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Old 03-10-2019, 03:00 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by redbarron55 View Post
Why would Dexter introduce a spindle that would easily fail?
I worked in government for far too long to think that just because a thing makes sense, that it will be. Or just because it makes absolutely no sense, that it won't be.

I don't trust that a new product which claims to make maintenance easier is necessarily an improvement, without verification. So, based on all the people who "hate" the ez lube axle, I was open to the possibility that it's a solution in search of a problem which actually ends up causing a problem.

Anyway. I'll take these tips for maintenance and be happy with my axle.
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Old 03-10-2019, 09:42 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by ZachO View Post
I worked in government for far too long to think that just because a thing makes sense, that it will be. Or just because it makes absolutely no sense, that it won't be.

I don't trust that a new product which claims to make maintenance easier is necessarily an improvement, without verification. So, based on all the people who "hate" the ez lube axle, I was open to the possibility that it's a solution in search of a problem which actually ends up causing a problem.

Anyway. I'll take these tips for maintenance and be happy with my axle.
This "new" product is decades old.
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Old 03-11-2019, 08:19 AM   #23
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These new fangled lube systems can't be trusted.
This is what I use:


Wheel-grease containers were among the tools most wagons needed for simple maintenance. At first only leftover meat greases and tallow were used on axles. They were often carried in ox-horn containers, looped together with a chain and mounted over the rear axle during transit. Meat grease lubrication was kept at a minimum because of its short supply, but history also records that in emergencies, fatback - today's bacon - was sliced and wrapped around wheel spindles as a lubricant.
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Old 03-11-2019, 09:11 AM   #24
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Well, I'll accept the insinuations that I'm a dinosaur, knowing I'm as guilty of it as anyone else on this forum. I may be cherry-picking, but it seems to me when ez lube axles come up around here, most people criticize them.

I guess I can either assume the ez lube is not one of those solutions-looking-for-a-problem, or that I'm only hearing from the proponents and everyone else has bailed

Either way, now I know two things. Ez lube isn't a new thing, and JD travels in a covered wagon.
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Old 03-11-2019, 09:28 AM   #25
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Either way, now I know two things. Ez lube isn't a new thing, and JD travels in a covered wagon.

You found me out!
Meant in fun, by the way.

Basically there are few people who have used the features of the EZ Lube that are negative, mostly people who don't like the idea and are familiar with the old methods.
If you really want a low maintenance reliable system is to go to oil lubed bearings, because the oil saturated into the soap and clay of the grease is what actually lubricated the bearing.
The new oil lube systems have sight glasses that allow for inspection.

https://www.etrailer.com/p-XLPROLUBE1980KIT.html

If you have EZ lube the grease fitting in the center of the spindle would have to be removed and plugged
(remove the Bacon too)
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Old 03-11-2019, 09:42 AM   #26
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I have made my living repairing boats for 45 years, And grease thousands of these every year now.
If you grease them according to these instructions

https://www.dexteraxle.com/resources...-z-lube-system
There is no pressure buildup in hub at all, It would escape thru the rubber cap (which is why it can be filled as much as it is).
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Old 03-11-2019, 10:43 AM   #27
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Just so I'm clear: The EZ Lube axle allows me to lube the axle without cleaning and repacking the bearings? But I still need to pull things apart on occasion to check the brakes, etc.

Or do I still need to occasionally clean and repack the old, old fashioned way (not so old fashioned as to require bacon, but, you know)?
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Old 03-11-2019, 10:59 AM   #28
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Just so I'm clear: The EZ Lube axle allows me to lube the axle without cleaning and repacking the bearings? But I still need to pull things apart on occasion to check the brakes, etc.

Or do I still need to occasionally clean and repack the old, old fashioned way (not so old fashioned as to require bacon, but, you know)?
The answer is it depends.
The braked need to be inspected occasionally and at that time you can relube per old style bearings and replace the seals, etc.

We have towed the Scamp (not the Conestoga wagon) about 18 - 20,000 miles and I have not felt compelled to pull the hubs and do a brake job.
However many do that each year.
I can argue with someone who wants to do that, but I think it is overkill and a Scamp at least.
Basically listen for brake dragging and scraping and feel the hubs everytime you stop and after perhaps the first 50 miles.
The hubs will be warmer after you grease them until the grease is distributed from the races to the "dead" space around them.
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Old 03-11-2019, 02:04 PM   #29
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Yes, like everything. It depends.

Alright, thanks.
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Old 03-11-2019, 03:03 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintageracer View Post
Easy lubes are for BOAT trailers due to their submersion in water not RV trailers!
CORRECTION


EZ Lube are for trailers that don't get submersed in water.
Bearing Buddies are for boat trailers.
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Old 03-11-2019, 03:47 PM   #31
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I learned something today and I really appreciate it!

The prairie schooner's wheels are dished out for greater strength, and to make the spokes perpendicular to the axle for maximum strength while supporting a load.

"At first only leftover meat greases and tallow were used on axles. They were often carried in ox-horn containers, looped together with a chain and mounted over the rear axle during transit."

The subtleties of designs, and old fashioned ways, are interesting to discover. Some things can seem very simple or even crude, but actually have had a lot of thought put into them. Obtaining wheel bearing grease as a byproduct of normal cooking, eliminates one more thing they had to plan for or find when needed. I wonder how often they had to grease those bearings?


I live where those folks started out on their final push over the Sierra Nevada range. Various stations in Carson Valley were the last provisioning points before they started up over Carson Pass out of Woodfords, or up the Sonora-Mono road over the Sonora Pass, or up Dagget Pass Trail that is now the Kingsbury grade from Genoa to Tahoe.

Thanks for that JD!
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Old 03-11-2019, 03:49 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman View Post
CORRECTION


EZ Lube are for trailers that don't get submersed in water.
Bearing Buddies are for boat trailers.
Did you see post #12?
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:09 PM   #33
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Lightbulb Parkliner Axles

So, I got the Parkliner 2016, out of it's storage spot.
Decided to check the wheel bearings. They were fine, just a slight amount of play in the bearings.
Found that the trailing arms are at an upward angle. The cross tube is lower than the spindles. Seems that would limit the range of travel when a tire hits a bump.

Floyd, how often would you add grease to the E-Z Lubes?
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Old 06-17-2019, 02:07 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by Wayne Collins View Post
So, I got the Parkliner 2016, out of it's storage spot.
Decided to check the wheel bearings. They were fine, just a slight amount of play in the bearings.
Found that the trailing arms are at an upward angle. The cross tube is lower than the spindles. Seems that would limit the range of travel when a tire hits a bump.

Floyd, how often would you add grease to the E-Z Lubes?
The best answer might be "now and then" but prolly about once a year.
Usually in January when I check everything on the trailer while its in my warm shop before I venture out in the cold and head for Florida.
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Old 06-17-2019, 03:49 PM   #35
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No, I'm sure these are EZ-Lubes The rubber cap has the right letters on them.
unfortunately I tore one trying to pry it out.
Will see if a local shop can grease them for me.
wc
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Old 06-17-2019, 04:38 PM   #36
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Originally Posted by redbarron55 View Post
Basically there are few people who have used the features of the EZ Lube that are negative, mostly people who don't like the idea and are familiar with the old methods.
That is a somewhat insulting generalization. I am “negative” about EZ Lube and it has nothing to do with familiarity with the “old methods” and everything to do with what is required (by its design) for the EZ Lube axle to actually deliver “fresh” grease into the outer bearings rather than just to the inner bearings.
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Old 06-17-2019, 05:29 PM   #37
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Of course this instructions say to slowly pump grease into the axle until fresh grease comes out of the hub...
I think that takes care of the inner and outer bearings.
You should add GREASE SLOWLY, while turning the wheel, warm grease helps, too.
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Old 06-17-2019, 06:09 PM   #38
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The Dexter manual seems to be referring to both types of bearings when it states: "Bearings should be lubricated every 12 months or 12,000 miles".

I'm not completely comfortable with the hubs being clear full of grease, with just a small air space behind the cap, when these are running along at high speed and temperature. Nor do I like the idea that the bearings never get inspected, and the seals never get replaced, if someone simply pumps grease in every so often. But Dexter knows a lot more about it than I do.

Seems like a good idea to take them apart every five years or so, depending on the mileage, to replace the seals, inspect the bearings and adjust the nut. Besides, it's time to look at the brakes by then. The seals are not re-useable.

Also, it seems like a good idea to use Dexter seals. The cheap ones are likely to let grease out the back and ruin the shoes.
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Old 06-17-2019, 07:07 PM   #39
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I have used both methods without trouble but I do like seeing those bearings up close and personal every once in a while. One thing to remember is to be careful about mixing different greases.Some types are compatible and others are not. Best to stick to one brand if it works for you. I also carry 2 complete sets of bearings including replacement seals and caps. I have them pre-greased and stored in sealed plastic containers. The bearings may save me someday or help out someone in need along the way!
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Old 06-17-2019, 07:39 PM   #40
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David,

Great idea about "pre-greasing" the bearings. Reduce corrosion, reduce the hassle when installing.

I also carry a punch I made for knocking the races out, as well as extra bearings and seals. I made the punch from a piece of 1/2" diameter cold rolled steel about 14" long. Straight, and hard enough to do the trick, but softer than the bearing race. It is ground off square on both ends. Apparently, Dexter used to make and sell brass punches for this purpose, but don't anymore.

The hard part is getting the seals out. Dexter glues them in and a simple pry bar or large screwdriver is not sufficient. That is, unless you are a serious badass and really mad while doing it! I found that a Knipex 22" slide jaw Cobra plier, that grabs the seal's inner flange, and then is pounded on with a large hammer, will pry it out.

A while back, I saw a tandem axle travel trailer where a wheel bearing had failed and ruined the axle. The spindle area was all scorched and ground down from running with a destroyed bearing for a long time. It had probably been using the brake shoes as the wheel bearings for a while. The tow truck driver had tied that end of axle up and was on his way to the shop. Another benefit of tandem axles in an emergency, just tie it up and proceed. Better than tying a tree branch under there to run on, if you have a single axle.
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