camping axe recommendations - Fiberglass RV


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Old 05-29-2020, 05:29 AM   #1
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camping axe recommendations

Hi all,


Any recommendations on a single multi-purpose axe for chopping and splitting firewood to keep onboard?


Thank you!
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Old 05-29-2020, 06:07 AM   #2
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Hi all,


Any recommendations on a single multi-purpose axe for chopping and splitting firewood to keep onboard?


Thank you!
Stihl products are usually expensive but if you take care of them they will last a lifetime.

https://www.stihlusa.com/products/ha...foresthatchet/
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Old 05-29-2020, 07:41 AM   #3
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We carry a Plumb axe with a fiberglass handle and a collapsible buck saw
I gave up trying to chop kindling with an axe . I cut strips of kindling from scrap lumber on my table saw and store the kindling in a plastic tub in the back of my truck . It’s a lot easier to start a fire with dry kindling
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Old 05-29-2020, 09:16 AM   #4
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If you want something beautiful, very functional, and a keepsake (expensive), go with these guys...https://www.gransforsbruk.com/en/

You can get them online.

Otherwise, your local hardware store should have hatchets that can maintain an edge and more importantly fit inside the tight storage of a camper trailer. Plastic or wood handle should be fine, though I prefer the weight of the wooden handles. Most wooden handle axes will last a lifetime too if you don't leave it at camp when you pack up.
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Old 05-29-2020, 10:01 AM   #5
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FISKARS sells - or used to sell - a 28" axe with splitting cheeks. You can use it with a sledge; something you can't do with a conventional axe with an "eye". I've had one of these for about 10 years and it's very handy, weighs less than 5 lbs. Comes with a moulded plastic blade-guard that also serves as a carry-handle.
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Old 05-29-2020, 11:08 AM   #6
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If you are boon docking, in areas that allow scrounging for firewood.

But, most campgrounds don't allow it. Nor, bringing in wood from outside.
You have to pay for their wood.
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Old 05-29-2020, 11:55 AM   #7
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As you can see it sort of depends on your style of camping. I have a small, high-quality hatchet. Works great for further splitting already split firewood, and for kindling, but that's about it.

It's best to do most of the work at home. If you're buying pre-split wood, it's usually pretty easy to further split with a hatchet. I have a friend who brings a maul camping with him, but I'm not sure he has enough firewood experience yet to really get the difference between a maul and an ax.

With the dry pine and fir we have around here, a basic ax or hatchet work fine. But if I'm up in the forest scavenging, then a folding saw is often more essential than a hatchet. If I were fully outfitted for tent camping in the forest...then I'd have a chainsaw, bow saw and ax.

But yes, transporting wood is becoming more and more of an issue due to insect and fungus infestations.
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:07 PM   #8
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Whatever axe you get, this little sharpener is great to stick somewhere in the camper/TV.

https://shop.coronatoolsusa.com/ac-8...ning-tool.html
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:08 PM   #9
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I gave up trying to chop kindling with an axe . I cut strips of kindling from scrap lumber on my table saw and store the kindling in a plastic tub in the back of my truck . It’s a lot easier to start a fire with dry kindling
Yeah, but storing the table saw is a hassle, and offensive to other campers

I decided to bring a Duraflame log along for starting fires. I know, it's not traditional, but it works. Just cut a thin piece of the waxy log off and it will start a fire very well. Even with wet wood. One log will start many fires.
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:19 PM   #10
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I decided to bring a Duraflame log along for starting fires. I know, it's not traditional, but it works. Just cut a thin piece of the waxy log off and it will start a fire very well. Even with wet wood. One log will start many fires.
You mean the traditional method of splashing Coleman Fuel onto the wood and lighting it?
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:42 PM   #11
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You mean the traditional method of splashing Coleman Fuel onto the wood and lighting it?
Back in the old days, when men were men, and eyebrows were burned off.
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Old 05-29-2020, 01:59 PM   #12
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I don't carry an ax. No need since I generally don't have a c"camp fire". Don't need the smoke or the light pollution.
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Old 05-29-2020, 03:09 PM   #13
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Axes Mauls hatchets and Wedges

You’ll get a lot Of advice and and numerous opinions when it comes to the procurement preparation and execution of campfires successfully. If you don’t have an axe or hatchet at all and you want one, I would advise an Estwing campers axe. Why? Because they are one piece of steel, and if you miss while chopping you will not damage the area where the head and handle meet. However depending upon what size of wood you’re working with , I prefer a folding, or rigid bow saw to cut wrist sized dead wood and smaller. If you are splitting a log say 12 or 15 inches in diameter I prefer a splitting maul or an engineers hammer about 3 lbs and a couple steel wedges. Learn to read the medullary rays and grain on dry wood for splitting easily. Whatever you get, a round axe stone and an 8 or ten inch mill bastard cut file are great for maintaining the edge. When you are working with wood, always wear gloves and eye protection. I like the military surplus ballistic goggles. They cost about $20 at army surplus stores or gun shows. I also wear them mowing, grinding, weed whacking, chainsawing, any time flying particles are possible. Now this might sound crazy but I do not know your level of experience but old Boy Scout manuals from the mid sixties did a fine job of teaching the use of cutting tools and fire building just for your reference. Hope this helps and was not too rudimentary.
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Old 05-29-2020, 05:08 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by Pete Hein View Post
FISKARS sells - or used to sell - a 28" axe with splitting cheeks. You can use it with a sledge; something you can't do with a conventional axe with an "eye". I've had one of these for about 10 years and it's very handy, weighs less than 5 lbs. Comes with a moulded plastic blade-guard that also serves as a carry-handle.


I have used these Fiskars splitters several times and they work great. They’re a great option if you’re going to be in a campground that sells pre-cut wood. These axes are perfect for splitting larger pieces down for kindling. If you’re in a situation where you’re gathering your own wood, you’re most likely going to need something like a Sven saw rather than an axe for cutting it into pieces.

https://www.rei.com/product/404013/sven-folding-saw-21
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Old 05-29-2020, 07:02 PM   #15
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engineers hammer
I agree with the Estwing one-piece axe recommendation.

While there's certainly more elegant tools, like that heritage Gränsfors Bruk hand-forged head with a hickory handle, it's tough to beat the steel one-piece styles for resisting damage. As a bonus, the heads also stay firmly fixed without having to recite incantations under a full moon.

The "engineer's hammer" reference made me smile. As a machinist-friend used to advise me with a knowing grin, "Don't force it - get a bigger hammer!"
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Old 05-29-2020, 07:55 PM   #16
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I agree with the Estwing one-piece axe recommendation.

While there's certainly more elegant tools, like that heritage Gränsfors Bruk hand-forged head with a hickory handle, it's tough to beat the steel one-piece styles for resisting damage. As a bonus, the heads also stay firmly fixed without having to recite incantations under a full moon.

The "engineer's hammer" reference made me smile. As a machinist-friend used to advise me with a knowing grin, "Don't force it - get a bigger hammer!"
Absolutely agree. And a very funny post!

Thanks Mike.

BTW, I like the new avatar.
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Old 05-29-2020, 08:10 PM   #17
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I like Estwing for chopping, but it doesn't split very well. These days I carry the Fiskars splitting axe.
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Old 05-29-2020, 08:31 PM   #18
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I have a Fiskar's axe and a small maul. When one gets stuck, I hit it with the other. Works every time.
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Old 05-30-2020, 11:39 AM   #19
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BTW, I like the new avatar.
Thanks! As a public service, it's now brilliant yellow like a highway hazard sign so people can more easily steer around my posts!
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Old 05-30-2020, 02:58 PM   #20
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I think camp axes are responsible for more injuries than any other single piece of camping equipment. I usually carry a machete but they are potentially even worse in the hands of someone who hasn't been using one since he was 10 years old like I have. My dad grew up in the Panama Canal Zone so a machete is almost a daily use tool down there.



Another recent addition of "tools to hurt yourself with while camping" is my Silky Katanaboy folding saw. This thing is SHARP and will cut through a tree using easy pull strokes. The Duraflame log is probably the best suggestion above.
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