Our First Trip Out West! - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV
RV News RVBusiness 2021 Top 10 RVs of the Year, plus 56 additional debuts and must-see units → ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-28-2018, 06:00 PM   #21
Member
 
Name: Maryellen
Trailer: 2015 Casita SD
Pennsylvania
Posts: 53
Al, I've taken copious notes on all the places you mentioned. I'm a real organizer/planner so I have a notebook page for each spot that we want to visit and am recording all the specific information I can gather for each spot. Thanks a lot.
Maryellen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 06:04 PM   #22
Member
 
Name: Maryellen
Trailer: 2015 Casita SD
Pennsylvania
Posts: 53
Carolyn, just ordered the National Geographic Atlas Adventure Edition! Only recently heard about National Forest Campgrounds, so this will be great to have.
Maryellen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 08:20 PM   #23
Member
 
Name: Mo
Trailer: Still looking
Texas
Posts: 53
If you visit Mesa Verde area, plan to take a short detour to Dolores, CO to visit the Anasazi Heritage Center, a wonderful museum operated by the Bureau of Land Management.

Yeah, Mexican Hat! Not sure what your route entails, but I'd avoid the Moki Dugway switchbacks on Hwy 281 if you are pulling a trailer. Google "pictures of Moki Dugway switchbacks" for clarification.

I noticed there is now a Goosenecks State Park near Mexican Hat that overlooks the meanders of the San Juan River.

Also love Navajo National Monument, which has two of the most amazingly beautiful Anasazi cliff dwellings (Keet Seel and Betatakin) anywhere.

Several lifetimes are not enough to experience all the magic that Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Arizona can offer. There's some awesome in Nevada as well, but I've hardly been there, so can't make recommendations.

Pay attention to the weather every single day. Depending on time of year and elevation, it can be either hotter or colder than you expect it to be.

There can also be a summer monsoon pattern with afternoon thunderstorms every day in the mountains in July and sometimes into August.
June Bug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 09:22 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 3,356
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maryellen View Post
Good advice, Bill. We'll stay to the south in early May and then not hit Yellowstone til June. It's clear that we have to plan another trip. Some careful map study and mileage checking has caused us to move the Grand Canyon, Brice and Zion to "next trip" status simply because of time. (sigh) There is more to the west and north of them that looks good too.
Check out the weather across Grand Canyon, Zion, and Bryce. North Rim and Bryce are the coldest, Zion the warmest. you could easily spend a month between those areas along, particularly if you add Capitol Reef and Arches.

Tremendous hiking at Zion, huge crowds too. All of them have plenty of hiking actually. UT also has very nice state parks! Our last trip we went to Antelope Canyon and Horseshoe Bend, we have driven right by both of those spots without stoping for decades (both in Northern AZ, near Grand Canyon).

Sites out west are really spread out. Best to do several trips, and visit a cluster, and maybe stuff on the way out or back. So I would put the SW in one trip, include UT. Then CO up to Yellowstone in another.

Its kind of amazing we don't live in the west, as we love it!
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2018, 09:24 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,892
Yes, tons to see in the west!

If you like history and old ruins, you'll like Mesa Verde. But you should plan to spend at least 1 full day so you can climb down some ladders and walk some trails to see the best stuff. Personally I don't get too excited about old ruins, but many folks love 'em.

In that vicinity, you should consider driving from Durango north on the Million Dollar Highway to Silverton, Ouray (you can soak in the hot springs north of town) and Ridgway (the latter has a nice SP) and then loop west & south to Telluride. That time of year the snow on the mountain peaks will be beautiful. You will be amazed by the huge waterfall visible from the of Telluride, and the zigzag road that cuts down the mountainside along that fall. You can drive up close to the bottom of the fall (no further though). From there you could either continue south and loop back to Mesa Verde area, or drive NW toward Arches NP, or whatever.

Speaking of Arches, that is the most beautiful NP I think I've seen. It will already be hot there in May, but you can enjoy the park in mornings and again after supper, with an afternoon spent in A/C if necessary. Absolutely stunning sandstone formations, and you're right up close to them. Here and there you park and walk anywhere from 5 minutes to an hour to reach some features. Take cameras!!

Click image for larger version

Name:	UT0104_L-sm.jpg
Views:	21
Size:	132.4 KB
ID:	117177

Click image for larger version

Name:	SDUT0068_L-sm.jpg
Views:	10
Size:	250.1 KB
ID:	117178

Another nice place nearby worth a drive-through is Colorado National Monument. More sandstone formations and views from high up, good for a half-day even if you don't want to hike any trails.
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2018, 08:49 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Name: bob
Trailer: Was A-Liner now 13f Scamp
Missouri
Posts: 3,189
mesa verde

I don't know your health conditions but mesa verde is absolutely hard to believe the hike down is not strenuous at all but spend a few hours there then start climbing back up is tough! you have no idea while going down how steep that climb back up is going to be take plenty of water also.

at 60 is was hard now at 76 no way!

oh Mexican Hat is pretty neat also

bob
k0wtz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2018, 09:28 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Name: Bob
Trailer: Parkliner 2014
Georgia
Posts: 158
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maryellen View Post
Good advice, Bill. We'll stay to the south in early May and then not hit Yellowstone til June. It's clear that we have to plan another trip. Some careful map study and mileage checking has caused us to move the Grand Canyon, Brice and Zion to "next trip" status simply because of time. (sigh) There is more to the west and north of them that looks good too.
Absolutely more than one trip needed. But just make sure you don't think that by doing YNP in June, you can avoid cold weather prep. I believe that over the years, every day on the calendar has recorded snowfall there sometime. I've only visited 6-8 times, all in July or August, and have had a full week of every night in the 20's; another trip, temps pushed 100. All easy to deal with, if you've packed that one extra item.
Have fun.
FishingBob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2018, 11:37 AM   #28
Member
 
Name: Maryellen
Trailer: 2015 Casita SD
Pennsylvania
Posts: 53
Thanks Mike and Bob and Bob. More circles on the map and red flags. Hot springs sound lovely to experience. We are recently retired Bob, and with enough spring in our hiking boots to tackle Mesa Verde albeit carefully! I'm loading up that note book with route numbers, road names, and camping suggestions. Keep 'em coming. You all are terrific!
Maryellen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2018, 02:20 PM   #29
Senior Member
 
Name: bob
Trailer: Was A-Liner now 13f Scamp
Missouri
Posts: 3,189
Don't forget Monument Valley if you are an old western fan you will see all those great old rock formations. Beautiful drive too!!


bob
k0wtz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2018, 02:53 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
rbryan's Avatar
 
Name: Robert
Trailer: 2015 Escape 19 "Past Tents" 2018 F150 Lariat 2.7L EB SuperCrew
Arkansas
Posts: 1,298
Registry
There is alot of good advice here Maryellen on what to see. The Big 5 in Utah, Grand Canyon and Monument Valley are definite don't miss it's.

As for South Texas, we're not particularly scenic, but we do have alot of history and local charm. If you're ever in the San Antonio area, send me a PM and I'll be happy to give you some recommendations. There are too many to list here.
__________________
"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy an RV. And that is pretty close."
rbryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2018, 04:40 PM   #31
Senior Member
 
Jon Vermilye's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21
Oswego, NY
Posts: 2,116
Registry
Speaking of south Texas, if you cross Texas on I 10, a "must see" stop, at least for those that can deal with caves, is the Caverns of Señora. They have a "rustic" campground with water & electric and offer a tour of the prettiest cave I've ever visited. Some photos.
Jon Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-29-2018, 05:24 PM   #32
Senior Member
 
Byron Kinnaman's Avatar
 
Name: Byron
Trailer: 2006 Scamp 13' towed with a 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7l Magnum W/full tow package (over kill)
Oregon
Posts: 7,053
Registry
I hope you have a great trip. Pack warm clothes, Yellowstone could still have snow at up into June even sometimes Jully.
__________________
Byron & Anne enjoying the everyday Saturday thing.
Byron Kinnaman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2018, 11:50 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Civilguy's Avatar
 
Name: Mike
Trailer: Escape 21 & Jeep GC 5.7 (Previous 2012 Casita FD17 & 2010 Audi Q5)
Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 1,601
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by thrifty bill View Post
We went out west last May. It was 25F in Yellowstone (early May) and 105F in St George, UT (outside Zion in late May). We go out west a couple of times a year, and Zion once a year.

Personally I’d break it into a couple of trips, one to the SW and one to the NW. for example, this year we are heading to CO in late May. Then we are going to Alaska in July. By breaking it up you can head to which ever area has more suitable weather. When it’s comfortable in Yellowstone it’s too hot in much of the SW for example.
Maryellen,

I think Bill nailed it; it's good to be prepared for everything from 25 to 105 degrees.

I mean this seriously. The weather in the desert and at higher altitudes can be highly variable. When I backpacked, I considered that I had packed perfectly if I could be warm wearing every stitch I'd brought while staying in my down sleeping bag. With our trailers, you can bring a little more clothing than that.

Rain or even hail or light snow can emerge and then yield in turn to sunshine at dizzying speed. Silk, wool and synthetics are good for wet weather. Cotton is good for hot, dry weather. Large brim hats and even thin, long sleeves can be helpful when you are exposed to a great deal of sun.

Having clothing in layers gives you flexibility and allows you to adapt to the rapid changes which can occur through the course of a day. As an example, I'd rather wear a breathable rain-gear shell over a fleece jacket over a sweater over a short-sleeve shirt over long-sleeve underwear than to have a thick, bulky down jacket which can quickly become too hot.

It sounds like you'll have a great adventure.
__________________
~ “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.” ~
Civilguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2018, 12:05 PM   #34
Member
 
Name: Maryellen
Trailer: 2015 Casita SD
Pennsylvania
Posts: 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Vermilye View Post
Speaking of south Texas, if you cross Texas on I 10, a "must see" stop, at least for those that can deal with caves, is the Caverns of Señora. They have a "rustic" campground with water & electric and offer a tour of the prettiest cave I've ever visited. Some photos.
Please give me the name of a town that is nearby, Jon, so I can locate the caverns on the map.
Thanks a bunch.
Maryellen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2018, 12:11 PM   #35
Member
 
Name: Maryellen
Trailer: 2015 Casita SD
Pennsylvania
Posts: 53
Ok Mike and Byron - layers for cold that can be taken off for heat. Check. Digging out long underwear and then lightweight "sun shield" tops and pants from my favorite Columbia Outerwear outlet. Wide brimmed hats. Rain coat, fleece, hiking boots...check.
Maryellen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2018, 03:01 PM   #36
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
Posts: 5,892
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maryellen View Post
Please give me the name of a town that is nearby, Jon, so I can locate the caverns on the map.
Thanks a bunch.
I think he meant 'Caverns of Sonora', which is close to the town of Sonora TX along I-10.
Mike Magee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2018, 03:12 PM   #37
Senior Member
 
Jon Vermilye's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2017 Escape 21
Oswego, NY
Posts: 2,116
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Magee View Post
I think he meant 'Caverns of Sonora', which is close to the town of Sonora TX along I-10.
Yea, spell check got me again! The link has a map. This is a "live" cave, i.e. warm, and wet. Many beautiful formations.
Jon Vermilye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2018, 08:52 AM   #38
Senior Member
 
rbryan's Avatar
 
Name: Robert
Trailer: 2015 Escape 19 "Past Tents" 2018 F150 Lariat 2.7L EB SuperCrew
Arkansas
Posts: 1,298
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Vermilye View Post
Yea, spell check got me again! The link has a map. This is a "live" cave, i.e. warm, and wet. Many beautiful formations.
It certainly highlights what the hard water in the Hill Country can do, given enough time. An acquaintance of mine who teaches geology tells me that there are probably hundreds of such caverns in the region, that remain undiscovered.
__________________
"You can't buy happiness, but you can buy an RV. And that is pretty close."
rbryan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 11:56 AM   #39
Member
 
Name: Richard
Trailer: Escape 21
Texas
Posts: 54
Carlsbad Caverns

Carlsbad Caverns in south-east New Mexico is worth a stop.
richardr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2018, 12:33 PM   #40
Senior Member
 
Gilda's Avatar
 
Name: Gilda
Trailer: 2011 Scamp 13'
California
Posts: 1,365
Registry
Maryellen,
You've planned to go to some very beautiful spots "Out West" on your future trips and it involves long stretches of driving.

As a native San Franciscan, I suggest that you go as far "Out West" as you can go, on yet another trip! Visiting California, Oregon and Washington makes for an incredibly scenic visit. To do this you might want to consider flying to the "Left Coast" and renting an RV.

For our "dream RV trip" to Alaska we're glad we chose this option as it cut off a lot of wear and tear on our TV, trailer and ourselves. I will never knock "Cruise America" RV rentals again as they gave great service and a good rig to rent. While we love our 13' Scamp best, we loved the convenience and ease of our Alaska trip. Packing (carry-on only) was surprisingly simple: clothing, sleeping bags & money. A quick trip to Walmart provided pillows and other provisions we needed.

Have a GREAT trip!
__________________
The Gleeful Glamper
Gilda (Jill-da)
"Here we go again on another amazing adventure"
Gilda is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Our First "Real" Camping Trip with our Casita! DeanCHS1980 Camping, Campout Reports 23 04-25-2016 05:13 AM
Our first trip out... hotfishtacos General Chat 7 12-18-2012 06:25 PM
Our first time out in our 2001 16' Casita - Whistler, BC, Canada lars Camping, Campout Reports 4 09-03-2011 01:55 AM
A 5000 mile trip out West brian m. Camping, Campout Reports 7 08-12-2008 10:31 AM
Our Trip "OUT WEST" Chris Z Camping, Campout Reports 5 07-02-2006 09:54 AM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 12:37 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.