Possible towing issues - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-25-2020, 03:08 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Civilguy's Avatar
 
Name: Mike
Trailer: Escape 21 & Jeep GC 5.7 (Previous 2012 Casita FD17 & 2010 Audi Q5)
Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 1,169
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Danny L View Post
I have two main concerns about towing if I were to purchase an RV The first is blind right hand merges. These merges are difficult even in a regular vehicle. I would imagine they would be even more difficult if I were towing an RV.

Secondly, I am an amateur astronomer. My hobby often involves driving through large cities when traveling to western observing cites in Oklahoma or New Mexico. For the past three years several cities have had major construction on their highways. Even with a GPS,navigating through the constructions zones in a car is a nightmare. How do you resolve issues driving through construction zones? Danny L
When in urban areas such as Seattle-Bellevue and the Bay Area where some drivers tend to be more "less friendly", I rarely but occasionally resort to the same approach I use when not towing; I move to where I want to go. I call it the "I'm telling, not asking" approach.

Please note that due to road rage, as well as common courtesy, this technique should be applied very judiciously.

Some people don't appreciate the constraints that heavy trucks and those towing trailers operate under. As an example, some folks will slip in front of a semi and then apply their brakes sharply to exit, not realizing that the Kenworth on their back bumper doesn't have the same ability to brake. Likewise, many folks seem to think the freeway is the place to slow down for the exit, as opposed to the exit ramp.

Additionally, some people who see an RV or trailer or box truck apparently experience an overwhelming compulsion to NOT be behind it. When you are merging onto a freeway, they will attempt to pass while you are attempting to merge and running out of shoulder. When left the choice, I won't be driven off the road or left stopped at the side. I will respectfully but firmly merge.

Keeping constantly apprised of the scene in the mirrors and maintaining a constant situational awareness is important.

I also appreciate having an adequately-powered vehicle which will accelerate under load.

Finally, I mount our Garmin up on the dash right next to the steering wheel like a heads-up display. I've found this really helpful in urban areas when you need to change lanes to set up for an exit, or where a major freeway's lanes split into two freeways. I find that our 8.4" in-dash system is located WAY to far down-and-right to look at it quickly. The 4.3" Garmin on the dash works much better when I am tracking six or more lanes of freeway at speed.

Finally, we shut down the idle chatter and focus on the task at hand when the driving requires our full attention. My co-pilot has developed into a useful member of the team, consulting the GPS, maps, and mirrors as applicable to the moment. (I have read some PMs from some of you indicating that I am very fortunate in that regard!)

There are definitely those moments when every little bit helps.
Attached Thumbnails
GPS Dash Mount.jpg  
__________________

__________________
~ "Discussions should be conducted without fondness for dispute or desire for victory." - Benjamin Franklin ~
Civilguy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2020, 03:33 PM   #22
Member
 
nefldiver's Avatar
 
Name: ROY AND BETH
Trailer: BIGFOOT 21 FB
Florida
Posts: 62
Registry
Go slightly slower than the traffic so that you always keep a big gap between you and the car in front of you. Stay in your lane and pay attention. Pulling a 16 or 17 foot Casita with a 1500 Chevy is easy peasy. At 70 miles an hour you hardly know it's behind you. The trailer aerodynamics are great because of the rounded shape and it's not too tall so it fits in the slipstream of the tow vehicle. It doesn't break any new air. I now have a 21 foot Bigfoot and it is quite a bit more of a challenge to toe then our 16 or 17 foot casitas. Totally is something of a mindset. You have to take a big giant chill pill, and don't expect to accelerate quickly or stop quickly. I tow a lawn trailer or a boat or a travel trailer about 95 to 98% of the time I'm driving. So it comes as second nature to me. Even when I don't have a trailer behind me I'm in the habit of swinging wide at intersections
__________________

nefldiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2020, 03:49 PM   #23
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 1,034
I went from a 17' Casita to a 27' BF 25RQ with cargo box. It's the cargo box that adds about 2' to the otherwise 25' (or so)BF. I found the BF to tow better than the Casita... forward in a straight line that is. Backing up is a bit more difficult and I can't get into those sites that are angled a bit more sharply or a narrower. Also be aware of right turns and be sure to use your mirrors. Oh, also, when turning and backing up, go slow.
__________________
2019 Big Foot 25RQ with cargo box and onboard Cummins LP 2500 generator, 2019 Ram 2500 4x4, 6.7L Cummins
Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2020, 04:19 PM   #24
Member
 
nefldiver's Avatar
 
Name: ROY AND BETH
Trailer: BIGFOOT 21 FB
Florida
Posts: 62
Registry
Also go really slow and backing up and roll the windows down so you can hear when it starts to get expensive
nefldiver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2020, 07:02 PM   #25
Senior Member
 
Civilguy's Avatar
 
Name: Mike
Trailer: Escape 21 & Jeep GC 5.7 (Previous 2012 Casita FD17 & 2010 Audi Q5)
Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 1,169
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by nefldiver View Post
Also go really slow and backing up and roll the windows down so you can hear when it starts to get expensive
Thanks for the laugh.
__________________
~ "Discussions should be conducted without fondness for dispute or desire for victory." - Benjamin Franklin ~
Civilguy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2020, 09:50 PM   #26
Senior Member
 
Doctor Harold's Avatar
 
Name: Harold
Trailer: 1975 Scamp, 13-foot
Redding, California
Posts: 310
There's a lot of good advice here. I would like to point out though, that in California at least, moving traffic has absolutely no obligation to let merging traffic into their lane, and there are times when speeding or slowing to allow someone in can create an unsafe condition.

It is the merging vehicle that has the entire responsibility to merge safely. I've known drivers that get angry when people don't open up a space to let them in, and I seen semis change lanes unsafely to let traffic merge. Fortunately they are the rare exception.

It's jaw-dropping when a guy driving a subcompact forces his way in front of an 80,000 pound tractor trailer. I've seen it. If the tractor trailer driver isn't skilled bad things can happen, including a chain reaction multi-car accident. Fortunately I've not seen THAT happen.

It's nice when a driver lets you merge in, but it should never be expected or demanded. It may work out, but it also may end in disaster.

Harold
__________________
You cannot have a proud and chivalrous spirit if your conduct is mean and paltry; for whatever a man's actions are, such must be his spirit. --Demosthenes
Doctor Harold is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2020, 10:37 PM   #27
Junior Member
 
Name: Rebecca
Trailer: Parkliner
Ohio
Posts: 10
My husband always did the towing, but a situation came up where I needed to learn to tow. After practicing backing up and down my long curvy driveway a few times I decided I was ready to tow my 15’ Parkliner from Ohio to Maine and back, alone.

I encountered many unforeseen towing and parking situations on that trip and conquered them all, more or less successfully. I carefully planned my routes, took my time driving and kept aware of my surroundings. I was often out of service range for my phone carrier so I made sure to download maps or plot my trip while I still had service. And I always carried paper maps just in case. When I traveled through cities I stayed in the truck lanes and kept my distance.

I camped in 6 different situations in 10 days, from a full hookup campground to a parking lot at a bar/seasonal camp to boondocking on my relatives’ remote properties. Each one had its challenges, especially for someone new to towing like myself.

I’m a small, recently retired woman, not especially strong, but very resourceful. I’m just saying that if I can do it, so can you.
DavenBecky is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-25-2020, 10:47 PM   #28
Senior Member
 
Civilguy's Avatar
 
Name: Mike
Trailer: Escape 21 & Jeep GC 5.7 (Previous 2012 Casita FD17 & 2010 Audi Q5)
Puget Sound, WA
Posts: 1,169
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Harold View Post
There's a lot of good advice here. I would like to point out though, that in California at least, moving traffic has absolutely no obligation to let merging traffic into their lane, and there are times when speeding or slowing to allow someone in can create an unsafe condition.

It is the merging vehicle that has the entire responsibility to merge safely. I've known drivers that get angry when people don't open up a space to let them in, and I seen semis change lanes unsafely to let traffic merge. Fortunately they are the rare exception.

It's jaw-dropping when a guy driving a subcompact forces his way in front of an 80,000 pound tractor trailer. I've seen it. If the tractor trailer driver isn't skilled bad things can happen, including a chain reaction multi-car accident. Fortunately I've not seen THAT happen.

It's nice when a driver lets you merge in, but it should never be expected or demanded. It may work out, but it also may end in disaster.

Harold
I hear what you are saying. You certainly can't judge how I approach this, so I applaud the cautionary notes.

And, yes, that is in fact what the good State states:
"California Driver Handbook - Vehicle Positioning
Space to Merge
Enter the freeway at or near the speed of traffic. Do not stop before merging into freeway traffic, unless it is absolutely necessary. Freeway traffic has the right-of-way."
I guess I've potentially got about 50 years of "going rogue" in the Bay Area to reflect on here. I'll admit that I adhere closely to the "do not stop" part. It's dangerous as can be to have someone merging into 70 mph traffic from a dead stop; I've seen it happen and it's not a pretty sight.

Fortunately, I also have a personal aversion to predicating disasters. So far we've all been good, every one of us weary travelers.

I like humanity. It's just people that I can't stand.
Attached Thumbnails
Peanuts.jpg  
__________________
~ "Discussions should be conducted without fondness for dispute or desire for victory." - Benjamin Franklin ~
Civilguy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2020, 07:14 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 8,651
Registry
I totally understand your point, Mike. Iíve driven in Bay Area traffic and more often in LA traffic. There is a world of difference between assertive driving and aggressive driving.

With or without a trailer, merging lanes in heavy traffic requires a certain level of assertiveness. Signal and start moving. There is a faction of a second before you reach the point of no return in which you can glance to see if the other driver is respecting your intentions and pull back if needed. Itís the aggressive drivers that will deliberately move to block you, and you can learn to recognize the signs and avoid them.

To reduce the need for right merges when towing I stay in the right lane on rural interstates and in the second-to-right lane on multi-lane urban freeways. Then if you do have to merge for a freeway split itís a left merge, which is easier.

I was 16 when I helped my mom tow our tent trailer to Florida in March of 1978. I cut my towing teeth in spring break traffic on I-95. It was a large tent trailer, and we had those terrible fender-mounted towing mirrors that vibrated continuously. At least the speed limit was 55 mph back then!
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-26-2020, 02:05 PM   #30
Senior Member
 
Radar1's Avatar
 
Name: Dave (and/or John)
Trailer: Scamp 16 SD std layout 6
Georgia
Posts: 973
Registry
We live on the outskirts of Atlanta so we have to drive through there often. We just try to avoid the busiest times (rush hour).

I also survived driving down Flatbush Ave in Brooklyn with our 16' Scamp during Friday afternoon rush hour (bad timing on my part), but we made it to our destination at Gateway National Park without too many scares. Would have been SO much easier if NY allowed small campers on their Parkways.
__________________
John-Dave and Marilyn
Sharpsburg, GA
04 Dodge Dakota V-8, 17 Dodge Durango V-6, 19 Ford Ranger 2.3 Ecoboost
radar1-scamping.blogspot.com
Radar1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2020, 03:51 PM   #31
Junior Member
 
Trailer: Casita 2004 Spirit Deluxe
Posts: 2
Towing concerns-Danny L

There is very good info in the responses below. I towed my 17foot Casita with a 2010 Mazda CX 9 with 3.7 V6. The first two things I did was put extended mirrors on factory mirrors and have trailer brake controls installed on the Mazda. It really improves your breaking distance and can really avoid trouble. The Casita already has electric brakes and it needs the hookup to the tow vehicle brakes so both brake at the same time and same force. Practice with whatever you choose, especially backing in empty parking lots. You will get the hang of it. Good traveling.
Don Barnes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 05:48 AM   #32
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 1,034
A couple of interesting websites related to traffic laws:

https://www.mit.edu/~jfc/right.html

And this:

Zipper Laws,

From: https://www.cars.com/articles/as-sta...1420688661722/

Even if you don’t recognize it by name, you’re still likely familiar with what traffic engineers refer to as “dynamic late merging.” Anyone who has inched along on the highway as it narrows to a single lane and watched a seemingly brazen driver zip to the front of the merging lane and sneak in has likely felt the sting of pride as their fundamental concept of civility is insulted.

But according to proponents of the zipper merge, you’re looking at it all wrong. In a heavily congested, slow-moving traffic situation (such as a work zone or accident site in which the roadway has been reduced to a single lane), instead of moving into the continuing lane as early as possible — which simply creates one even-longer line of even-slower-moving traffic — the zipper merge calls for motorists to fill both lanes up to the merge point, then take turns proceeding in the continuing lane. Cars falling in line one by one, like the teeth of a zipper, is how the maneuver got its name.

In Illinois at least:

From: https://forum.officer.com/forum/publ...f-way-in-merge

Specifically on a highway on-ramp, BOTH vehicles are required to adjust their speed to avoid a collision...

625 ILCS 5/11-905.
__________________
2019 Big Foot 25RQ with cargo box and onboard Cummins LP 2500 generator, 2019 Ram 2500 4x4, 6.7L Cummins
Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 08:52 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Name: JD
Trailer: Scamp 16 Modified (BIGLY)
Florida
Posts: 1,732
The Germans call it ReiŖverschlusssystem, which translates literally as the “zipper system” and even appears on street signs. A zipper is the ultimate accommodator, after all, each side alternating with an obliging “after you.” But as good a metaphor as it is, I’m not sure it works well in English.

https://youtu.be/lDushb_0CnM
redbarron55 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Yesterday, 10:10 AM   #34
Senior Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: BigFoot
Tennessee
Posts: 1,034
Re: Zipper most people have no idea of how it works, certainly have not internalized it and I suspect most people are not respectful and courteous enough for this to work well here in the US.

I mean I consider myself to be a decent enough person, but I have cut people off when they are merging unto the Interstate going 20 mph when the Interstate traffic is moving at 70 mph. I let the guy behind me deal with it.

My 25 year old son was dating a woman of the same age, college educated, and she would come to a FULL STOP when merging unto the Interstate, no matter how fast it was moving or how many people were behind her. She just could not get herself to match speed or even merge at a slow speed.

Also there is no driver's ed anymore, and even the Drivers test to get a license does not ask about the Zipper.
__________________

__________________
2019 Big Foot 25RQ with cargo box and onboard Cummins LP 2500 generator, 2019 Ram 2500 4x4, 6.7L Cummins
Rzrbrn is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 2 (0 members and 2 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Jetta towing issues.... caution Barrie Bochoff Towing, Hitching, Axles and Running Gear 60 09-29-2011 04:08 AM
Newbie Needs Opinions on a Possible Trailer Purchase UncleJosh Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 11 01-31-2006 08:31 AM
Possible Link Steve L. Forum Admin, News & Announcements 1 11-28-2005 09:22 AM
Window A/C Possible? Legacy Posts Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 23 07-02-2003 04:07 PM
Tow with Jeep Rubicon Possible/How? Legacy Posts Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 10 02-06-2003 02:57 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
×