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Old 02-20-2024, 08:05 AM   #1
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Tire pressure and temperature monitoring

What do you yes for tire pressure and temperature monitoring?
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Old 02-21-2024, 04:17 AM   #2
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What do you yes for tire pressure and temperature monitoring?
I think you meant use, not yes. I use a good quality tire pressure gauge when adding air to the tires. Once underway, I use a Tire Minder (TM) TPMS for monitoring pressure and temperature. I recently upgraded to the Tire Minder Smart because it will display all information on my F-150’s screen when ApplePlay is in use. I can see tire information and Google Maps at the touch of a finger as well as stream music from my phone at the same time.
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Old 02-21-2024, 05:44 AM   #3
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Thanks for the response.

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Old 02-21-2024, 10:48 AM   #4
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Since 2020 we’ve been using the Tymate TPMS that reads pressure and temperature for only $75.99 plus tax. I check it before every pull and it works great.

The Tymate TPMS is small, discrete, self-charging, no wires, and doesn’t need to be locked to the dash.

Our friends just spent $275 from Discount Tire for their TPMS and it does nothing more than our Tymate. Plus they have to plug it in for power, whereas the Tymate has a small solar panel on top and we’ve never had it go dead, since it sits on the dash like their $275 unit.

We have yet to replace batteries and it just keeps on working. For jollies I’ll probably be replacing the batteries this summer.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Food for thought,

Perry
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Old 02-21-2024, 11:37 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Perryb67 View Post
Since 2020 we’ve been using the Tymate TPMS that reads pressure and temperature for only $75.99 plus tax. I check it before every pull and it works great.

The Tymate TPMS is small, discrete, self-charging, no wires, and doesn’t need to be locked to the dash.

Our friends just spent $275 from Discount Tire for their TPMS and it does nothing more than our Tymate. Plus they have to plug it in for power, whereas the Tymate has a small solar panel on top and we’ve never had it go dead, since it sits on the dash like their $275 unit.

We have yet to replace batteries and it just keeps on working. For jollies I’ll probably be replacing the batteries this summer.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Food for thought,

Perry
I air down and back up a lot when going off-road. I've been leery of those cap type sensors that hold the schrader valve open all the time in the tire stems. Have you had any issues with them? Does it seem they could be removed a few times on every trip and still keep working? Do the sensors have batteries too?

Thanks.
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Old 02-21-2024, 05:51 PM   #6
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I air down and back up a lot when going off-road. I've been leery of those cap type sensors that hold the schrader valve open all the time in the tire stems. Have you had any issues with them? Does it seem they could be removed a few times on every trip and still keep working? Do the sensors have batteries too?

Thanks.
I have had no issues with the “cap type sensors,” but they really need to be used with metal, not rubber valve stems. You can remove them any time you want, but they are paired to the wheel during the set up process. Just make sure you put them back on the same wheel or they could report the driver’s side tire is losing air when in fact it is the passenger side tire that has a problem. Yes, the sensors have batteries, and they can be removed when not in use to conserve battery power.
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Old 02-21-2024, 09:16 PM   #7
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Thanks Carl.
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Old 02-21-2024, 10:32 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
I air down and back up a lot when going off-road. I've been leery of those cap type sensors that hold the schrader valve open all the time in the tire stems. Have you had any issues with them? Does it seem they could be removed a few times on every trip and still keep working? Do the sensors have batteries too?
We’re going on 60,000 with the campers down the road with the same set installed, first on our Escape 5.0 and now on our Bigfoot 25RQ with zero problems.

Don’t know why I would remove them “a few times on every trip”. The only times they’ve been removed is when we purchased new tires for the Escape, moved them to the Bigfoot, and replaced the one tire on the Bigfoot.

I do shut the system down and turn it back on at the beginning of every traveling day to make sure they’re actually working, but that should be done with every TPMS.

We didn’t have steel valve stems on the Escape, but put one steel stem on the wheel with the destroyed tire that was replaced when our axle bent on the 25RQ, and so far, so good. I’ve seen some older sensors that are monster size and can see why they have to have steel stems, but these are smaller and lighter.

The batteries in the sensors are still from when we purchased the Tymate TPMS in 2020.

When I put the sensors on the Bigfoot I found each sensor was within 1-2 psi of my expensive pressure gauge.

Food for thought,

Perry
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Old 02-22-2024, 06:46 AM   #9
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I've used a TST system for several years. The stem caps are a little fiddly, I certainly wouldn't want to r/r several times a trip. The instructions for initial set up were incomprehensible (to me) and I felt lucky to get it working. The display is hard to see in sunlight. TST was the only legit choice when I bought it but today, for the price, I'd probably try something like the Tymate. I think these gadgets are good to have when driving highway speeds, given the potential for trailer damage.
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Old 02-22-2024, 08:18 AM   #10
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I'm close to 72 years old, and you know what I have always done all my life? I didn't need a tire pressure monitor and all this newfangled crap. We looked at the tires, kicked them, and if they looked low, you shot some air into them. To check wheel hub temps, you touched the wheel hubs with the back of your hand. Does it get any simpler? Do we really need all this new "technology" to know that your tire needs air? Seriously? Get your butt out of the rig, do a "walk-around" and look at them...
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Old 02-22-2024, 09:27 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by Casita Greg View Post
I'm close to 72 years old, and you know what I have always done all my life? I didn't need a tire pressure monitor and all this newfangled crap. We looked at the tires, kicked them, and if they looked low, you shot some air into them. To check wheel hub temps, you touched the wheel hubs with the back of your hand. Does it get any simpler? Do we really need all this new "technology" to know that your tire needs air? Seriously? Get your butt out of the rig, do a "walk-around" and look at them...
Turning 75 shortly and have seen quite a bit. Used to be cars were shot at 100,000 miles, but today 300-500,000 miles is common. Rust killed our 2003 Honda Odyssey at 277,000 miles, mostly pulling our Scamp and Casita. One reason today's automobiles go further is because of the devices installed to prevent a catastrophic problem.

I've had tires explode on the highway because I picked up a nail on the highway AFTER I kicked the tires, yet the tires still lose air, get hot at low pressures, and explode. One flat destroyed the wheel well of our Scamp and required a lot of repairs to look new again. That's apparently never happened to you.

Last fall our friend's Airstream had an exploded tire that caused damage, and guess what? They now have a TPMS in their vehicle. When the tire exploded on our Casita in the middle of nowhere in Montana at 11 pm, the sway was horrific and I nearly flipped the Casita. TPMS probably would have given a warning. No additional damage, but the trailer could have flipped.

Most flats/explosions happen after you've kicked the tires, not before. Happened to us on this trip, but our truck warned us and the tire was down to 16 psi by the time we got to a tire shop a couple of miles down the road. The tire was getting hot, but we were lucky we weren't on a low use road in the middle of Montana with no services for miles.

There are a lot of safety devices on today's automobiles. Today's vehicles have TPMS installed at the factory for good reason. I don't want to go back to the way things used to be with vehicles and trailers, but if you want to that's your right.

Food for thought,

Perry
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Old 02-22-2024, 11:09 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by Casita Greg View Post
I'm close to 72 years old, and you know what I have always done all my life? I didn't need a tire pressure monitor and all this newfangled crap. We looked at the tires, kicked them, and if they looked low, you shot some air into them. To check wheel hub temps, you touched the wheel hubs with the back of your hand. Does it get any simpler? Do we really need all this new "technology" to know that your tire needs air? Seriously? Get your butt out of the rig, do a "walk-around" and look at them...
Pretty hard to check tires from the driver’s seat when towing at 60 mph. I was overjoyed when my TPMS warned me that one of the tires on my trailer had a slow leak before it was totally destroyed. BTW, ALL new vehicles sold in the USA are required by the USDOT to have TPMS protection. I’m close to 75 years old and having used several outhouses in my youth, I much prefer that newfangled crap known as an indoor flush toilet. Just sayin’.
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Old 02-22-2024, 12:55 PM   #13
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I appreciate the "Edit" feature when I realize I've posted something dumb.
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Old 02-22-2024, 01:49 PM   #14
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We’re going on 60,000 with the campers down the road with the same set installed, first on our Escape 5.0 and now on our Bigfoot 25RQ with zero problems.

Don’t know why I would remove them “a few times on every trip”. The only times they’ve been removed is when we purchased new tires for the Escape, moved them to the Bigfoot, and replaced the one tire on the Bigfoot.

I do shut the system down and turn it back on at the beginning of every traveling day to make sure they’re actually working, but that should be done with every TPMS.

We didn’t have steel valve stems on the Escape, but put one steel stem on the wheel with the destroyed tire that was replaced when our axle bent on the 25RQ, and so far, so good. I’ve seen some older sensors that are monster size and can see why they have to have steel stems, but these are smaller and lighter.

The batteries in the sensors are still from when we purchased the Tymate TPMS in 2020.

When I put the sensors on the Bigfoot I found each sensor was within 1-2 psi of my expensive pressure gauge.

Food for thought,

Perry
Thanks for the response.

My comment about removing them a couple times a day is because I air down and back up pretty often. I prefer to camp in the back country. But it sounds like that would not be a problem and be pretty much the same as removing a simple cap.
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Old 02-22-2024, 04:02 PM   #15
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It would be easy to remove the caps when you do your first air-down. Leave them off until you do your final air-up before hitting the pavement again. The low pressure alarm might be a consideration as well.
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Old 02-26-2024, 10:43 AM   #16
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What do you yes for tire pressure and temperature monitoring?



Just had to weigh in on this one. Going on 77 this June ...

While I totally agree with those who see camping getting to be more of a "newest technology" thing, I do agree with those who opt for things in the area of safety. Tire safety is paramount. Both in the TV and the RV. No other area of the outdoor experience needs as much caution.

But I do dismay to see the camping experience being about the gourmet meals on the road, large-screen TV, three-piece bath, and walk-around bed, etc., etc. I still long for the remote lake with the peace and quiet of the great outdoors. That's what it's all about for me.
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Old 02-26-2024, 12:10 PM   #17
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I've been using the TST sensors and monitor for about 10 or 12 years. I have sensors on all 8 tires since my vehicle's onboard monitor kept acting up. (I don't think the Tymate can handle 8 sensors, can it? But it's a bargain for 4 or 6 sensors.)

Just last week I'd set up at Boiling Springs SP in OK, then unhooked and drove to a trailhead. When I returned, the TST alarmed for a rear trailer tire. Upon investigation, the tire had picked up a nail. I pumped it back up to 50 psi, and by the next morning it was down to 3 psi; but because the front tire was holding the trailer up, that rear tire didn't look flat... it appeared just a bit soft. Without the alarm I might not have noticed and could have destroyed the tire by heading down the road that way. Instead I pumped it back up (with my ViAir 88P it only took about 5 minutes) to 50 psi and drove into town for a repair. Easy peasy.
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Old 03-04-2024, 04:54 PM   #18
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Feedback

This has been great feedback from many different perspectives. I appreciate everything.
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Old 03-05-2024, 11:55 AM   #19
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I say....do whatever makes you feel safe and happy. My 2019 Ram came with TPS.....first truck with that feature. I rarely look at it. No TPS on the Casita.....I ensure proper air pressure on the tires before leaving on a trip. At every fuel stop.....I put my hand over the hubs and feel for heat. I do the same thing when pulling our car trailer loaded with carriages...tractors etc.... This method has worked well for me for 40 yrs. With that said......I drive to enjoy the ride.....rarely do I exceed 62mph when towing on highways.....mostly backroads for us at 55mph or less. By the way.....70 yrs old is just getting started. Be safe out there.
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Old 03-05-2024, 12:52 PM   #20
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I say....do whatever makes you feel safe and happy. My 2019 Ram came with TPS.....first truck with that feature. I rarely look at it. No TPS on the Casita.....I ensure proper air pressure on the tires before leaving on a trip. At every fuel stop.....I put my hand over the hubs and feel for heat. I do the same thing when pulling our car trailer loaded with carriages...tractors etc.... This method has worked well for me for 40 yrs. With that said......I drive to enjoy the ride.....rarely do I exceed 62mph when towing on highways.....mostly backroads for us at 55mph or less. By the way.....70 yrs old is just getting started. Be safe out there.
My father smoked cigarettes all his life and never died of cancer.

You don't have to look at your TPMS for it to work. Let's say you:
"ensure proper air pressure on the tires before leaving on a trip. At every fuel stop.....I put my hand over the hubs and feel for heat. I do the same thing when pulling our car trailer loaded with carriages...tractors etc.... "
As happened with us three weeks ago, we picked up a screw after all those checks. Then without looking, our TPMS sent us a warning that our tire had low pressure. We were at mile 15 of a 200 miles drive when the warning happened. You're system would have provided no warning. Even with the best intentions, my guess is the tire would have exploded before we got even 50 miles down the road. There is a reason TPMS is on most, if not all, cars sold today.

I also have a cheap heat gun that works much better than my fingers.

Food for thought,

Perry
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