New Stove ( almost ) - Fiberglass RV


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Old 04-10-2007, 04:18 PM   #1
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I had the stove in the Companion powdercoated recently and it looks like new !!!

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Old 04-10-2007, 04:28 PM   #2
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That looks really cool. Where did you go to have that done, and what did it cost? I wonder if you could do the icebox or fridge door at the same time?

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Old 04-10-2007, 05:02 PM   #3
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I had one of my stove tops powdercoated.. ( I think in the 16ft) I was really happy with the way it turned out..... it was so clean and new looking i didnt even use it..!! LOL
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Old 04-10-2007, 05:57 PM   #4
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RED..

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Old 04-10-2007, 06:28 PM   #5
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Does HEAT bother the powdercoating?
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:15 PM   #6
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Doug, thats part of the powder coating process! It LIKES heat!
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:35 PM   #7
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Check with your local hot rod shop. They will know who does powder coating in your area. Tom Trostel
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:36 PM   #8
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It would be easier just to find out who does powder coating then to have to find the local hot rod shop, first!

But I love that powder coated stove....


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Old 04-10-2007, 09:42 PM   #9
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Powder Coating is pretty spendy, especially for a one off piece like this. IF you find a shop that is willing to do it, try to see if they have other parts to do that are the same material and get a common color that they are running with that material. This will make your stove top just another part to them. Like materials will prep the same, and after that, parts is parts. Thats why going thru a car shop or similar business would be easier, cheaper and faster.. "How do we do it? VOLUME"

Like with anything else, it's all in the prep. Ask Fred
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:44 PM   #10
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WONDERFUL!
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Old 04-10-2007, 09:45 PM   #11
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K L, I've had my furnace front cover done, but was always afraid to fire it up due to possible discoloration issues....
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Old 04-10-2007, 10:19 PM   #12
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I had the stove in the Companion powdercoated recently and it looks like new !!!

Karen K.
I worked for a manufacturing company that had a powder coating line in 1990. If I remember correctly the parts spent 1.5 hours going through an oven at 450F to cure the powder, so it should work well on a stove top. We used it on lawnmowers and snowblowers and it seemed almost bullet proof. In the beginning we found the powder filling tapped and clearance holes in sheet metal parts and screws would break rather than dislodge the baked paint. All our components had to have oversized holes added to overcome the problems at assembly. We had the capability of using 3 different colors on this line but we became so busy that we ran only black paint 24/7 and used our wet line to paint other colors. When we tried to find additional powder capacity outside we couldn't find many people doing anything but black. The minimum purchase for a different color was several hundred dollars because it came in skid sized boxes, so a single item is usually prohibitively expensive unless you can find someone with stock in the color you want. There is also a lengthy clean up process each time you change colors on a line to factor in as well.
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Old 04-10-2007, 10:20 PM   #13
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Powder Coating is pretty spendy, especially for a one off piece like this. IF you find a shop that is willing to do it, try to see if they have other parts to do that are the same material and get a common color that they are running with that material. This will make your stove top just another part to them.
It would be cool to do the fridge, stove-top, and furnace, if you have one. I want that color in my new house when I build it, maybe I can do the trailer parts at the same time. I've heard of people having their stove done.

But this site has estimated prices...

http://www.powderperfect.com/pricelist.asp

and says they cannot do stove tops. Maybe there is some kind of problem with heat?

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Old 04-10-2007, 10:37 PM   #14
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Like with anything else, it's all in the prep. [b]Ask Fred
My advise is to make friends with your local Hell's Wheels Chapter, or Harley Motorcycle Gang!

At least one of the members will be a machinist/welder who is a control freak, and will only accept work done his way; that's why he has a complete metalworking shop in his garage. All of his buddies hang out at his place working on their bikes. If they race, or into motorcross, so much the better! They will fall in love with your trailer, and you might become useful to them since you have a trailer hitch; they will invite you to attend the races, and oh-by-the-way can you haul their flatbed trailer for them? Offer to buy everybody lunch on a Saturday, and they will teach you how to strip old paint, sand blast, and powder coat. Do your 1st item poorly, and your new friends will take over and complete the job for you, perfectly. No charge for labor.

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Old 04-10-2007, 10:40 PM   #15
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Great plan, and I already know one of those guys.

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Old 04-10-2007, 11:04 PM   #16
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Bobbie, If they can do valve covers, I am not sure why they wouldn't do stove tops.

Like Bill said, it's practically bullet proof. Thats why it is so common on items that get abused, both physically AND thru heat exposure.

Perhaps a concentrated heat in one area may cause eventual discoloration or damage, or perhaps some toxic gassing when heated like that with the type of powder they use.

There are a variety of powders and compositions used, almost like different types of paint. They each have thier own best spec for material coatings before hand, thickness, gloss factor, texture and how long they should be baked at what temp for what type of material it should be on.
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Old 04-11-2007, 06:17 AM   #17
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The place that did the powdercoat was the High-Lift jack factory near where we live. The only color choices are red or black. The man who owns the company is a friend of a friend so the cost was nil.

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Old 04-11-2007, 06:41 AM   #18
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Bobbie, If they can do valve covers, I am not sure why they wouldn't do stove tops.
It probably has more to do with size than anything...and the term "Stove Top," may have to do with a home stove/oven which will be 36 to 40 inches. There are some people still trying to change from Avocado Green!
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Old 04-11-2007, 09:01 AM   #19
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It probably has more to do with size than anything...and the term "Stove Top," may have to do with a home stove/oven which will be 36 to 40 inches. There are some people still trying to change from Avocado Green!
They list things of all sizes. I read on another site that stove tops were a problem because of the flames doing something to the powder coating.

Years ago, I painted an avocado green stove with wood stove paint. It worked. It chipped a lot (as I hadn't really been able to abrade the surface) but I just touched it up now and then (it was a spray paint.) I'm not suggesting that- it wasn't the best solution- but the heat was not a problem with it.

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Old 04-11-2007, 06:04 PM   #20
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I don't cook inside anyways, don't want to mess things up. I like to cook on the fire and carry about 50 lbs ( haha) of cast iron cookware in the camper. The stove's just for purdy.

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