Composting Toilet for Casita Spirit Deluxe - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 03-16-2020, 11:22 AM   #21
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Wink

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Originally Posted by Stephen_Albers View Post
I've made exactly the toilet swap you propose. Though yet to be placed into service, it looks like a great success. I converted the black water tank to freshwater too.
Hope you actually removed that tank and replaced with a new one and not just converted it
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Old 03-16-2020, 01:43 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Stephen_Albers View Post
I've made exactly the toilet swap you propose. Though yet to be placed into service, it looks like a great success. I converted the black water tank to freshwater too.
I don't think the black water tank is for drinking water. Even if never used. That is why the tanks have different colors. Drinking water must be in a tank that is food grade and black water tanks are not food grade. So don't use your water for cooking, drinking, making coffee, brushing teeth, etc.
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Old 03-16-2020, 02:06 PM   #23
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Bob, comparing a composting toilet to an outhouse as Steve did, is not just comparing apples to oranges, it's more like comparing apples to Brussels sprouts. They are NOTHING alike.
The outhouse mixes solids and liquids, which produces sewage and STINK. A composting toilet separates solids from liquids, thus allowing the solids to dehydrate, which virtually eliminates the odor.
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Old 03-16-2020, 02:36 PM   #24
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Yeah, I've never gotten a single smell out of my composter. The tiny 12v fan takes whatever smells there could be right out to the outside.
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Old 03-16-2020, 02:46 PM   #25
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Yeah, I've never gotten a single smell out of my composter. The tiny 12v fan takes whatever smells there could be right out to the outside.

How do your neighbours feel about that?
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Old 03-16-2020, 02:48 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by LyleB View Post
Bob, comparing a composting toilet to an outhouse as Steve did, is not just comparing apples to oranges, it's more like comparing apples to Brussels sprouts. They are NOTHING alike.
The outhouse mixes solids and liquids, which produces sewage and STINK. A composting toilet separates solids from liquids, thus allowing the solids to dehydrate, which virtually eliminates the odor.
So when it's time to empty the trailer toilet, the poop is dehydrated and doesn't smell? If that's the case you could probably just put it in any convenient flower bed!
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Old 03-16-2020, 02:56 PM   #27
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Lyle, I agree with you. Also adding lime would kill the composting process.



I come from an era when the Sears catalog and outhouses were common. Thus the lime was used. Also outhouses were moved from time to time as the holes filled up. You always made sure your outhouse was down hill from your water well.



My research of compositing toilets of various makes all report the only smell they get is maybe the compositing material itself. I.e.: coconut coir, peat most, sawdust, etc. In the case of the Nature's Head compositing toilet, the compositing is sped up with the fan circulating air thru the composting bin helping to dry out what moisture there is in the compost. I understand the fan also helps to minimize/eliminate the potential for the "white flies".



The only material added to the compositing toilet is more composting material when and if needed. No chemicals or deodorizers of any type are used. Definitely no liquids which hinders the compositing process.


I think that Jann is correct about the black water tank not being suitable for fresh water. Though if the shower were plumbed directly to the black water tank, I think it could serve in that capacity without any health hazards. Leaving the fresh water tank itself to all kitchen uses.


I dry brush my teeth, so I don't use water for that. On the few occasions where I need water, I would use the kitchen sink.
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Old 03-16-2020, 04:02 PM   #28
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No, it's not recommended that we use composted human waste in gardens. But, it's not going to add some ungodly chemical into the environment when we dispose of it in the landfill.
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Old 03-16-2020, 04:35 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jann Todd View Post
I don't think the black water tank is for drinking water. Even if never used. That is why the tanks have different colors. Drinking water must be in a tank that is food grade and black water tanks are not food grade. So don't use your water for cooking, drinking, making coffee, brushing teeth, etc.
Was told by Ronco plastics which manufacturers all tanks for Happier Camper that all tanks are of the same composition and only difference is the color added and all tanks are safe for potable water.
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Old 03-16-2020, 06:17 PM   #30
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No Shelby, when it comes out of the toilet, it is dehydrated, not composted. It needs to go through about six months to a year of proper composting to be safe to use as fertilizer. Do NOT dump your toilet around shrubs or flowerbeds.
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Old 03-16-2020, 06:56 PM   #31
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Well that's a shame. It would be convenient if campgrounds would set up composting bins for proper disposal so folks wouldn't have to haul it home to complete the process.
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Old 03-17-2020, 08:03 AM   #32
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poop

This poop thing is sort of funny. Arkansas just banned a huge hog CAFO and don't think those aren't dangerous?

So they had over a million gals of liquid hog poop to dispose of. Their answer take it to Missouri and apply it on a pasture! 1300gals to an acre think about that one? Think what is going to happen as the rains fall and big showers the run off?

Anyway those hogs are fed all sorts of growth hormones and who knows what else and they are allowed to dump it about anywhere! We have farmers here who buy sfuff out of human lagoons and apply it to farm ground.

So I question if a small amount of dehydrated poop is going to hurt much as it is now completely through our food supply anyway!

bob

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Originally Posted by CASITA BANANA View Post
No, it's not recommended that we use composted human waste in gardens. But, it's not going to add some ungodly chemical into the environment when we dispose of it in the landfill.
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Old 03-17-2020, 11:48 AM   #33
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I wonder if the dehydrated mixture of poop and vegetation could be burned in a fire pit w/o stinking out the neighbors. I think buffalo chips made good fires while they lasted. Buffalo probably ate more fiber than we do so the composition might be similar.
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Old 03-21-2020, 10:34 AM   #34
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Thanks for checking on my "overlander" Casita project. Here is a brief update. The new aft awning has been fitted and the entire unit with the new frame, suspension, et al has now been successfully road-tested to 75 mph for 10 minutes. The new double-pane windows provide comfortable 70F accommodation with an OAT of 108F in the Texas sun with air conditioning cycling off and on by the thermostat. Everyone is very pleased. The holdup is now with the electrical system upgrade. It will provide campervan lithium capability. But design issues and parts availability is slowing things down. Remember, the goal is a total boondocking capability on unimproved roads, 4-season (-20F to +120F). More later.
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Old 03-21-2020, 10:46 AM   #35
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Fabulous! Some of the newest Class Bs really do have impressive battery capacity.
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Old 03-21-2020, 11:05 AM   #36
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The same 2 or 3 that know little enough to compare an engineered compost toilet to an outhouse and have more than likely never seen a Nature's Head or an Airhead will continue their uneducated babble on this subject. Many thousands are in use in Rv's including Oliver and Airstream among others. I installed a Natures Head and plumbed the wet side to my factory black tank in my 2017 Casita. That some on here apparently aren't interested in extending the usefulness of their camper and boondock to areas I frequent on a regular basis is ok by me, I don't care how they camp and have no intention of telling them how to camp. I can say my personal experience with my Nature's Head has be a positive one and has less odor and maintenance than my factory toilet had. I have had numerous trips now that far exceeds 60 days with out any services and yet I still have all the ammonites of the factory set up. One trip to Alaska, Newfoundland and similar remote areas will show one the advantages of self sufficiency and bring a level of comfort that the factory set up cannot.
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Old 03-21-2020, 11:22 AM   #37
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Natureís Head of the class

I don’t use a toilet in my Burro but have been an owner of composting toilets in my Alaskan home for more than 25 years.
All “composting” toilets are glorified sawdust toilets. None truly compost but involve a preliminary stage of the process.
I’ve built and used dozens of sawdust toilets and they’re odor-free, inexpensive and require no vents. They do need more sawdust and emptying and the solids are not broken down at all, needing more attention than if dried. Great for short-term economic use.
I had a Sun-Mar in my home for 18 years and it was a mess. Maintenance was heavy and I had to get into it up to my elbows dozens of times. Expensive and poorly designed. Then I got fed up and for the past 4 years I’ve had a Natures Head. I’m absolutely delighted with the upgrade.
Though I’ve never used the C-Head I believe the Natures Head is a superior product with less maintenance. It costs a few hundred dollars more (they’re ALL overpriced) but the NH has noteworthy advantages. As stated by another in an earlier post, I simply turn the side crank 2-3 times with my foot after each use. The urine tank is at least twice the size of the CH and requires less emptying. I put a 1/2 cup of vinegar in the urine chamber after emptying to retard crystallization and keeps the walls clean. The vented fan is much more effective drying out the solids and takes little energy to run. Emptying the solids is quite easy: every 6-8 weeks I remove the lid, wrap a kitchen waste bag over the mouth, turn it over and tap the base a few times. To refill no rinsing is required and a I add a couple gallons of peat moss. Never a smell- even from the waste bag full of solids. The solids are mostly dried out from the peat and fan-vented moisture. And at 28 lbs. with a low profile I don’t see size as a big variable.
I can’t think of a more valid endorsement than to say it’s my home’s only throne.
PS. Natures Head Can be left unplugged for long periods without causing any smell.
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Old 03-21-2020, 11:23 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
We have a composting toilet at our home in Northern Wisconsin
We donít have a fancy yuppie sounding name for it , we just call it the ďOUTHOUSEĒ
I will admit itís easy to maintain , just a little barn lime once in a while but I wonít try to BS anyone about the smell
I suppose I could hook the outhouse behind my trailer and drag it along but I havenít figured out how to bring the hole along with it

Well maybe I could give it a fancy environmentally sounding name ,add a few blinking LED
lights and add a computer monitor and pass it off as the newest technological advance in waste disposal ?
nope, your outhouse has little to do with a composting toilet: in your hole, you have a sloshy mix of liquids and solids, stewing away with anaerobic bacteria that stink. My composting toilet, on the other hand, separates liquids & solids, and is well-ventilated, so its aerobic bacteria taking care of the decomposition. Using cococoir to cover things, mine DOES NOT SMELL. Period.
13ft Scamp with home-built composting toilet mounted in lieu of the (STINKY) marine toilet that it came with originally
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Old 03-21-2020, 11:25 AM   #39
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I like the idea of plumbing the wet to the tank! Still would like to hear good ideas for dealing with the poop since it apparently is far from being actual compost.
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Old 03-21-2020, 11:29 AM   #40
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When I consulted with my marine sanitation expert about composting options he advocated the AirHead over the other available options.

I don't know if he's worked with the C Head since, but the points of both the Nature's Head and the AirHead were discussed. There was another that I don't remember the name of, but it was a more primitive option that was not suggested.

Having also talked in person and online with folks who use the AirHead, it seems like a great product.

One thing we are researching is the possibility of plumbing the fluid side into the greywater, and how to keep it from smelling like urine. Dilution, aeration, and enzymes might be the trick, best I can tell. Will be testing urine processing where we have regular plumbing before spending on it.
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