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Old 02-25-2019, 11:59 AM   #21
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Name: Russell
Trailer: Casita
Arizona
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As a two-time owner of Casitaís, with two different Ridgeline TVís (2006 and current 2012), I am not the least annoyed by the allegation that the Honda is not a truck. Neither is it a sedan, sports car, motorcycle, SUV, or dune buggy. Instead it is more versatile than any of the above, can do nearly anything a Tacoma, Frontier, or Canyon can do, and has useful features that none of them have, while riding and handling better than any of them. Annoyed? On the contrary; Iím thankfully content in the knowledge that my choice is not a truck.
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Old 02-27-2019, 12:28 PM   #22
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A first generation Honda Ridgeline is one of only 2 vehicles in all my Motorsport's activities I have ever heard EVERYONE I personally know who OWNS ONE says the same thing.

One of if not the BEST VEHICLE they have ever owned.

Build quality, performance, ride, storage, trailer tow, comfort and longevity are all terms owners use to describe their Ridgeline's. People who own Ridgeline's are NOT truck people. They don't want a car. They don't want a truck. They don't want an SUV.

What's that leave you?

A Honda Ridgeline!

Interestingly enough ALL of those same owners I know that have looked at the "New" Honda Ridgeline say they will NOT buy a new one. All have said the same thing that the new Ridgeline is to car like in appearance, driving and design. No where near the concept of the original Ridgeline. Several of those same people have already purchased a second newer year model lower mileage 1st Gen Ridgeline to replace their 300K mile original Ridgeline's.

Ya they like em that much!
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Old 02-27-2019, 04:15 PM   #23
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while full frame, live axle, rear wheel drive is a primitive setup, its optimal for towing in a very important fashion..... IRS systems, such as my 1993 Mercedes 300CE's 5-way multilink, have far more moving parts to get stressed by the heavy load of towing... a leaf spring live axle, as is found on most trucks, has very few moving parts that push the vehicle down the road. my mercedes, there's at least 10 main suspension bushings plus dual CV joints on the half axles of that rear end, plus the bushings mounting the differential to the subframe, and yet more bushings mounting the subframe to the chassis, all these are stressed far more by the load of towing the trailer than by regular driving. A primarily FWD vehicle, which includes most all "AWD", you can add the steering ball joints, struts, tie rod tips, and steering box to the stressed members.

sure, if you only keep vehicles a few years, and only tow a fairly light trailer, you'll get away with it, obviously many FWD owners here do (highlanders, ridgelines, pilots, etc).
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Old 02-28-2019, 07:08 AM   #24
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Iíve routinely kept my unibody vehicles 12-14 years and 200K+ miles. Our current two are at 155K and 180K, nothing but regular maintenance. Both are in excellent condition, and Iím expecting to run both to 250K at least. None of those things you list have required attention, and even if one or two items do require replacement before Iím done, the overall cost of operation is still quite low.

There are certainly good reasons to buy a truck, and a heavier trailer is one of them. But within their rated capabilities, thereís no reason a unibody vehicle cannot be a reliable and long lasting tow vehicle.

However, in the context of this thread- limited budget and up to a 17í molded trailer- I think the OP will have better results with used trucks. And he did say thatís what he wanted, which is the biggest reason people buy trucks, anyway.
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Old 02-28-2019, 09:00 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vintageracer View Post
A first generation Honda Ridgeline is one of only 2 vehicles in all my Motorsport's activities I have ever heard EVERYONE I personally know who OWNS ONE says the same thing.

One of if not the BEST VEHICLE they have ever owned.

Build quality, performance, ride, storage, trailer tow, comfort and longevity are all terms owners use to describe their Ridgeline's. People who own Ridgeline's are NOT truck people. They don't want a car. They don't want a truck. They don't want an SUV.

What's that leave you?

A Honda Ridgeline!

Interestingly enough ALL of those same owners I know that have looked at the "New" Honda Ridgeline say they will NOT buy a new one. All have said the same thing that the new Ridgeline is to car like in appearance, driving and design. No where near the concept of the original Ridgeline. Several of those same people have already purchased a second newer year model lower mileage 1st Gen Ridgeline to replace their 300K mile original Ridgeline's
Honda has made a few unique models where the owners are very loyal: the S2000, the Ridgeline and the Element are come to mind. Talk to their owners, they love their car.

Honda in their great decision making abandoned these lower volume niche models to instead crank out the same old same old that all of their competitors make. Is an Accord better than a Campy? Is a Civic better than a Corolla? I have no idea! But no one made a vehicle that compared to any of the three above.

We regularly look for a clean low mile replacement for our Element as well.

At least in the case of the Ridgeline they kept the model name alive.
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Old 02-28-2019, 09:58 AM   #26
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Hear you, Bill. Our Ď06 CR-V (same chassis and drivetrain as your Element) is an amazing vehicle. Timing chain driven, so the only maintenance in 13 years and 180K miles has been fluid/filter changes and one set of spark plugs. Total unscheduled repairs, $0. Original brakes still good. Itís survived two accidents (one $5K rear ender caused by a distracted driver and one $10K frontal T-bone caused by a stop sign runner) with zero damage to the unibody frame. Everything just works. They donít make them like that anymore.

Our teenage daughter is now learning to drive on it (love the console-mounted emergency brake!). Holding my breath...
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Old 02-28-2019, 10:16 AM   #27
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Name: Cheryl
Trailer: Looking While I Continue to Work
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Can a 1st Gen Ridgeline tow a 19' Scamp 5th Wheel?

Lots of great info on this thread.

I'm considering the purchase of a 19' Scamp 5th wheel.
Also available from the owner is a 2004.5 Dodge Ram, 2WD, LB with the classic Cummins engine.

I plan to use my TV as my primary vehicle for shopping and driving to work and worry that this is a lot of truck to drive around every day.
Is anyone aware of the older Ridgeline's towing the Scamp gooseneck?
Thanks for letting me jump in with this question.
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Old 02-28-2019, 10:29 AM   #28
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Only heard of one, and it required a custom fabricated hitch.

Be aware that the Scamp 19 comes in two different suspension heights, standard and raised, which must be matched to the truck.
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Old 02-28-2019, 11:55 AM   #29
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lateral thinking moment...


Also consider a full sized van. They can be less expensive, are built on truck frames, tow well and have a lot of nice storage. They can be had in a 1/2 ton or 3/4 ton form factor. Look at the vans in the commercial section of the lot - no frills and a good use of funds
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Old 02-28-2019, 12:27 PM   #30
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Great thought (though not for a Scamp 19, of course). Lots of protected, secure cargo storage for bicycles, small kayaks, and other camp gear. Typically less towing capacity than a pick-up but more payload. Regular wheelbase models park in a smaller footprint. Driving dynamics can be... well... rudimentary.
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Old 02-28-2019, 01:44 PM   #31
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Name: Justus
Trailer: Currently Shopping
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thrifty bill View Post
Honda has made a few unique models where the owners are very loyal: the S2000, the Ridgeline and the Element are come to mind. Talk to their owners, they love their car.

Honda in their great decision making abandoned these lower volume niche models to instead crank out the same old same old that all of their competitors make. Is an Accord better than a Campy? Is a Civic better than a Corolla? I have no idea! But no one made a vehicle that compared to any of the three above.

We regularly look for a clean low mile replacement for our Element as well.

At least in the case of the Ridgeline they kept the model name alive.
If you want to know why they cut models, just look at sales volume. There's no deception or malice toward current owners, and there's certainly no shortsightedness on Honda's part. It's a purely financial decision. Honda's automotive business, like any car manufacturer, makes more money per unit sold as the number of units sold increases. If sales volume isn't where it needs to be or moving that way--bye bye!

I really like the 2017 Ridgeline redesign. I don't particularly want a truck. I want something that gets the mileage and has the comfort to be a daily driver with the utility of a truck. It's main draw for me over the Tacoma et al is the mileage and the interior design. I could care less whether or not it "feels like a truck" because most of my time will be spent driving to work or running errands--not hauling or offroading. That said, reviewers and owners tend to rave about the driving experience. The high entry price point and lack of trims is a major downside. You want AWD? That's going to cost you $35,000 because you can't get it on the base model (according to Honda, lower-cost models with AWD "just weren't selling"). Compare that to the following 4x4 Crew Cabs: Colorado at $31,600; Tacoma at $31,800; or Frontier at $29,400.

I really want to say that Honda doesn't produce niche products, but that's what this is. Their market is people like me who aren't truck people, but want truck-like utility without resorting to a crossover or SUV. And that market has only been 1% of the mid-size truck market since the redesign. Doesn't get much more niche than that, and they don't seem to be driving to gain a larger market share--again, the high entry price point hurts them there.

It may suffer the same fate as the first Ridgeline beause it may already be perfect--at least to Honda. Here is a very telling excerpt from an article on the Ridgeline's price and lack of trim levels:

Quote:
t’s not difficult to see that Honda is once again positioning the Ridgeline in what many conventional pickup truck buyers will consider an uncomfortable price bracket. It’s important, if Honda is going to remove affordability from the Ridgeline AWD’s character traits, that Honda doesn’t afflict the second Ridgeline with another first-gen fault: a striking lack of updates. In America’s hugely active truck sector, Honda can’t leave the uncomfortably pricey second-generation Ridgeline alone for three years, let alone five or ten like last time.
How much can Honda improve on it without driving the cost up even further, thereby squeezing out even more potential buyers? For thousands less, I can get any other mid-size pickup base model. I can get a full-size F-150 or RAM for the same price. Even having pegged the Ridgeline as "the one" as soon as I started looking at it, knowing that I can get a cheaper truck that hauls more by giving up some interior comfort makes me question whether the Ridgeline is really right for me. The next few years will be very telling because it will show whether Honda is able (and willing) to give the new Ridgeline its first facelift or move it into a more competitive price bracket.

We can discuss it until we're blue in the face (I believe I have done just that), but the new Ridgeline is not a good option for Steve due to it's lack of a 4x4 option, low towing capacity compared to the mid-size segment, and the high cost of used models. Steve, these are the steps we took to buy our last "new to us" car and we regret nothing:

After determining the capabilities we wanted, I turned to Consumer Reports. It is not free, but the cost is nominal compared to the investment you are making and I found having all the information in one spot was well worth the cost. I used CR to look at our category (mid-size and full-size SUVs) and narrow down my list using reliability, owner satisfaction, and cost. With list in hand, I scoured autotrader for low-mileage models near me and made a new list to keep track of them. On the weekend we called dealerships to confirm availability and then went test driving. Test drive everything you are interested in. Test drive the same truck at different trim levels if you can. Research used car buying if you've never done it before; even if you have, brush up on negotiating. Most important in my mind is to know the net value of the car you're buying, i.e. the wholesale value of the new car minus the wholesale value of your trade in. You're not going to get that price (the salesperson has to put food on the table!) but you can use it to gauge whether you're being taken for a ride or to negotiate just a little bit more off of their "best and final offer." In our case it was a "measly" $750, but that was enough to land the sale. Know typical dealer fees for your area, find out what each dealership charges up front, and integrate that into your negotiating if necessary.
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Old 02-28-2019, 02:02 PM   #32
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Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
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I calculate my max tow weight loaded and use a vehicle with double that capacity.
There is no fuel economy advantage to using a tug that is maxed out. The engine works hard and uses fuel accordingly. I get better fuel mileage using my 3/4 for towing than my 1/2 ton and I can climb any hill I wish too easily.
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Old 02-28-2019, 03:39 PM   #33
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Driving home after our 49 anniversary lunch ( chicken fingers for her and dry ribs for me ), we were passed by a black Toyota TRD 4x4. I said, that's what I want ( the RAV4 is almost 11 years old ). She said, "you can get one after I'm gone". I'm not sure if her time is up, or if she's leaving me.
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Old 03-01-2019, 07:43 AM   #34
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Smart gal, Glenn. Think she would go for a 4Runner? They come in black, too.

Next year try some flowers with the chicken fingers and maybe sheíll warm up to the TRD.

Dry ribs?... It fits, somehow.
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Old 03-01-2019, 08:01 AM   #35
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Name: To Infinity & Beyond!
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Tennessee
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Van? Did somebody say Van?

Here' our 2001 Chevrolet Express 3500 4WD van with the 8.1 litre V8 (496 CI) former ATF Bomber Van we have in the "Family" Fleet that will pull any none 5th wheel fiberglass trailer with ease!

Probably a "Little" overkill for pulling the Uhaul fiberglass trailer however it works well for Overlanding types of off-road trips & expeditions!!!

How about that?

Post 496 on this site talking about the 496 in our van!

Imagine that?
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ATF Van 1.jpg  
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Old 03-01-2019, 11:10 AM   #36
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Comparison test Tacoma/Colorado/Ranger

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Old 03-02-2019, 11:12 AM   #37
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Name: Doug
Trailer: Aliner
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Consider the Canyon/Colorado

You should consider adding the Canyon/Colorado to your list -- V6 with the crew cab. Not sure why you would need AWD, because that adds significantly to the cost. I purchased my Canyon last summer, and found it tows my Aliner with ease, and gets pretty decent fuel economy to boot.
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Old 03-02-2019, 11:16 AM   #38
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Name: Scott
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2wd v 4wd

Please keep in mind that in most cases a 2wd will tow more than a 4wd. Do you need 4wd for other applications?
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Old 03-02-2019, 11:16 AM   #39
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Name: Patrick
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Just got my latest issue of Consumerís Report and for dependability Toyota tops the list....however...for max towing the Ford 150 tops that list.
The Tacoma V6 comes in at 6,500 lbs towing capacity and should meet most folks needs.
First pick the trailer you will be towing then find a truck that fits all your needs.

Good Luck and Happy Camping !
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Old 03-02-2019, 11:28 AM   #40
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Trailer: 2014 Escape 15A being converted for off-road travel...
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Although I'm a big flag waver for all things LandCruiser...after witnessing the failure of the transfercase in my buddy's '16 Tacoma and having to strap him out 60-miles to pavement you couldn't give me a Tacoma. And the problem is well documented.

Probably outside of your $15k budget but '06 & '07(Classic) GM LBZ will pull any trailer < 10klbs like its not there (15,900lb tow rating) and get north of 16mpg on the highway. And plenty of these specimens with over 500k miles with not much more than basic maintenance.
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