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Old 04-24-2020, 02:05 PM   #21
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I will have to try this. I'm going to have a solar setup that would make an electric toaster a no brainer ..
In that case, get the tee shirt also..

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Old 04-24-2020, 02:30 PM   #22
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I'ver used both stove top types, and, like Sid, prefer the Primus single slice type over the Coleman. That said, I far prefer a good old $10.00 pop up electric toaster running on my inverter.
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Old 04-24-2020, 03:51 PM   #23
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Frying pan works just fine. I'm sure you've all made a toasted cheese sandwiches. Make toast the same way without the cheese.
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Old 04-24-2020, 04:50 PM   #24
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Frying pan works just fine. I'm sure you've all made a toasted cheese sandwiches. Make toast the same way without the cheese.
Not for Elwood Blues....

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Old 04-25-2020, 05:38 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by Jon Vermilye View Post
I'ver used both stove top types, and, like Sid, prefer the Primus single slice type over the Coleman. That said, I far prefer a good old $10.00 pop up electric toaster running on my inverter.
In deference to the Current pandemic, I will allude to a Mexican beer commercial:
ďI donít often eat toast, but when I do (off grid), I prepare it with a pop-up electric toaster running on my inverter.Ē

In the absence of adequate battery power, however, I would use the griddle on the grill, which is how I prepare English muffins.

I installed my inverter first and foremost to be able to run my drip coffee maker any time, any place. The microwave and toaster are the only other appliances that the inverter is used to power, the microwave at rest stops to heat quick lunches, and the toaster by my spouse to prepare the Eggo waffles she sometimes eats for breakfast. I personally do not partake of Eggos.
My coffee maker is very versatile. It is made by Bonavita and is one of seven that is certified by the Specialty Coffee Association of Americaís (SCAA). It has a small footprint (good for in the trailer) and the filter basket sits atop the stainless steel thermal carafe, not suspended from rails over the carafe. As such, the carafe and filter basket can also serve as a pour-over coffee maker.
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Old 04-26-2020, 04:21 AM   #26
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For those who may not realize, a $10 toaster will typically use 1000 watts of power. To achieve this off grid could cost $500 to $1000 for batteries, solar, and an inverter., or the alternative, a generator.

Last summer while on the road I discovered a pour over coffee maker (I have the Oxo), into an insulated tumbler makes very good coffee. I sprung for the Yeti 20 oz. tumbler which keeps coffee hot for hours. I now use the same set up at home.
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Old 04-26-2020, 05:15 AM   #27
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For those who may not realize, a $10 toaster will typically use 1000 watts of power. To achieve this off grid could cost $500 to $1000 for batteries, solar, and an inverter., or the alternative, a generator.
That is true, Raz. My drip coffee maker uses 1,500 watts for 6 minutes. The toaster uses 800 watts for maybe 2 minutes, and the microwave uses (I believe) 700 watts for however long it needs to run.

My power comes from 2 Lifeline 6v AGM batteries, a 2,000 watt inverter, and a 160 watt roof mounted solar panel. While I am an infrequent user of inverter power, using any of these appliances off grid (while on the road) has never resulted in severe depletion of the battery as it quickly recharges via the solar and what little 12v is supplied by the tow vehicle. I think your comments are valid, but are really of much greater concern to those who may be boondocking long term rather than making lunch in a rest area or overnight in a Walmart or Crackerbarrel, etc., without shore power. If I were planning to boondock in a remote area, then I would take the Honda 2000 along and not use the inverter. I do have a 150 pure sine wave inverter that plugs into a 12v outlet. That gets more use as my wife likes to watch TV before bedtime and I do not have a 12v TV. The current draw of the TV, however, is minimal.
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Old 04-26-2020, 07:42 AM   #28
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Yes! Also realize: once you get the hang of it, a pour over cone makes significantly better coffee than 99% of drip machines. In my book, drip machines are popular because they're convenient, not because they make good coffee. Just look at Keurig...

I feel bad about it...but I've been renting a house all winter and have been using the oven for toast. I don't want to buy a toaster for the winter and have to store it in the summer.

When I'm car camping, I absolutely use the frying pan method.
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Old 04-26-2020, 07:48 AM   #29
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Careful shopping, looking at the wattage labels let me choose a 2 slice pop up toaster that draws 700 watts. My coffee maker draws 600 watts. Both worked fine on a 1000 watt inverter, a pair of 232 amp hour batteries & 200 watts of solar, all on my Escape 17B.

When I switched to an Escape 21, I went with 2 factory installed 160 watt panels, a portable 160 watt panel when needed, a 1500 watt inverter & recently added a pair of 100 amp hour lithium batteries. As to a generator, I carry a 700/900 watt propane only generator as a back up for charging the batteries only, and have only run it to exercise it. I still use the toaster & coffee pot, and my current microwave is adjustable from 200 watts to 950 watts.

Do I need any of this? Of course not. I tent camped for many years with an ice chest or less. But, since I now spend 6 - 8 months living in the trailer, much of which is dry camping, having the ability to use normal appliances is a plus. I have no gripe with those that believe in minimal camping, but that is not what I do.
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Old 04-26-2020, 09:33 AM   #30
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The stove top toasters work fine once you get the flame setting right. Patience and practice are a virtue. Plug in toasters are one of the most efficient appliances you can own. Almost all of the electrical energy is converted to heat. But finding a well made one can be challenging. Good point,: A lower wattage allows for the smaller inverter and will just take longer. I doubt you're in a hurry.

I've tried everything; cowboy coffee, drip, percolator, and french press. It all tastes fine to me. The pour over into the insulated tumbler is the best mostly because it starts hot and stays hot for a long time. I'm not fussy about coffee but I like it hot. You lose a lot of heat making the coffee in one container and pouring into another. And reheated coffee is the worst. The Yeti tumbler at $30 is expensive but works very well. One thing I discovered is that you have to buy from an authorized dealer. Lots of knock offs that don't work well.
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Old 04-26-2020, 10:48 AM   #31
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Looking at the photos in Post 7 (Raz), if you are old enough, the original stove top toasters were not open. The four sides were enclosed and had the appearance of a cheese grater, with holes to allow the flame’s heat to reach the bread. And the first electric toasters did not pop the bread out. From the end, they were triangular in shape and the sides were hinged at the bottom to allow insertion of the bread and its removal when toasting was complete. Anybody remember?
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Old 04-26-2020, 10:56 AM   #32
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Yes! Also realize: once you get the hang of it, a pour over cone makes significantly better coffee than 99% of drip machines. In my book, drip machines are popular because they're convenient, not because they make good coffee. Just look at Keurig...

I feel bad about it...but I've been renting a house all winter and have been using the oven for toast. I don't want to buy a toaster for the winter and have to store it in the summer.

When I'm car camping, I absolutely use the frying pan method.
I would agree about the convenience, but I would put the coffee quality made in my Moccamaster (used at home) and my Bonavita (used in my trailer) against any pour over, and have used the pour over method with the Bonavita as the filter basket sits atop the thermal carafe. I would also claim that the single most important factor in making good coffee is to use recently roasted beans, ground just prior to brewing. And, IMO, unless you only want caffein and donít care about quality taste, Keurig makes Krap, and the modules are an environmental nightmare.
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Old 04-26-2020, 11:38 AM   #33
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The pour over into the insulated tumbler is the best mostly because it starts hot and stays hot for a long time. I'm not fussy about coffee but I like it hot.
...
The Yeti tumbler at $30 is expensive but works very well. One thing I discovered is that you have to buy from an authorized dealer. Lots of knock offs that don't work well.
Same here on coffee.

I helped my daughter do a science project comparing insulated tumblers a couple of years ago (her idea, because Hydroflask water bottles were the latest fad among her friends). We tested Hydroflask, Yeti, and several knock-offs, all double wall, vacuum insulated stainless steel. We controlled for size and shape as much as possible. Our control was a single wall uninsulated beverage container. We tested both hot and cold.

Conclusion was no statistical difference among various brands as long as they were vacuum insulated. Huge difference compared to the uninsulated container.

YMMV
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Old 04-26-2020, 12:15 PM   #34
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I like ur wheel well table, Greg
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Old 04-26-2020, 12:46 PM   #35
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Looking at the photos in Post 7 (Raz), if you are old enough, the original stove top toasters were not open. The four sides were enclosed and had the appearance of a cheese grater, with holes to allow the flameís heat to reach the bread. And the first electric toasters did not pop the bread out. From the end, they were triangular in shape and the sides were hinged at the bottom to allow insertion of the bread and its removal when toasting was complete. Anybody remember?
Do you mean one of these?
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Old 04-26-2020, 03:03 PM   #36
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I would agree about the convenience, but I would put the coffee quality made in my Moccamaster (used at home) and my Bonavita (used in my trailer) against any pour over, and have used the pour over method with the Bonavita as the filter basket sits atop the thermal carafe. I would also claim that the single most important factor in making good coffee is to use recently roasted beans, ground just prior to brewing. And, IMO, unless you only want caffein and donít care about quality taste, Keurig makes Krap, and the modules are an environmental nightmare.
Yep, exactly my point. If you get a really high quality drip machine that heats the water correctly, they'll make good coffee. They're the 1%. And Keurig is epitome of convenience over all else. Taste, waste, the ritual of coffee making. Convenience over all. One of the worst inventions of the last few decades in my book.

My favorite breakfast cafe serves excellent coffee, and it comes from a drip machine. But often when I go to friends houses and have their drip coffee...I need to add cream.

I bought a Hario hand grinder for my coffee, probably 6 years ago now. Still going strong, and I always have fresh ground coffee at camp.
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Old 04-29-2020, 10:10 AM   #37
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Camp Oven

Anyone suggest one of these... toast and lots more...
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Old 04-29-2020, 10:11 AM   #38
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We've used the four sided camp stove top toaster for years - not only is it good for making toast but it also works well for heating hard taco shells for Taco Night.


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Old 04-29-2020, 10:26 AM   #39
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I have never had any luck with those wire thingies. We have an antique camp toaster that I am going to try next.

Could not post a pic, sorry. But it is a very basic 4-sided pyramid with closed and vented sides. Hope that makes sense.
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Old 04-29-2020, 10:26 AM   #40
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Anyone suggest one of these... toast and lots more...

I have that Coleman oven. I'm not sure if it's still in the trailer or what I did with it. It weighs seven pounds. I used it once for reheating pulled pork. It got too hot for reheating when I used a butane stove as a heat source. Ended up using the BBQ for a heat source ( which when you think about it, made the oven pointless ).
My buddy also has one and he made cinnamon buns, once.
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