YOUNG 49 and looking for insight - Fiberglass RV


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Old 10-27-2018, 07:19 AM   #1
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YOUNG 49 and looking for insight

Fulltimers - Is there any of you that wish you would of have considered the lifestyle of full time RV living sooner than you did?


I'm committed to giving my children the best start in life as possible. My "empty nest" years are will soon be here and I want to support my children into their adult years also. However, I'm currently just trading money and work long hours, 55/60 each week. To be healthy physically I need to reduce my work hours to a lifestyle that promotes physically healthy choices including eating correctly and maintaining a better physical routine. Fulltiming would reduce the cost of permanent housing. I don't mind working and believe there are jobs anywhere, however those employment options usually don't pay huge incomes.


Maybe I'm just dreaming - and I know that is a good thing !!!


thanks for your input.
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Old 10-27-2018, 07:49 AM   #2
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...Fulltiming would reduce the cost of permanent housing.....
Sometimes yes, sometimes no.
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Old 10-27-2018, 08:10 AM   #3
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Best way to support children in their adult years is to set them up for success as a child. Provide leadership and guidance, leading to building skills and education so they can support themselves and prosper. My parents helped me make good decisions, particularly in high school and the early college years. One month after I graduated, their job was done, and my years as an adult responsible for myself began.

Instead of working during my later years, I worked harder in the early years WITH a plan. Started investing and saving as soon as I got out of college (age 21) with a plan to become debt free, live way beneath my means, save and invest like a demon, and retire at age 50. I worked that plan for 30 years, through multiple investment melt downs, years of high interest rates, inflation, oil crises, job loses and layoffs, and more. It helped to have an education where pay was good, and that was one of my first financial decisions. I also learned how to find a job early in my career, as the first company I worked for closed after 3 years. The plan worked, and when I was 50, I retired. Been retired now for 12 years, so its working so far.

The advantage of working your own plan is you are not stuck with some company's rules of when you can retire, nor government rules such as social security. By taking care of yourself, you have the ultimate in freedom. When you are ready, you go.

Now my friends that started thinking seriously about retirement savings and investing at a later age, are still working. The earlier you start, and the harder you save, the earlier you can reach financial freedom.


Proverbs 22:7: ..."the borrower is slave to the lender". Sage advice IMHO.


Dreams need to be married to plans with deliberate action steps, or they will just remain dreams.
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Old 10-27-2018, 09:28 AM   #4
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One month after I graduated, their job was done, and my years as an adult responsible for myself began.

I worked that plan for 30 years, through multiple investment melt downs, years of high interest rates, inflation, oil crises, job loses and layoffs, and more. It helped to have an education where pay was good, and that was one of my first financial decisions.

Thrifty bill, it sounds like you had great parents yourself and you were a great dad to your children. Not everyone had that opportunity from the start. There are also life circumstances that are out of your control, loss of a loved one, sickness/disease that has multiple layers of financial cost, divorce, another tragedy or loss. And remember, a proverb is just that a proverb, not a exact truth like other truths from The Scriptures.



That said, just because that worked for you, it won't work out like that for everyone. I agree, providing guidance and leadership and helping children set out on their own. Letting them know from a young age that they will be adults and make decisions as adults. For me, not letting them have a prolonged adolescents into their middle to late 20's or 30's as some parents allow. Again, that is for me, others are ok with the the prolonged adolescents, that is their choice.


I do like what you say, "Dreams need to be married to plans with deliberate action steps, or they will just remain dreams." - So gaining some insight here is fun for me now. Trust you have a great weekend. Thanks for the input.
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Old 10-27-2018, 09:55 AM   #5
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cheap rv living

Steve,


It sounds like an adventure. Check out the link below. This guy has been a full timer for years. Supports himself doing campground hosting and other seasonal jobs. His videos cover everything from where to go, where to work, other full time rv person interviews, different class rvs, even sanitary issues while boondocking. He is a very interesting guy.



https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAj...bkIR54hAn6Zz7A


Carl
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Old 10-27-2018, 10:00 AM   #6
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Steve,


Here is another hard core Rv person. Slim Potatohead. His videos are very professional. Nice reviews of boondocking places. Many equipment reviews and discussions. Camps all seasons.



https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5L...wZEnFsXA3TOx-g
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Old 10-27-2018, 10:33 AM   #7
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Supporting your children

What is your definition of supporting your children? On a weekly basis I see many different definitions and some are very destructive.
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Old 10-27-2018, 11:46 AM   #8
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What is your definition of supporting your children? On a weekly basis I see many different definitions and some are very destructive.

ehoepner, you brought up a great point and a clarification. My definition of support to my adult children is mostly emotional and being a sounding board for the decisions they make as adults. I am not planning on and would not support my children financially long term. If they needed help with a car repair I would help them, however if they carelessly (my opinion) spent their cash on say a large screen TV, because it was a must have for them or going to a concert/sporting event and spent a few bills and didn't have the cash to make that car repair, I would let them figure it out and they would be walking, riding a bicycle or taking public transportation. Support would also mean just being in their lives physically, if they choose to have me around. Adult children are ADULTS and I will treat them as such.
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Old 11-03-2018, 10:51 AM   #9
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You Never Know Until You Try...

Don't Die Wondering! Just Do It! Wish I had..
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Old 11-03-2018, 12:00 PM   #10
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The plan worked, and when I was 50, I retired. Been retired now for 12 years, so its working so far.
Well Bill, I'll certainly allow that you are evidently much more thrifty than I am civil.

But, I try!
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Old 12-23-2018, 08:57 AM   #11
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Thread getting a little old, but I guess I'm bored this morning.

One thing to consider is that wherever you go...there you are! The rv lifestyle will not help you become more active. In fact it often takes more motivation to be active. Head to an rv park or campground and you'll see more of the typical overweight America than a particularly active crowd.

I stay really active but it can be easy to get into lazy mode. You drive a ton and sit in and outside the trailer a ton, might not eat as well etc.

This is not a rule but especially with the retired crowd the rv lifestyle can very, very easily be a sedentary lifestyle. If you need to be more active, start those habits now, so they carry over into the rv lifestyle. They won't come "naturally" when you switch to an rv.

As Gordon alluded to, rv living isn't necessarily cheap. Most rv parks with full hookups are going to be at least $50/night. I ran the numbers once since I live in my camper all summer on public land for "free", and was looking into staying in my camper all winter. Even where I live, which is fairly cheap, a monthly rate at the rv park would be around $400/month. Right now I'm renting a house for $520 a month. I'm not going to pay $400 a month to live in my trailer all winter...
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Old 12-23-2018, 01:35 PM   #12
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ZachO,


thanks for the insight. the lifestyle change is in process. My "working life" has been nothing as normal. Never had a 40hr work week in my life. I just know I miss some extra activities (fishing, bicycle, backpacking, camping and hiking) that do promote a healthier lifestyle. My current employment allows me to pay my bills and stay current without going into debt, living within my means. At almost 50 my 55hrs a week of physical work does keep me somewhat healthy, but not in shape. I do like my down time, but I keep busy also ... I've had to learn to enjoy the process. I am thankful and grateful and look forward to a new chapter in my life. I also say there is no bad weather just illprepared clothing. Thanks again for the response.
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Old 12-23-2018, 02:17 PM   #13
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I never had a 40 hour week. 60 to 65 hours was the norm. I didn’t know many that worked just 40 hours. If anything, most people I knew people were working a lot more hours than me. And as a supervisor/manager I never got OT. It was always do what it took to get the job done. As a baby boomer, there were too many of us and too few good jobs. 40 hour week was a dream but not reality. At least I was well paid for this. I saved and invested like a maniac so I was able to walk away at 50.

I used to call it the new world order: “work twice as hard for half as much and be happy”.
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Old 12-24-2018, 09:35 AM   #14
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Good to hear. Well, not the over 40 hour part, but the changing lifestyle part!

When there's work to do, I work hard, but I prefer and do a good job of keeping my hours to 40 or less. I'm also taking little mini retirements while I'm young(ish), knowing there's no guarantee I'll make it to true retirement. But, I have no dependents, no debt and good health. So I can get away with it.
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Old 12-24-2018, 09:53 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by ZachO View Post
Good to hear. Well, not the over 40 hour part, but the changing lifestyle part!

When there's work to do, I work hard, but I prefer and do a good job of keeping my hours to 40 or less. I'm also taking little mini retirements while I'm young(ish), knowing there's no guarantee I'll make it to true retirement. But, I have no dependents, no debt and good health. So I can get away with it.
No debt is a great start! Too much of many people's income go to debt payments. Read up on the FIRE movement: financial independence retire early. One doesn't have to embrace everything in that movement, but there are some good learnings for sure. Retiring early doesn't just happen, its a journey. Part of my goal was to "maintain my standard of living while LOWERING my cost of living". I had no interest in a declining standard of living. But many can take individual spending categories in their budgets and reduce them. Clothing budget: think used, thrift stores. My wardrobe actually improved when I started buying thrift clothes. I went from lower priced new junky stuff, to higher end used stuff. Brands like LL Bean for example. The same can be done on food, insurance, utilities, the freakin' cable bill, etc. I lost my job at 40 years old, and the objective was to continue to live the same without tapping into savings while I was searching for a job (lived on my wife's income). We did it for six months. Would have been so easy to tap into our savings instead, which would have eliminated the chance of retiring at 50.
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Old 12-24-2018, 12:30 PM   #16
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Definitely. I won't be retiring early or having a "traditional" retirement even when I do retire, I know that at this point. But I worked for a state agency for almost ten years and I've let the retirement from that job sit, untouched. Whenever I can save enough now, I throw a little into an IRA at the end of the year. Makes me feel like I'm at least doing something toward retirement.

Rather than buy junk, I but quality stuff. Used is best, but I find lately that new or used, I have less and less of everything, but what I do have is very high quality, and built to last. I don't like buying junk. Only problem is if I get robbed or the trailer blows up or something...

I live well, and food is my biggest expense, by far. I'm ok with that. Keeps my health bills to a minimum.
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Old 12-24-2018, 01:46 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by stevebell View Post
Thrifty bill, it sounds like you had great parents yourself and you were a great dad to your children. Not everyone had that opportunity from the start. There are also life circumstances that are out of your control, loss of a loved one, sickness/disease that has multiple layers of financial cost, divorce, another tragedy or loss. And remember, a proverb is just that a proverb, not a exact truth like other truths from The Scriptures.



That said, just because that worked for you, it won't work out like that for everyone. I agree, providing guidance and leadership and helping children set out on their own. Letting them know from a young age that they will be adults and make decisions as adults. For me, not letting them have a prolonged adolescents into their middle to late 20's or 30's as some parents allow. Again, that is for me, others are ok with the the prolonged adolescents, that is their choice.


I do like what you say, "Dreams need to be married to plans with deliberate action steps, or they will just remain dreams." - So gaining some insight here is fun for me now. Trust you have a great weekend. Thanks for the input.
Truth is ... The borrower IS the servant of the lender, wherever the fault lies.


Circumstances are always better when met with responsibility.
I dealt with everything you listed in my life before I was 12YO and have been completely on my own since then, except I was not alone.

I understand that this is not the venue for religion, but many of us celebrate tomorrow with gifts for those we love, in remembrance of the great gift we have been given. The smallest part of which is the wisdom in Proverbs.


Compassion for those who fall is a good thing, but to project responsibility is foolish and makes you powerless over your own circumstances.


Merry Christmas!
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