Old Burro - Fiberglass RV
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Old 09-24-2022, 02:23 PM   #1
Member
 
Name: Duane
Trailer: 1978 Burro
Michigan
Posts: 93
Old Burro

I finally figured out how to stiffin the door and shape it to the body. It was the 4th time I worked on the door to make it fit good. I cut the door into 3 pieces since only the middle of the door fit nicely to the body. I used 1x pieces of wood to make the door stiff and used resin to secure the 1x into the slots I cut.

It was a little tricky but I wanted the door to fit well. I cut off about 2 inches at the bottom of the door and extended the floor out to meet the bottom of the door.

I put marine primer and paint on the inside and outside of the body and now just have to prime and paint the door this winter.
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Old 09-25-2022, 04:32 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Name: Gary
Trailer: UHaul CT13
Iowa
Posts: 302
Wow! What do say to that amount of effort?
My grandmother was a school teacher in rural NE Iowa in the early 1900s, and used to cite little snippets of poems all the time, including the following:

It Couldn't Be Done
by
Edgar Guest [known as "the people's pet"]

Somebody said that it couldn’t be done
But he with a chuckle replied
That “maybe it couldn’t,” but he would be one
Who wouldn’t say so till he’d tried.
So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin
On his face. If he worried he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.


Somebody scoffed: “Oh, you’ll never do that;
At least no one ever has done it;”
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat
And the first thing we knew he’d begun it.
With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
Without any doubting or quiddit,
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.


There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
There are thousands to prophesy failure,
There are thousands to point out to you, one by one,
The dangers that wait to assail you.
But just buckle in with a bit of a grin,
Just take off your coat and go to it;
Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing
That “cannot be done,” and you’ll do it.
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Old 09-25-2022, 09:13 AM   #3
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Name: Duane
Trailer: 1978 Burro
Michigan
Posts: 93
78 Burro

haha what a great poem!! You are right and I was laughed at many a time and by more than one person. I did love the light and small Burro and did not mind spending a lot of time working on it. I also replaced parts of the floor with 7/16" treated plywood. Took all of the windows out repaired them and put them back in after priming and painting the inside and outside. I also sealed all of the window openings with resin so if any water got behind a window it could not go between the inside and outside shells. Used butyl tape and stainless steel screws to put the windows back in. New roof vent with fan too.

I replaced (cut out) the hinge pockets on the door and body with three pieces of 7/16" treated plywood since the old ones were in very bad shape and weak too.

I also replaced the door lock with a basic RV one from Amazon. I filled that opening with 7/16" treated plywood too.

Before I prime and paint the door I will probably try and make it look ok with resin.

My grandmother was born in 1888 and died in 1966 when I was 16. She taught me how to sew, make rag rugs etc. Push mowed her lawn and chopped wood for her kitchen wood stove. Still miss her much.

Thanks very much for your response Gary!!
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Old 09-25-2022, 11:14 AM   #4
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Name: Gary
Trailer: UHaul CT13
Iowa
Posts: 302
You're welcome, Duane.
I have a long history of doing things in unconventional ways, and/or fixing up things other folks would have just thrown out.
[Not everyone approves.]
Keep on keepin' on...
Gary

Pic attached of my first car... you don't get a lot for $10, even back in '72.
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Old 09-27-2022, 02:09 PM   #5
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Name: Duane
Trailer: 1978 Burro
Michigan
Posts: 93
Old ride

hey Gary that is a real old ride!!!! What the heck year and model is that? Looks like you were and ain't afraid of working hard either!

My Dad said I had to buy my own car since I could not wreck the family car. He needed it to go to work. Bought a 60 Chevy 3 on the tree 6 banger for $185 in 1968.

I bought a 90 Olds 88 with 73k on it about 5 or more years ago. After I checked the compression and vacuum I knew there was a problem. I had not taken an engine apart for at least 3 decades but after checking #2 cylinder (60 psi) I knew it was a bad valve and wanted to get the engine back to life.

Runs good now after all of the work I put into it and I hauled my Burro to AZ last year with it.
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Old 09-28-2022, 05:06 AM   #6
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Name: Gary
Trailer: UHaul CT13
Iowa
Posts: 302
Duane,
The Olds 88 seems like it'd be a great tow vehicle for the Burro. When I got into autobody work, my first "official" job was an Olds of about that vintage... a little old lady had scraped one whole side of it up, and quit driving then. Once tidied up, it became the first car for a neighbor's daughter.
The pic of my first car was a '49 Prefect [English Ford] that a local guy had gotten as a parts car for the '48 Prefect he was restoring. After swapping the driver's door between them, he had a notion to build a hot rod, and had a '57 Chevy frame shortened about 2 ft... then gave up on it. I didn't know any better than to think I could turn it into a workable car---with a LOT of help from my gearhead buddies. $10, but no title.
$10 more, and we had a '54 Chevy 235 in it.
Later, a 250... then a 283... then a 327... and then a 409. [overkill finally achieved] Drove it for 6 yrs or so before moving onto more normal things, that weren't quite so "rough as a cob".............
Pic attached of when it first hit the road, by the old depot in town. [note rotted out bottom of driver's door]

Did a similar kind of crazy when we decided to get a hard-shell camper and quit tent camping. Got a real good deal on a U-Haul CT13 that had been lightly rear-ended by a semi... lots of opportunities to learn working with fiberglass on that one. [exhaustively long build thread on this site] Now, son & daughter-in-law camp with it, and I'm working on building a teardrop.........

Note: We could get rebuked for taking things off-topic, with all this old car talk... happened to me on another camper forum.
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Old 09-28-2022, 05:18 AM   #7
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Name: Gary
Trailer: UHaul CT13
Iowa
Posts: 302
Just checked my email inbox, and read daily Seth's Blog. Seems appropriate to "challenging" projects:

"When innovation arrives, the logistics people have to scramble to keep up, because innovation always makes it hard to do things the way we used to.
Over time, an innovative company thrives if it can get its logistics in order. Ship the right stuff to the right people on time and on budget.
Once this happens, it often means that the logistics people gain in power and influence. After all, they pulled off a miracle.
Then, when the next innovation shows up, the logistics voices in the room are likely to have more say in what happens next. That’s why upstarts who feel like they have nothing to lose are so much more likely to innovate–they don’t realize how hard it is going to be.
Innovation doesn’t work without logistics."
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