream. Another disadvantage for you that could be an advantage to others is the distance to the factory. Seems like a lot of people take their Airstreams back to the factory for warranty work. The factory is in Ohio, so that is quite a trek for you. Of course, a local dealer could do warranty work.

I met another couple camping last summer in Colorado. They had a 2014 Escape 19, we have a 2013 Escape 19. The owner of the other rig asked what I used to polish my Escape. I told him, I have never polished it. He just about fell over. I took a look at his one year newer rig, wow, was the gelcoat faded and dull. So then I asked where he stored his trailer when it was not in use (outdoors, no cover). Bingo!

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f44/...am-166041.html
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Old 01-05-2020, 05:35 PM   #3
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I find the ladder/rack to be convenient for getting on the roof to check the sealant around vents. I feel less safe using a regular ladder since the roof is smooth and rounded and you end up pushing the ladder away from the trailer as you climb onto it.

Gel coat fades. Store in a garage or buy a cover. It can be repaired, but it isn't easy.

Derek
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Old 01-05-2020, 06:13 PM   #4
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Old 01-06-2020, 01:21 AM   #5
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Trailer: 2005 Bigfoot 25B25RQ (Sold: 1985 Scamp 13 & 1985 Scamp 16)
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Is it a home? Is it a trailer?

I would never decorate my home the way our 2005 Bigfoot 25 rear queen is decorated but there is a reason for many of the choices when it was made.

FLOORS: I have tile and wood floors in my home, in the trailer, vinyl! Why? Vinyl is easier to maintain and wood and tile is heavy and impractical. Options?--- Leave it as is or replace with vinyl looking wood floors! (which I did in my last fiberglass trailer)

WINDOWS and WINDOW COVERINGS: I have double pane windows in my home but they are not anti-reflective and they don't slide to open. At home, I have large grommet curtain panels in solid neutral color choices that fit the style of each room in my home. In the trailer, the windows are also double pane but have an antireflective coating. The trailer has day/night pleated shades (VERY NICE quality and practicality) but we also have dated, printed fabric covered cornice board tops and sides. Why? Temperature control for the windows and for the shades, stability while being towed, light filtering or privacy options, cornice boards hide and protect the edges of the shades. Options? Leave it as is or recover them to a fabric of my choosing, replace with alternate window coverings, remove the cornice boards. That would leave the shades vulnerable to damage though.

UPHOLSTERY: I have current, neutral solid-colored upholstery in my home. In the trailer, it is a thick, high quality but dated pattern (again, thankfully in neutral tones). Why? It's an older trailer and decor and tastes are different and change. Options? Leave it or get them recovered to a fabric of my choosing.

CEILINGS: My home has plaster ceilings, the trailer a marine headliner (carpet). Why? Improved insulation, good when you are in the hot sun and cold. I've been told that the ceiling covering material is very high-end and the kind you see used in expensive motorhomes and 5th wheels. Options? Leave it and appreciate the insulation it provides. Foolish to remove.

WALLCOVERING: My walls at home are painted in neutral tones of white and light gray, one room is tan. I have removed lots of outdated wallpaper from the previous owner when we bought the home in 1996. In the trailer, we have a dated neutral-colored faux finish vinyl wall covering. Why? A trailer gets dirty, bugs are swatted and leave bug juice, food and grease are splashed on the surface. Dust and smudges from touching the walls cause them to get dirty. Vinyl allows them to be cleaned easily and the neutral color hides the marks well until they are cleaned.

CABINETS: My cabinets at home are contemporary and many are white or a dark espresso. In the trailer they are brown oak and very traditional. I'm glad they are solid wood, have great hinges and stay closed! Options: Leave them as is or paint them white or stain them darker. (We do plan to do this soon. Just got our trailer last summer.)

FIXTURES AND HARDWARE: At home we have stylish light fixtures, bathroom fixtures and cabinet and door hardware. The trailer has plastic lights, fluorescent and LED. Cabinet pulls are shiny gold/chrome. Again, this is a 15-year-old trailer and trailers need to be kept lightweight. Options: Leave as is or update the lighting and hardware.

COUNTERS: At home, I have granite counters. Trailer... Formica. Why? Weight and practicality, cost etc. Options? Leave as is. Update, replace to a Formica of my choosing.

My point is this. Our trailer is older and the decor is outdated but thankfully fairly neutral. We add our own linens, wall decor, dinnerware, etc to express our style. We are also VERY pleased and impressed with the quality of the build compared to other trailers. We are living with the outdated decor for now with plans to only update a few things, nothing major. For us we remind ourselves that IT IS A TRAILER! It's not our house. We don't plan to spend months in it, just days and weeks. It provides a comfortable place to live while out on the road touring and camping. Most trailers in the USA don't ever look stylish. (Europeans do a better job of modern decor in their RV's.) Our trailer is most definitely practical and we love it, we can't wait to use it again in the spring, even though it looks nothing like our home!

One more thing...keep the roof rack and ladder for safety reasons as you'll need to get up there to do routine maintenance.

Good luck with your decisions! No matter what an RV looks like, it doesn't change how much fun the owner has!

Julie
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Old 01-06-2020, 09:35 AM   #6
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Trailer: 2020 25 RQ
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Who did you speak to @ Get Away? We were fortunate enough to deal with Dean Saxbee. I have encouraged two friends to "go through him" and they were happy with their purchases.

Simply put: Bigfoot wins hands down. Are there "things" that they could improve on...sure. But the overall quality of BF exceeds any other manufacturer.

Yes, you can make modifications to the interior, but speak with Dean regarding the extent you can go.

Carpet on the ceiling is less an insulation item than a noise reduction element, particularly when it's raining and you're trying to sleep!

Eliminate the rack...just more holes and eliminates potential leaks.

Do yourself the pleasure and travel to Armstrong and take a tour of the factory with Grant.

I took a friend ( who owned a Lance ) to the factory last year. He stood back while my wife and I questioned Grant three ways to Sunday ( p.s...we were already BF owners).

By the end of the summer, our friend was so impressed with the BF from A-Z, he ordered one....trading his Lance in at Get Away.

PM me if you have any questions.

We are now owners of a 2020 25 RQ....garage kept.
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Old 01-06-2020, 10:58 AM   #7
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Bigfoot 25B25RT Concerns

The way I see it, this is a mind vs. heart issue. Yes the Bigfoot is not only a better-built trailer, but it will be a lot more comfortable in heat and cold, and a much better value, both at purchase and at resale. You could buy it and redo the interior décor with the money you save over a similar-sized Airstream. Every rational argument points to the Bigfoot.

But you said you have wanted an Airstream for as long as you can remember. That's a heart issue that transcends reason. I think you should follow your heart. Buy an Airstream. Travel. Attend the rallies and enjoy the Airstream community. Live your dream.

One of two things will happen. You may love the Airstream every bit as much as you expect. If you love something you'll enjoy it, use it, take care of it, overlook its faults, and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. On the other hand, you may find it loses its luster after a few years' use, and the shortcomings outweigh the things that attract you now. Sell it and buy the BIgfoot- or perhaps something else you discover in your journeys that suits your style even better- with no regrets.

If I had the means and desire to buy a new Airstream, I'd personally skip the new ones in favor of a fully refurbished older one. They're out there, and if done well, may cost as much as new. However, they can have much higher quality worksmanship, unique and special, standing out in a sea of silver at the rallies. I've seen some stunning ones, but it may take some patient searching.

Just my 2 cents. Take it at face value. Best wishes in your travels, whatever you decide!
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Old 01-06-2020, 11:37 AM   #8
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For some reason, so many with limited trailer experience, seem to immediately think that bigger is better. As soon as they see a trailer, they want a bigger one, even if the manufacturer doesn't even make a bigger one. Why is bigger so often seen as better?

Bigger might mean more interior room, but it doesn't mean a better layout, or more practical equipment. Bigger also means much more weight and the resultant harder towing and a bigger tow vehicle with higher operating costs. The bigger the tow vehicle the less use it has for things other than just towing the trailer. Wider also means harder towing. Visibility and keeping it in the lane become more difficult. Narrow dirt roads become harder to get through without scratching it up. The difference between a 7' wide trailer and an 8' Airstream is significant while towing.

How much interior room is needed? Do you want a weekend luxury apartment, or a practical travel trailer that is easy to live with?

Airstreams are luxurious and famous for their design. But they are extremely fragile. The exterior can be dented by pushing on it with your hand. Hail can destroy them. Imagine traveling and always having to avoid the possibility of ever getting into a hail storm. They are good if you plan to be plugged in every night, but what if you want to be off-grid for a week? The ones I've seen had one small battery. They are also OK if price is not an issue. But they seem to be about twice the cost of other high quality, new fiberglass trailers. But, they are beautiful, depending on how much you factor function into the beauty equation. The decision is a personal one based on how someone wants to use it and the restrictions that come with larger trailers. For instance, some parks limit the length of trailers, or have many short sites that can be too small to fit into. The Mobile Bay Ferry in Alabama limits the length of trailers they'll allow on board, some sites in Yosemite are almost impossible to get into with larger or wider trailers. Even stopping at supermarkets, or restaurants, with larger, wider trailers requires special parking away from the busy areas. If you go to National Parks to see the sights, what difference does it make if the trailer is longer of shorter, as long as it's comfortable?

Initial cost, the required tow vehicle, the intended use, the practicality, the durability, and the potential for fun, all factor in. Do you want to travel in groups, be in a park every night, explore more remote places, live off grid for a week at a time, join a club, have a base camp, travel with a large or growing family, retire on the road, want the prestige of owning an Airstream, or just want some fun times camping. Do you plan to resell it in a couple of years or keep it forever? Do you want to be able to go at the drop of a hat, or plan for weeks in advance? Travel only in summer, or go in winter too? Do you want to go off-road, or smaller back roads, or only travel on the highway?
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Old 01-06-2020, 11:41 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
The way I see it, this is a mind vs. heart issue. Yes the Bigfoot is not only a better-built trailer, but it will be a lot more comfortable in heat and cold, and a much better value, both at purchase and at resale. You could buy it and redo the interior décor with the money you save over a similar-sized Airstream. Every rational argument points to the Bigfoot.

But you said you have wanted an Airstream for as long as you can remember. That's a heart issue that transcends reason. I think you should follow your heart. Buy an Airstream. Enjoy the Airstream community. Attend the rallies. Live your dream.

One of two things will happen. You may love the Airstream so much you overlook its shortcomings. Every RV type and brand has its share, including molded fiberglass. If you love something you'll enjoy it, use it, take care of it, overlook its defects, and it becomes a self-fulfilling prophesy. On the other hand, you may decide after a few years' use that the shine has lost its luster, and the shortcomings outweigh the things that attract you to it now. Sell it then and buy a Bigfoot with zero regrets.

If I had the means and the heart to buy a new Airstream, I'd personally skip the new ones in favor of a fully refurbished older one. They're out there, and if done well, may cost as much as new. However, they can have much higher quality worksmanship, unique and special, standing out in a sea of silver at the rallies. I've seen some stunning ones, but it may take some patient searching.

Just my 2 cents. Take it at face value. Best wishes in your travels, whatever you decide!
Jon,

Excellent post. Follow your heart or always regret it.
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Old 01-06-2020, 11:55 AM   #10
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Your post reminded me of the time we were on a Boy Scout high adventure. We stopped in a fairly large town in Kentucky for supplies. I had anticipated getting food for a cookout back at our campsite. One of the other adults had other ideas and when I stated my idea, he said he thought we ought to go to a smorgasbord restaurant. I foolishly said we ought to let the boys decide. Before I could say more he called out to the Scouts “ what do you want for dinner boys, a smorgasbord with unlimited food or a wiener on a stick?” We went to the smorgasboard. Such is the choice in how we camp. I’ve had some pretty fine evenings in front of a fire with a stick in my hand and a sunset on the horizon. Smorgasboard restaurants with the exception of Bettys at Niagara Falls not so much.
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Old 01-06-2020, 12:33 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Julie T. View Post
I would never decorate my home the way our 2005 Bigfoot 25 rear queen is decorated but there is a reason for many of the choices when it was made.

FLOORS: I have tile and wood floors in my home, in the trailer, vinyl! Why? Vinyl is easier to maintain and wood and tile is heavy and impractical. Options?--- Leave it as is or replace with vinyl looking wood floors! (which I did in my last fiberglass trailer)

WINDOWS and WINDOW COVERINGS: I have double pane windows in my home but they are not anti-reflective and they don't slide to open. At home, I have large grommet curtain panels in solid neutral color choices that fit the style of each room in my home. In the trailer, the windows are also double pane but have an antireflective coating. The trailer has day/night pleated shades (VERY NICE quality and practicality) but we also have dated, printed fabric covered cornice board tops and sides. Why? Temperature control for the windows and for the shades, stability while being towed, light filtering or privacy options, cornice boards hide and protect the edges of the shades. Options? Leave it as is or recover them to a fabric of my choosing, replace with alternate window coverings, remove the cornice boards. That would leave the shades vulnerable to damage though.

UPHOLSTERY: I have current, neutral solid-colored upholstery in my home. In the trailer, it is a thick, high quality but dated pattern (again, thankfully in neutral tones). Why? It's an older trailer and decor and tastes are different and change. Options? Leave it or get them recovered to a fabric of my choosing.

CEILINGS: My home has plaster ceilings, the trailer a marine headliner (carpet). Why? Improved insulation, good when you are in the hot sun and cold. I've been told that the ceiling covering material is very high-end and the kind you see used in expensive motorhomes and 5th wheels. Options? Leave it and appreciate the insulation it provides. Foolish to remove.

WALLCOVERING: My walls at home are painted in neutral tones of white and light gray, one room is tan. I have removed lots of outdated wallpaper from the previous owner when we bought the home in 1996. In the trailer, we have a dated neutral-colored faux finish vinyl wall covering. Why? A trailer gets dirty, bugs are swatted and leave bug juice, food and grease are splashed on the surface. Dust and smudges from touching the walls cause them to get dirty. Vinyl allows them to be cleaned easily and the neutral color hides the marks well until they are cleaned.

CABINETS: My cabinets at home are contemporary and many are white or a dark espresso. In the trailer they are brown oak and very traditional. I'm glad they are solid wood, have great hinges and stay closed! Options: Leave them as is or paint them white or stain them darker. (We do plan to do this soon. Just got our trailer last summer.)

FIXTURES AND HARDWARE: At home we have stylish light fixtures, bathroom fixtures and cabinet and door hardware. The trailer has plastic lights, fluorescent and LED. Cabinet pulls are shiny gold/chrome. Again, this is a 15-year-old trailer and trailers need to be kept lightweight. Options: Leave as is or update the lighting and hardware.

COUNTERS: At home, I have granite counters. Trailer... Formica. Why? Weight and practicality, cost etc. Options? Leave as is. Update, replace to a Formica of my choosing.

My point is this. Our trailer is older and the decor is outdated but thankfully fairly neutral. We add our own linens, wall decor, dinnerware, etc to express our style. We are also VERY pleased and impressed with the quality of the build compared to other trailers. We are living with the outdated decor for now with plans to only update a few things, nothing major. For us we remind ourselves that IT IS A TRAILER! It's not our house. We don't plan to spend months in it, just days and weeks. It provides a comfortable place to live while out on the road touring and camping. Most trailers in the USA don't ever look stylish. (Europeans do a better job of modern decor in their RV's.) Our trailer is most definitely practical and we love it, we can't wait to use it again in the spring, even though it looks nothing like our home!

One more thing...keep the roof rack and ladder for safety reasons as you'll need to get up there to do routine maintenance.

Good luck with your decisions! No matter what an RV looks like, it doesn't change how much fun the owner has!

Julie
Excellent and pretty much nothing left out ! Pat
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Old 01-06-2020, 12:39 PM   #12
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Trailer: Escape 2013 19 ft
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
For some reason, so many with limited trailer experience, seem to immediately think that bigger is better. As soon as they see a trailer, they want a bigger one, even if the manufacturer doesn't even make a bigger one. Why is bigger so often seen as better?

Bigger might mean more interior room, but it doesn't mean a better layout, or more practical equipment. Bigger also means much more weight and the resultant harder towing and a bigger tow vehicle with higher operating costs. The bigger the tow vehicle the less use it has for things other than just towing the trailer. Wider also means harder towing. Visibility and keeping it in the lane become more difficult. Narrow dirt roads become harder to get through without scratching it up. The difference between a 7' wide trailer and an 8' Airstream is significant while towing.

How much interior room is needed? Do you want a weekend luxury apartment, or a practical travel trailer that is easy to live with?

Airstreams are luxurious and famous for their design. But they are extremely fragile. The exterior can be dented by pushing on it with your hand. Hail can destroy them. Imagine traveling and always having to avoid the possibility of ever getting into a hail storm. They are good if you plan to be plugged in every night, but what if you want to be off-grid for a week? The ones I've seen had one small battery. They are also OK if price is not an issue. But they seem to be about twice the cost of other high quality, new fiberglass trailers. But, they are beautiful, depending on how much you factor function into the beauty equation. The decision is a personal one based on how someone wants to use it and the restrictions that come with larger trailers. For instance, some parks limit the length of trailers, or have many short sites that can be too small to fit into. The Mobile Bay Ferry in Alabama limits the length of trailers they'll allow on board, some sites in Yosemite are almost impossible to get into with larger or wider trailers. Even stopping at supermarkets, or restaurants, with larger, wider trailers requires special parking away from the busy areas. If you go to National Parks to see the sights, what difference does it make if the trailer is longer of shorter, as long as it's comfortable?

Initial cost, the required tow vehicle, the intended use, the practicality, the durability, and the potential for fun, all factor in. Do you want to travel in groups, be in a park every night, explore more remote places, live off grid for a week at a time, join a club, have a base camp, travel with a large or growing family, retire on the road, want the prestige of owning an Airstream, or just want some fun times camping. Do you plan to resell it in a couple of years or keep it forever? Do you want to be able to go at the drop of a hat, or plan for weeks in advance? Travel only in summer, or go in winter too? Do you want to go off-road, or smaller back roads, or only travel on the highway?
Size is a important consideration. New RV owners think they need more and that is better . I guess they will find out on their own . Pat
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Old 01-06-2020, 02:10 PM   #13
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Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
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All RV's will have issues, some more than others. We went to Airstream dealerships a number of times looking for an Airstream. Each time finding issues that the dealership said they would rectify after the trailer is purchased. Each time we left feeling that the AS was just not up to our standards. Finally decided on the model we wanted, gritted our teeth and went to the AS dealership to purchase. Found what we wanted. Once again the quality issues were obvious. While we waited for the salesman to return to us we came upon a new Big Foot 25RQ. The AS dealership had just taken on the BF brand, the second or third BF dealership east of the Mississippi. We looked it over, went home about 180 miles away, thought about it, went back the next week and looked the BF over more intensely and bought it. Did it have a few minor issues, sure, but not nearly as many or as important as the AS, or any other trailers we had looked at such as the Nash and Arctic Fox (which also did not have many issues).

Why? Built like a tank and no obvious issues. After we lived with it for a while a couple of minor things popped up, which the company or I addressed. Very satisfied, although I am fine tuning the unit as it were.
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Old 01-06-2020, 05:17 PM   #14
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Trailer: R-Vision & In the market
Massachusetts
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Twin Beds

I have a 25TB on order and should be getting it inside of two months. I agree with you about the AC unit. They also get $1000 for the AC so I ordered mine without AC. That will be my first project. I should be able to do a 15000 BTU with heat pump for that $1000.

Did you know the TB models have storage on both sides in the rear accessible from inside and out. I have spent more time thinking about the kitchen sink. One bowl or two, I finally decided on two and after using it for a while I may decide to redo the counter top. Who knows.

I have noticed that the 21RB has more room in the kitchen than the 25. Rats. The shower in the 25 though is what sold me. When I get mine I will do photos and videos if anyone wants.....Thomas C
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Old 01-06-2020, 06:57 PM   #15
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Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
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Tom the 25RQ is a 30 amp unit. Did you upgrade to 50 amp service? If not, will the 30 amp service handle the 15K AC unit you plan to install?
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Old 01-06-2020, 08:08 PM   #16
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Trailer: 2019 Oliver Elite II
Texas
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Coming from a Casita and wanting a larger trailer we spent several hours at the Airstream dealer and trying to decide on the Airstream (23D), or a larger fiberglass travel trailer. Our only choices in the fiberglass market were the Escape, Bigfoot, and the Oliver and after much deliberation the Oliver became our choice, it's just way over the top in construction and quality. If I lived in Canada I probably would have gone with the Bigfoot over the Escape, but am totally happy with our Oliver.

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Old 01-06-2020, 08:10 PM   #17
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Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
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Trainman you have a very fine trailer indeed. Having a 17" Casita we wanted something a bit larger. It's too bad the Oliver does not come just a bit longer, no wider, just longer.
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Old 01-06-2020, 09:10 PM   #18
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Name: Mike
Trailer: Escape 21 & Jeep GC 5.7 (Previous 2012 Casita FD17 & 2010 Audi Q5)
Puget Sound, WA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken in Washington View Post
I am new to this forum and will admit upfront that I have always wanted an Airstream since I could remember. Having said that I was also curious about molded fiberglass trailers and know that the molded fiberglass trailer owners are every bit as enthusiastic about their trailers as the Airstream crowd. The major stumbling block for me was size, most are just too small for extended camping, at least for my taste. Several months ago I came upon Bigfoot in my online research and was immediately intrigued with a molded fiberglass trailer that was 25' with decent width.
I was also very taken by the Airstream design aesthetic, long before I had any real interest in RVs or travel trailers. We looked closely at the 23FB; compared to the "similarly sized" molded fiberglass units, the 23 came up short on gray/black storage tank capacity, refrigerator capacity, and carrying capacity as best I recall.

On the plus side, their upholstered seats look to be very nice. The square cushions in most trailers are designed to allow making them into a "bed", at the sacrifice of sitting comfort.

Escape has been working on a larger trailer design. Maybe your purchasing time frame would allow for exploring that option - ?
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Old 01-06-2020, 09:25 PM   #19
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Name: bill
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+10 If your dream is to own an Airstream, I say go for it. In the end, its your happiness that matters.
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Old 01-06-2020, 11:37 PM   #20
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Name: Ken
Trailer: In the market
SEATTLE
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Thank you for all the responses

I did not mean to raise hackles by mentioning Airstream. I wanted to talk about the Bigfoot trailer. There are much less hostile forums for talking Airstream if that was the intention.

Thrifty Bill, when we went to look at the Bigfoot a pristine older Bigfoot Motor Home was going through the border just North of Lynden in front of us. I told me wife it had to be pre-2008 so your comment about proper storage and the condition of the exterior is well taken. You also talked me out of an on-board generator.

Russ, I looked at the card of the individual we talked to at GetAway, it was not Dean Saxbee but I will get in touch with Dean. We would like to go up to Armstrong to see the factory. It is a little bit of a haul from Seattle to drive and I am still working full-time. There are commuter flights out of Vancouver to Vernon and that might be one way we could do it without incurring so much driving time. Thanks again for the info Russ, that is good stuff!

Thomas C, I am with you on the twin beds. My wife and I have both had surgeries where walking around a sideways Queen bed is less than ideal for us. We are used to a King bed at home. A wide aisle down the middle that leads straight to the latrine works for us. I know that a 13,500 btu AC unit will work with 30amp service and I have heard that twinned Honda or Yamaha inverter generators will start this unit.

Jon in AZ, thank you for the philosophical words. You made me chuckle. Matters of the heart do transcend reason all too often, except when they don't. We would like to get this right the first time. It was much easier to rebound from mistakes when I was a young man, now not so much.

Trainman, congratulations on your Oliver. When it comes to the interior of a molded fiberglass trailer Oliver got it exactly right in the humble opinion of my wife and I. Beautiful trailer, enjoy!

Finally, Yes Civilguy, I do have some time as I am still working. I will keep an eye out for the larger Escape unit.
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