Tires for minivan - Fiberglass RV


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Old 12-03-2017, 02:14 PM   #1
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Name: Pamela
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Tires for minivan

I need to purchase two new tires for my Honda odyssey that will be pulling my Jayco Hummingbird when i retire in May. Suggestions for what tires i need?
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Old 12-03-2017, 03:05 PM   #2
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Pam, welcome to the forum. To answer your question, I looked at your van's tire size and then viewed tires available at tirerack.com . You probably want all-season treads. I have had good success with Firestone Destination LE2 tires; they are priced mid-range but they've had better than average reviews. But when I needed to buy new tires a month ago, I wanted to economize further (cash flow crunch) so I chose 4 Kumho Krugen tires from Tire Rack; with shipping and local mounting and balancing, I only paid about $550 after rebate. Of course, if you have money to burn, Michelins are considered very good also.

Most tire shops will recommend keeping all 4 tires the same (brand and model) for best handling characteristics. At the very least you want a similar tread type as the 2 tires you're keeping.

For lengthy traveling, it may be best to buy from a place with a nationwide (or at least regional) presence. Buying from tire rack, if I have a road hazard problem with a tire the place I stop at can contact tire rack for authorization to repair or replace under tire rack's road hazard coverage. Discount Tire is another good place to buy from, with a chain of stores around the country.

Have you checked your manual to see the weight your van is equipped to tow and to carry on the ball (hitch weight)? My guess is 3500 lbs tow capacity with 350 lbs on the hitch. Your greatest challenge might be keeping your hitch weight under 350. Not sure exactly which model number of Hummingbird you have, but they vary from about 270 lbs (16FD) to 375 lbs (17BH), and that's the DRY hitch weight before you add the battery, LP tank, water, and any gear you load. I strongly recommend weighing your trailer and weighing the trailer tongue when you have it set up the way you intend to have it for camping. Too much hitch weight will make steering and handling problematic, stress the rear suspension and hitch receiver attachment points, and worsen braking distance. (A weight-distributing hitch could alleviate the steering and braking issues, but the extra 65-90 lbs of such a device will put you way over 350 lbs for sure). You can weigh your trailer at truck CAT scales or on a gravel pit or refuse dump scale. For the hitch weight, a bathroom scale will do... but read up on the best way to do this using a cross-beam to halve the actual weight on the scale.
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Old 12-03-2017, 03:21 PM   #3
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Any good quality all-season tire will do. Brand preferences get contentious around here.

I'm a fan of Michelin Defenders, mainly for their quiet ride and long wear. We got almost 80K from the last set. Their weakness is wet braking. I have them on my current Pilot and had a similar Michelin product on our previous tug, a Toyota Sienna. I increase pressure 5 psi when towing (still well with the max rating of the tire).

Just an FYI... this particular forum is about molded (egg-type) fiberglass trailers. A Jayco Hummingbird is not molded. Unless you have the new 10RK model, the lightest of the full-size models is going to end up pretty close to the 3500# tow rating of your Odyssey once you add options and load it up for camping. Better not plan on extra people and cargo in the van. You may need a weight distributing hitch.
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Old 12-04-2017, 10:21 AM   #4
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Tip of the hat to you, Mike Magee for taking the time and effort to help. We Thank you.
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Old 12-04-2017, 10:31 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PamelaJM View Post
I need to purchase two new tires for my Honda odyssey that will be pulling my Jayco Hummingbird when i retire in May. Suggestions for what tires i need?
What are the other two?
If they are acceptable...Match them.
You don't say the year or trim level of your Honda.
Why two? Is it budget or two really good tires?
My advice is to visit your local Discount Tire dealer or equivalent, to be advised of your options.
Ask what the OEM tire was.
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Old 12-04-2017, 10:38 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Any good quality all-season tire will do. Brand preferences get contentious around here.

I'm a fan of Michelin Defenders, mainly for their quiet ride and long wear. We got almost 80K from the last set. Their weakness is wet braking. I have them on my current Pilot and had a similar Michelin product on our previous tug, a Toyota Sienna. I increase pressure 5 psi when towing (still well with the max rating of the tire).

Just an FYI... this particular forum is about molded (egg-type) fiberglass trailers. A Jayco Hummingbird is not molded. Unless you have the new 10RK model, the lightest of the full-size models is going to end up pretty close to the 3500# tow rating of your Odyssey once you add options and load it up for camping. Better not plan on extra people and cargo in the van. You may need a weight distributing hitch.
My second oldest daughter has a Honda Odyssey ( Not my choice)
, a small pop up trailer , 4 kids & a husband and a 75 lb dog.
When hooked up for travel , the rear bumper of their vehicle is just about touching the ground and the headlights are aimed so they can spot incoming planes. As the kids got older the problem got progressively worse .
My eldest daughter also has 4 kids and owns a Nissan Quest
( Again not my choice) and they have the same issue .
Their hitch is constantly scrapping the ground .
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:00 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by steve dunham View Post
My second oldest daughter has a Honda Odyssey ( Not my choice)
, a small pop up trailer , 4 kids & a husband and a 75 lb dog.
When hooked up for travel , the rear bumper of their vehicle is just about touching the ground and the headlights are aimed so they can spot incoming planes. As the kids got older the problem got progressively worse .
My eldest daughter also has 4 kids and owns a Nissan Quest
( Again not my choice) and they have the same issue .
Their hitch is constantly scrapping the ground .
But what about the tires?
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:06 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by floyd View Post
...Ask what the OEM tire was.
I'm curious why you would ask that, Floyd. I've always been anxious to get rid of OEM tires and move to something better. I usually haven't had to wait long either- 30K tops.
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:19 AM   #9
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tires

I'm not a tire guy but!
Tire ply ratings are related back in the days when we used cotton in our tires.
A passenger car may have had a 4 ply tread and 2 ply sidewall. Trucks maybe 10 ply 6 ply sidewall. Tire ply ratings are rated to equivalent of cotton ply tires.
Make sure most importantly that the sidewalls are rated for the load. A 103 rating should work but check it out.
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:42 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by gordon2 View Post
But what about the tires?
The tires are overloaded just like the vehicles are overloaded.
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Old 12-04-2017, 12:19 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
I'm curious why you would ask that, Floyd. I've always been anxious to get rid of OEM tires and move to something better. I usually haven't had to wait long either- 30K tops.
Its always a place to start. Need to know wheel size, tire size, load rating, etc.
You really can't know if you have moved to something better if you don't know what you started with.
While I generally agree with your position, improvement may not always be needed.(just most of the time)
My new TC came with a great tire from a source which I usually would not even consider.
Many driver's simply knee jerk on price or rated tread life, so I would say be sure that you get something at least as good as OEM. which requires knowing what it was.
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Old 12-04-2017, 01:46 PM   #12
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While looking at the specs for the stock tires, look at the "load rating". For heavier than standard use, as in this case, get the next heavier load rating. If your vehicle came with "Standard Load" get "C" instead. If it came with C, get D instead. A stiffer rear tire will have more stability while towing a heavy trailer.

Forget the "Ply Rating" nonsense and get the Load Rating you wish. Such as D or E or C, etc. Ply rating and the dealer's likely use of the term "Ply" instead of ply "rating" is misleading. Most all passenger and light truck tires have the same, or approximately the same, design. A tire that says "10 Ply Rating" is really only a two ply sidewall and a five ply tread, same as one that says "6 Ply Rating" (read and compare the sentence about this that is molded into every tire). Some tires are heavier duty because the plies are stronger, not because there are more of them.

It's better to buy four instead of two and then rotate them as needed. This makes them wear longer, have more traction and be quieter. If you will only be towing on the highway in perfect weather, a highway tread will be fine, but if you might be on dirt roads or you go in winter, an AT might be a better choice.

My personal bias and my personal experience (YMMV) is to absolutely avoid BFG tires. There are a lot of threads about them on other sites that back up what I say. I've had a number of sets of Toyo tires and have had excellent results. Long life, stay balanced, quiet, good traction.
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:01 PM   #13
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Most cars these days have the tire sizes printed right on the sticker in the drivers side door jamb. Don't let the tire shop change tire sizes just because they have a different tire size in stock. For long term wear I personally buy michelin tires. They are expensive though. Another thing to check is the owners manual and see if they recomend a different tire when loaded down or towing. Getting the wrong tire can effect your mileage and sometimes bargain tires are no bargain.
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:24 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by stevebaz View Post
Most cars these days have the tire sizes printed right on the sticker in the drivers side door jamb. Don't let the tire shop change tire sizes just because they have a different tire size in stock. For long term wear I personally buy michelin tires. They are expensive though. Another thing to check is the owners manual and see if they recomend a different tire when loaded down or towing. Getting the wrong tire can effect your mileage and sometimes bargain tires are no bargain.
Actually there are almost always at least two (often three) wheel sizes depending on trim level. and several tire sizes and profiles, and that is just OEM.
Most normal vehicles can be markedly improved by changing wheel and tire sizes one over or two over. Also by upgrading tread design and compound.
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Old 12-05-2017, 10:00 AM   #15
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tires

One thing I found at out Sams that I never knew before is Goodyear tires are for ride some of the others are for wear and if they wear better to me they must be stronger.

the tire guy showed my how by just setting the tire up right and pushing down you can tell a lot by the strength of the tire by doing this simple test. I tried it I don't buy Goodyear anymore and I have been a lifelong believer in Goodyear tires but after premature treat wear on several sets and developing holes I quit them.

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Old 12-05-2017, 10:26 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by k0wtz View Post
One thing I found at out Sams that I never knew before is Goodyear tires are for ride some of the others are for wear and if they wear better to me they must be stronger.

the tire guy showed my how by just setting the tire up right and pushing down you can tell a lot by the strength of the tire by doing this simple test. I tried it I don't buy Goodyear anymore and I have been a lifelong believer in Goodyear tires but after premature treat wear on several sets and developing holes I quit them.

bob
You're better off looking at the Load Rating than standing the tire up and pushing on it.

Tread wear is not an indication of tire strength. It is more a function of air pressure, tread design, use and rubber compound. Besides, if you based the tire strength on tread wear, you wouldn't know if it was strong or not until it was worn out.

Most tires are the same two ply sidewall design. Stronger plies make stronger tires. Sidewall plies are typically polyester.

Here is an informative link:

https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiret...e.jsp?techid=9
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Old 12-05-2017, 11:33 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by stevebaz View Post
Most cars these days have the tire sizes printed right on the sticker in the drivers side door jamb. Don't let the tire shop change tire sizes just because they have a different tire size in stock. For long term wear I personally buy michelin tires. They are expensive though. Another thing to check is the owners manual and see if they recomend a different tire when loaded down or towing. Getting the wrong tire can effect your mileage and sometimes bargain tires are no bargain.
My experience with Michelin tires ( Personnal and Commercial fleet use) is the exact opposite of yours. We got better tread life out of Tires Plus house brand then we did with Michelins and they were around 60% of the cost.
It's a possibility that climate was a factor.
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Old 12-05-2017, 12:43 PM   #18
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We got better tread life out of Tires Plus house brand then we did with Michelins and they were around 60% of the cost.
It's a possibility that climate was a factor.
There may be some validity to that. Down here, the Michelins do very well and last a long time. My Dad lives in a much colder climate and hasn't had the same longevity with Michelins. Maybe something to do with the compound. He uses Firestone tires.
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Old 12-05-2017, 12:56 PM   #19
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steve I have never had any Michelins hold up! ever!!


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Old 12-05-2017, 12:58 PM   #20
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yep exaggeration at work. everyone entitled to their own opinions I am for one going with the sams salemens advice. I like perrillies!!


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