Cost for slab, carport, and shelter? - Fiberglass RV


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Old 08-26-2019, 10:33 PM   #1
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Cost for slab and carport for a Casita?

How much would a cement slab and metal carport for a SD17 Casita w/AC cost?
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Old 08-26-2019, 10:39 PM   #2
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The idea would be to have a couple of these places and stay at whichever one was closest to some business clients.

Have you considered a nuclear option?
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Old 08-27-2019, 02:29 AM   #3
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Metal car ports would be in the $1500-$1800 range installed, I just checked on a 14x23x10, around $2100 installed. The concrete will be priced by the square foot, 3 1/2" depth, the size of a 2 x 4, dirt work if not level will be more. I would guess only at the price of concrete, $3000 to $4500 for a carport pad for a Casita size area. Concrete work is all different prices, sometime depends on how bad the person needs the work. You just have to do your homework on this, get referrals if you can, and make sure they forum it level with no sloping only enough for water run off. My son just enlarged his patio on a new home, he found a guy doing the concrete work on the new homes and he did the work for them on his off time from his regular job with the home construction company. It's pretty easy to check there work as there will be many homes to see his work.

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Old 08-27-2019, 11:41 AM   #4
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Concrete pricing varies by location. A smaller carport, say 12 foot by 20 foot, might cost about $1500. Around here, the concrete would cost about FOUR TIMES as much!

I had a garage built a couple of years ago, the concrete cost as much as the garage. And this was an insulated garage, with three doors (two with openers) and two windows.

After the financial melt down, all but two concrete companies in my county went out of business. I could only get one to even bid. Needless to say, I used GRAVEL on my last carport.


New Jersey I bet your concrete would cost even more, and you will need deeper footings most likely too, and permits, and a host of other costs. Various carport companies go out and erect a steel carport in about six hours or less. Price of the carport should not be much different. Carolina Carport is the company I used and they have plants and erection crews all over the US.

FWIW, I used "road bond" gravel. It packs well and tight. I have other areas where I used "regular gravel. Ten years later, the regular stuff still has not packed down.

Free standing metal carports themselves do not require a concrete floor. Now your town might. Area needs to be level first of course. Much prefer a vertical roof style, much less likely to leak and the snow will tend to slide off.

I got a 18 by 25 carport for my Escape 19, which is 19-6 long. The length is about perfect. I got 10 foot side wall height, 9 feet would have worked. Realize its much taller in the center. But I wanted a carport tall enough that if I ever got the Escape fifth wheel, it would be OK. My prior carport that I used for my Casita was too low (ouch). Cost to raise it up was about the same as a new carport. So now the Casita carport houses my Trillium.

My width is necessary due to the sharp angle I have to make to get into the carport. If I had a straight shot, a 12 foot wide carport would have worked. The Casita carport I have is 12 by 20.

First step is to your local building department to find out local requirements and permits. Even here in NC, the building department was a PITA, and they made the pouring of concrete very painful (made up additional requirements not in the code, because they "Could".
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:30 PM   #5
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How much would a cement slab and metal carport for a SD17 Casita w/AC cost?
Costs always depend on where you live and who does it. Concrete is expensive and varies greatly. Also does your area allow this type of building? Can you store your trailer at your residence? Make sure you have all the answers before you start your project.
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Old 08-27-2019, 04:56 PM   #6
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Gravel is ok in our area but the anchor requirements to hold the structure to the ground are pretty specific.

+1 on the erection companies that come in and build their structure for you in a day. I found one online that allowed walking through picking sizes and options and calculating price as it went.

With gravel you will not regret a good solid weed barrier under it. Don't want to talk about how I know this.

If the cost of concrete plus building was prohibitive in a single purchase it might be worth doing the concrete pad one year, with one of those inexpensive tarp carport on it. Or even a simple 4x4 post structure to support a ridge rafter to cover with a tarp until money is available for the structure purchase.

You can't easily put concrete under a built carport, you can put a carport on a slab you poured a year or two ago. Pad itself to park and store on will be an improvement. Tarp coverage over slab would be an improvement. Final carport with slab would be best improvement. From the standpoint of your use and value added to property. You have a camper, might one day sell. Concrete slab installation has value.

I would also lean toward the carports with sides structurally they are stronger. One can add a front or back later if desired but I will say the ones I looked at a back and front roll up door didn't add all that much. Which reminds me. Consider adding "extra" slab behind the structure area. Easy place to add storage later. Lean too holds our outside chairs under covers in something like that. Sister has her gas grill and other outdoor stuff stored in something like that off of their garage.

Size may be limited by code. Most areas have a limit on percentage of property that can be covered by structures, may also have limit on number of detached buildings. Plus will certainly have set back from property line requirements for side and back of property line. I did once build a 12 x 14 shed without a floor because township didn't require a permit for additions under $500 and over that they raised your taxes. I used scrap metal....from a metal warehouse construction. All I bought were hinges, 4x4 and some 2x4's annoying township inspectors is an added bonus. Lord knows they seem to enjoy annoying homeowners.


A local requirement that nothing can be built that extends in front of the house and attached garage also catches some folks who want to add something along the side of the house or garage where many park recreational items like campers or boats.
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Old 08-27-2019, 06:07 PM   #7
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take bids...get references. Do a calculation on how much concrete is needed. Contact the concrete company for a price delivered for that quantity. You do want a baseline so you can sort out labor cost versus materials cost. Get a big on the materials for the carport as well.


To save money on construction projects, even when I am not doing the labor, I act as my own general contractor and I arrange the purchase and delivery of the materials. Then I hire an experienced laborer.

Lumber yards will give you discounts on orders materials for such projects when you pay cash but you have to ask the manager for that discount. Cash is not literal, you can use a credit card. It just means you pay up front rather than having an account with the lumber yard where they send out a bill at the end of the month to their business accounts.


The lumber yards will also have persons who look at your construction drawings and then create a list of materials and create a purchase order for you that includes everything, the lumber, the hardware and even the roofing.
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Old 08-27-2019, 07:45 PM   #8
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take bids...get references. Do a calculation on how much concrete is needed. Contact the concrete company for a price delivered for that quantity. You do want a baseline so you can sort out labor cost versus materials cost. Get a big on the materials for the carport as well.
It's not a good idea to order the concrete separately from the finishers. And the cost of the concrete itself is not very meaningful. Much better to get a bid for the slab from a quality team that works together and knows their stuff. Then they will be responsible for all the details instead of anything going wrong falling on you to fix. They know and work with each other well, have all the equipment, they all show up at the right time, and they know the concrete supplier and the truck drivers. ALL very important for a quality job. Concrete is hard work and must be done well in order to come out right. The prep for that work is just as important as the finishing. And the concrete itself must be the right mix with either no chemicals, or just the right ones.

By trying to cut a few bucks off of every aspect of a job, you lose quality, and you spend a lot of time nickel-and-diming all parts of it at someone else's expense.

I recently had a 39' X 27' X 7 1/2" thick slab with heavy footings all around, poured and there were some details that we had to work out on the fly. The contractor and I had an excellent rapport and worked it out to both of our benefits. I paid what he asked and added a $200. tip at the end just as a simple thank you. The entire project got done in three, 1/2 day visits. So 1 1/2 day total time and it is the best concrete work I've seen in a long time. I asked them why they got the concrete where they did and he told me it was the best mix, with the least chance of cracking, and the longest working time. I showed him some of my other concrete and he just said, "Yep, that's why we don't get ours there".

Bottom line: If you try to save on everything, you loose something and the quality suffers. Professional workers deserve professional grade pay. Quality work might cost more, but it is likely done much more efficiently and will be satisfying for many years.

I had eight guys here. They did everything from start to finish with all of the rebar, forms excavating, compacting, etc. They placed 30 yards of concrete and I paid them $7,900. including my $200. tip. I supplied the #4 rebar and they set it on 12" centers in both directions. The slab is beautiful and doesn't puddle.

Now, the carport can begin! A 24 X 25 X 12 prefab, rated for 90 MPH wind and 20lb live load of snow. 3 in 12 pitch with galvanized trusses and 26 gauge steel.
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Old 08-28-2019, 05:08 AM   #9
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Side walls are a big plus, at least part way down. That will protect your camper from stuff blowing in on the sides.

On my carport, I paid extra for half walls. The crew showed up, since I have a ten foot eave height and the panels are 3 feet wide, they asked if I could accept 6 foot side walls instead of 5, no extra charge of course, and they saved the cutting. I took them up on the deal. I then found a pile of slightly damaged translucent panels at Lowes, regular price $12 a sheet, close out for $1 each. I used these panels to finish the sides (Actually, I have a one foot gap on the bottom, but weather is not going to reach the sides of my trailer now).

On gravel, a layer of landscape cloth underneath it will definitely help, otherwise you will be using Round Up routinely to control weeds (ask me how I know....).
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Old 09-04-2019, 04:59 PM   #10
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Here's mine

Click image for larger version

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10x20 slab with 20' carport on 9' legs


Cost $3500.00
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Old 09-05-2019, 06:29 AM   #11
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It's not a good idea to order the concrete separately from the finishers.

Might not be a good idea for you but it has always worked out OK for me
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Old 09-05-2019, 08:43 AM   #12
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Attachment 131400

10x20 slab with 20' carport on 9' legs


Cost $3500.00
Great deal. I paid $7000 for a 20 x 22.5 foot slab with footers.....
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Old 09-07-2019, 01:05 AM   #13
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Attachment 131400

10x20 slab with 20' carport on 9' legs


Cost $3500.00
That looks great, complete with pupper! Is the right wheel flat? Looks like it is leaning to the right a bit.
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Old 01-19-2020, 07:22 PM   #14
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There is a YouTube page “rusty78609” that covered this topic. Check out his YouTube page.
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Old 01-22-2020, 01:27 PM   #15
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Getting bids on concrete work is meaningless unless all the contractors are bidding on the same specifications

1) Are they pouring the concrete on grade using the present fill or are they digging out the area and putting in sand fill for drainage ?
2) Are they compacting the area or just dumping concrete on loose soil or sand fill ?
3 ) How thick is the concrete slab 3” or 3 1/2” or 4”” or 5” ?
4) What is the PSI rating of the concrete 3000 or 3500 or 4000 or 4500 PSI ?
5) Is the concrete air entrained ?
6) What is the slump of the concrete ?
7) What size aggregate are they using in the concrete ?
8) Is the concrete fiber reinforced ?
9) Are they putting down a 6 mil vapor barrier under the slab or just placing the concrete directly on the ground
10) Are they installing 6x6” wire mesh or rebar in the concrete ?
11) What type of finish are the applying to the concrete - bull float - broom finish - hand troweled - power troweled ?
12) Are they putting expansion joints in the concrete
13) Do they plan on covering the slab after the pour with poly to delay the hydrating of the cement ?
14 ) Does the price include the slab apron ?
15) Does the concrete contain chloride ?


I recently had a 30’ x 40’ slab poured with a 3’ x 30’ apron in my pole barn
Excavated and sand fill added up to grade and tamped
4 1/2” thick concrete
4500 PSI fiber reinforced concrete 3/4” aggregate
6 mil vapor barrier
6x6 mesh in main slap
1/2” rebar in apron
Full expansion joints in slab and apron
Slab - Power troweled to smooth finish
Apron - Broom Finish for traction

Total Cost for material , labor , permit , tax = $5400
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Old 01-22-2020, 02:14 PM   #16
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Steve, you'll just love how I did a area of concrete floor in my pole barn. First I went down to the brook that runs through my property and shoveled up some nice washed gravel. Got some 80 lb bags of cement at Lowes. Leveled out and formed an area that I could do in about 4 hours with 1 X 6 boards. Put down some plastic and mixed up batches of concrete in my 70 year old electric mixer. Hand troweled it somewhat smooth, and done. Did several sections like that at minimal cost. Good enough for an old barn and it will last the rest of my lifetime. To store our Casita that won't fit in that barn because of height I put up a 10 X 16 pole shed, on #2 stone with a layer of pea stone to smooth it out, end wall only, metal roof, with a total cost of $1700 doing it all myself with a little help from my wife. It's been nice not having to sweep snow off the camper. Was going to buy one of those metal carports but it was too late in the year to get one.
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Old 01-22-2020, 04:07 PM   #17
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Steve, your concrete slab knowledge is way over my head.
This is what I do know about my project:

1. I am happy

2. The City Inspector was happy

3. My Casita is happy

And best of all:

4. My wife is happy

I'll leave all the technical stuff To you smart guys.😊 Thanks for sharing.
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Old 02-06-2020, 09:23 AM   #18
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what sort

bill what is the gravel you use. Is it the brown stuff I made the mistake of put white in my carport it still hasn't settled. I am taking it out and putting the brown that will pack down you can pack it down good with a mower.

bob

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Originally Posted by thrifty bill View Post
Concrete pricing varies by location. A smaller carport, say 12 foot by 20 foot, might cost about $1500. Around here, the concrete would cost about FOUR TIMES as much!

I had a garage built a couple of years ago, the concrete cost as much as the garage. And this was an insulated garage, with three doors (two with openers) and two windows.

After the financial melt down, all but two concrete companies in my county went out of business. I could only get one to even bid. Needless to say, I used GRAVEL on my last carport.


New Jersey I bet your concrete would cost even more, and you will need deeper footings most likely too, and permits, and a host of other costs. Various carport companies go out and erect a steel carport in about six hours or less. Price of the carport should not be much different. Carolina Carport is the company I used and they have plants and erection crews all over the US.

FWIW, I used "road bond" gravel. It packs well and tight. I have other areas where I used "regular gravel. Ten years later, the regular stuff still has not packed down.

Free standing metal carports themselves do not require a concrete floor. Now your town might. Area needs to be level first of course. Much prefer a vertical roof style, much less likely to leak and the snow will tend to slide off.

I got a 18 by 25 carport for my Escape 19, which is 19-6 long. The length is about perfect. I got 10 foot side wall height, 9 feet would have worked. Realize its much taller in the center. But I wanted a carport tall enough that if I ever got the Escape fifth wheel, it would be OK. My prior carport that I used for my Casita was too low (ouch). Cost to raise it up was about the same as a new carport. So now the Casita carport houses my Trillium.

My width is necessary due to the sharp angle I have to make to get into the carport. If I had a straight shot, a 12 foot wide carport would have worked. The Casita carport I have is 12 by 20.

First step is to your local building department to find out local requirements and permits. Even here in NC, the building department was a PITA, and they made the pouring of concrete very painful (made up additional requirements not in the code, because they "Could".
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Old 02-06-2020, 10:34 AM   #19
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If you live in an area subject to the ground freezing / frost heaving , the fill underneath the slab should be of sufficient depth and porosity to allow proper drainage .
I have seen concrete slabs ( drive ways , garage floors ) self destruct in a short period of time due to frost heaving / improper base
This is a prime reason why there are local codes which surpass the national code
The national code cannot take into account every regional variation
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Old 02-06-2020, 06:39 PM   #20
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I have used a variety of gravel. I discovered “road bond” late. This stuff packs. Meanwhile gravel I laid down ten years ago still hasn’t packed...
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