13-year-old rubber - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-23-2020, 08:53 PM   #1
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13-year-old rubber

Recently bought a 21-foot 2007 TT with less than 1,000 miles on it. The original tires, all 5 of them, look fine. No sidewall cracks, and tread wear is consistent with the original owner's claims.

The trailer was parked mostly in the shade all those years, if that makes a difference. (How do I know it was parked in the shade? I bought it from a neighbor. It was in the side yard, and I drove or walked past it almost daily.)

Am I risking a blowout by not replacing them?
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Old 07-23-2020, 09:24 PM   #2
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According to tire manufacturers you are. There are many articles online concerning aged tires.

https://www.google.com/search?q=aged...hrome&ie=UTF-8

Folks tend to disagree about how many years to run tires before replacing them, but at 13 years I think you've "arrived".
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Old 07-23-2020, 09:37 PM   #3
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Yep, at 13 they're toast

Thanks for the link.
The takeaway: maybe ok from 6-10 years of age, but definitely should be scrapped at 10. At 13 the're over the hill.
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Old 07-23-2020, 10:36 PM   #4
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Old tires

Quote:
Originally Posted by Al Bear View Post
Thanks for the link.
The takeaway: maybe ok from 6-10 years of age, but definitely should be scrapped at 10. At 13 the're over the hill.
I would not run 5 years if the tire was made in china. Tires do a LOT of damage when they blow.
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Old 07-23-2020, 11:43 PM   #5
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I would not run 5 years if the tire was made in china. Tires do a LOT of damage when they blow.

So, are you trying to say that if the tires are made someplace other than China, they are just fine for five years or more?
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Old 07-24-2020, 05:39 AM   #6
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There is no prize for running the oldest tires, and tires are relatively cheap. A blow out can do expensive damage.

Risk/reward here, I don't see much on the reward side, and a lot on the risk side. I would never, ever, pull a trailer with 13 year old tires.


FWIW: Sitting that long, I would assume bearings and brakes have had zero maintenance too. Grease does not age well. I'd be pulling those wheels off and doing a complete service.

As far as bashing China, most of us make those comments via a computer made in ..... China. In my own manufacturing experience, you can get great products made in China, crap products too, and everything in between. Its all about who is making them, and to what specs. I've had some really great Apple computer products made in China. And I have had some really crappy hand tools from China. How they can make an iPhone yet not make a decent screwdriver is one of those mysteries. I've had excellent service out of Carlisle tires, made in China.
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Old 07-24-2020, 06:25 AM   #7
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13-year-old rubber

What Bill said. Replace the tires and service brakes and bearings. As far as I know, thereís only one ST tire NOT made in China, and thatís the Goodyear Endurance. Good tire, premium price. Among the made-in-China ST brands, Carlisle and Maxxis have good reputations.

When you buy new tires, ask to check the date codes (WWYY). I have occasionally been offered new old stock (over a year in storage).

Five years is very conservative. Many people go 6-8 years with proper care and storage. Reputable shops will not service a tire over 10 years old, so Iíd consider that an upper limit.

As Bill says, itís a risk-reward calcination. I ran tires on a local-use utility trailer for 14 years until one failed. Might have gone longer except I neglected to check the air pressure once and ran it low. Worst that could happen on the utility trailer is a little bending of the heavy steel fenders.

I am much more conservative with my fiberglass travel trailer. Wish they had the same size- five years on the Scamp and another five years on the utility- less waste. Hmmm...
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Old 07-24-2020, 06:44 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
So, are you trying to say that if the tires are made someplace other than China, they are just fine for five years or more?
I'm saying that I would never try to get 5 years out of a China tire. I also will not buy from a dealer that says, “we do not balance trailer tires”, they need to be balanced.
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Old 07-24-2020, 06:58 AM   #9
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13-year-old rubber

Donít be too hard on the dealers. Most ST tires are mounted on utility trailers, where it really doesnít matter much. Iíve never had a dealer refuse to balance a trailer tire when requested. Have you?
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Old 07-24-2020, 07:01 AM   #10
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Trailer tires are relatively inexpensive for piece of mind.

Nothing worse than a blow-out, had one on my van when I thought the tires looked good, and they did, had ample tread, but it was the age factor I ignored. Thankfully I didn't hurt anyone on the highway, only my ego was bruised.

Did some damage to my van in the wheel well area.

Tires at high speed will chew up fiberglass, and be a potentially expensive fix.

The risk to yourselves and others is what should drive you to get new tires. Fiberglass can be fixed.

I apologize for being direct. I learned my lesson on this and feel strongly about it.
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Old 07-24-2020, 07:39 AM   #11
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I look at tires like insurance, a necessary expense to keep you safe. I tend to buy tires for my vehicle that have the best grip ratings rather than the best wear ratings. I figure it's cheaper to buy tires than to be in an accident. You have to wonder how slick some of these 100,000 mile tires are when on a damp road. Having that extra grip has saved me from accidents on several occasions. The other thing is if I pick up a puncture, I replace the tire. I don't repair and reuse. I let someone else do that (my tire guy gives me a discount on the new one, repairs the old and sells it).
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Old 07-24-2020, 11:15 AM   #12
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I look at tires like insurance, a necessary expense to keep you safe. I tend to buy tires for my vehicle that have the best grip ratings rather than the best wear ratings. I figure it's cheaper to buy tires than to be in an accident. You have to wonder how slick some of these 100,000 mile tires are when on a damp road. Having that extra grip has saved me from accidents on several occasions. The other thing is if I pick up a puncture, I replace the tire. I don't repair and reuse. I let someone else do that (my tire guy gives me a discount on the new one, repairs the old and sells it).


Nooooo way would I trust tires that old...
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Old 07-27-2020, 07:01 AM   #13
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Carlisle trailer tires

Don't remember the model but we had two Carlisle trailer tires blow out on our boat (~2500lbs). Tire shop recommended Goodyear Marathon's and they've worked well. Don't know where either made.
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Old 07-27-2020, 07:40 AM   #14
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Marathons were Chinese-made and actually had a poor reputation for premature failure. The newer Goodyear Endurance is US-made and seems to have a pretty good reputation.
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Old 07-31-2020, 10:33 AM   #15
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Maxxis are made in Thailand. I've had two sets (E-rated 15") and have been very satisfied.

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Old 08-01-2020, 11:22 AM   #16
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As for made in China, or anywhere else, I believe it's all about the who and what of the specifications.

A distributor/seller can specify Good, Fast, or Cheap.
Pick any two:
Good and fast won't be cheap.
Good and cheap won't be fast.
Fast and cheap won't be good.

I have a small metal lathe made in the Sieg machine tool factory in Shanghai, China. They make many of the mini-lathes sold by various distributors. Al the machines are similar, but will have different features -- some will have plastic parts where others have metal parts because that's what was specified to meet a price point.

Tires are no different. A company can specify a long-wearing rubber compound, or a more grippy compound, tread pattern, and type and number of plys. Different brands with different qualities may come out of the same factory.

Remember when made in Japan meant crap? Remember when optics made in Japan surpassed German optic quality?

Remember when made in Korea meant crap? Same story. China? Same story.

I remember when Harbor Freight was mail order, and the products were very marginal. Now most of their tools rival the quality of the name brands.

Where something was made means a lot less to me than the reputation of the name on the product.

--Harold
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Old 08-02-2020, 09:57 AM   #17
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I like the good, fast, and cheap concept. An old toolmaker friend said something similar. A purchase is based on quality, price, and delivery. Pick 2 but you can't have all 3.
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Old 08-02-2020, 01:36 PM   #18
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These tires could be even older than 13 years. The original factory supplied tires on my 1994 Bigfoot were made in 1992.
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Old 08-02-2020, 03:26 PM   #19
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What Bill said. Replace the tires and service brakes and bearings. As far as I know, thereís only one ST tire NOT made in China, and thatís the Goodyear Endurance.
There are only two major American-owned tire manufacturers: Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. and Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. Each of them has multiple manufacturing plants in the U.S. Hercules tires are a favorite of long haul truckers, and I could find few complaints about them online, so I run their ST tires (Cooper is the parent company of Hercules.)
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Old 08-02-2020, 04:21 PM   #20
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Thatís interesting. First mention Iíd heard of Hercules ST tires. Do they carry the Hercules name or some other?
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