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Old 08-01-2022, 07:20 AM   #21
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Name: John
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Originally Posted by Steve Hague View Post
Still newbies at this, but we towed our Trillium 4500 to the Northern Indiana Vintage Trailer Rally last week. We camped on a 30 amp site again. I called ahead to make certain that it was OK to charge our Tesla Model Y Long Range at the campsite and they replied that we could. They even looked up our reservation to make certain that it was a 30 amp site.
We left home charged at 100%, drove 76 miles mostly on 2-lane highways at 55-65 mph, and arrived at the campsite with 57% battery capacity remaining (427 Wh/mile).
We were the only fiberglass trailer in attendance, so we were a bit of a curiosity, though I was surprised that several were familiar with Trilliums and fiberglass rvs in general. There were two 1970's fiberglass motor homes (FMC for one). Must have been huge molds they came out of. Of course, we were asked many questions about EV towing as many of the small vintage stickies were of similar size and weight. I shared what little I know at this time and had several interesting and hopeful discussions on the future of rv travel.
On the first day of charging at the TT-30 post I again experienced a reduction from 24 amp to 12 amp charging. I stopped charging and applied dielectric grease to the plug and recepticle and was able to charge at 24 amp. I'm not sure whether the dielectric grease did the trick, but it didn't hurt.
I intentionally only charged to 90% on the morning we departed. We took a different, but similar route home, travelling 85 miles using 443 Wh/mile and arrived home with 38% charge remaining.
We have some longer trips planned this fall that will require charging along the way. Those should be more interesting. I appreciate hearing from the more experienced and adventurous.
Steve
Great report Steve. Thanks.
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Old 08-04-2022, 12:42 PM   #22
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Happened to see a Facebook post this morning about a Tesla (model Y? regular or long range?) towing a 13' Scamp. Wish I could find it again to post a link, but no sauce. The thing that caught my attention was the challenge of crossing Montana. They ended up making an extra overnight campground charging stop because the towing range did not make it between superchargers in that thinly populated state.
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Old 08-04-2022, 01:01 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Jon in AZ View Post
Happened to see a Facebook post this morning about a Tesla (model Y? regular or long range?) towing a 13' Scamp. Wish I could find it again to post a link, but no sauce. The thing that caught my attention was the challenge of crossing Montana. They ended up making an extra overnight campground charging stop because the towing range did not make it between superchargers in that thinly populated state.
Could be. Iím sure that kinda thing will happen less as the infrastructure gets built out. We went across Canada this year with no difficulty but Iím sure it happens.
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Old 08-04-2022, 01:55 PM   #24
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Could be. Iím sure that kinda thing will happen less as the infrastructure gets built out.
Except that more and more EVs are also being purchased.
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Old 08-04-2022, 02:06 PM   #25
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Except that more and more EVs are also being purchased.
True. Time will tell. But from personal experience it hasnít been a problem yet. And we travel a lot.

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Old 08-04-2022, 04:04 PM   #26
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We are planning a trip to Big Bend National Park in Texas next January/February. We could easily get to the entrance of the park towing our Trillium 4500 with our 2022 Tesla Model Y Long Range, but it would be dicey inside the park since it is so large and the more desirable campgrounds do not have electric hookups. At this point we are planning to use our 2015 Odyssey for towing, but will watch for improvement to the charging infrastructure as the Model Y provides a better towing experience in my opinion.
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Old 08-13-2022, 07:28 PM   #27
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This guy pulled a casita across the country. I think it is 3 or 4 parts. At one point, he had to leave the Casita on the side of the road to reach the next charging station. Like anything else everything is a learning curve.
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Old 08-13-2022, 08:13 PM   #28
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His results are similar to ours. It was funny to see him turning off the park lights thinking it would save power. Rookie mistake. It’s a learning curve. Nice little combo he has.
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Old 09-20-2022, 12:25 PM   #29
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Third EV camping trip

We towed our Trillium 4500 to the Algonac Glassic Rally with our 2022 Tesla Model Y Long Range. We left our house with 100% charge, but knew we would need to make at least one charging stop since it is 210 miles to Algonac State Park and our expected towing range is around 150 miles.
We charged twice. The first stop did not have a pull in charging site, so it took an additional 10 minutes to unhook and hook back up. Even so, we were back on the road in about thirty minutes including a visit to the bathroom in the Meijer store.
The second charging stop was not really necessary, but I wanted to arrive at the campsite with extra charge in the battery in case there was a problem with charging at the campsite. This charging site (Roseville) was great. We were able to use a pull in charging site and were in and out in less than 10 minutes.
We used 95 kWh to tow the 210 miles, averaging 451 Wh/mile. We were travelling with the slower traffic, 60 to 65 mph.
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Old 09-20-2022, 01:03 PM   #30
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home from Algonac

We had a great time at the Algonac Glassic. There were so many fiberglass rvs, many I had never seen in real life.
Charging at the campsite turned out to be a breeze. I was prepared to use a TT-30 outlet which would have required overnight charging, but we had a 50 amp site that only took a couple hours to give enough charge for our stay. I did stay hooked up our last night to allow off-peak charging, but set it to 90% since I knew that would be enough to get us more than halfway home.
We just charged once on the homeward trip. Again, this Supercharger site did not have a pull-in site, so we had to unhitch again. This site was also very busy, the first time I've seen a completely full charging site. In the few minutes it took to unhook, a site opened up. By the time I got back from the Meijer bathroom and had my late lunch, we were charged sufficiently to get home.
We used 102 kWh on the trip home, averaging 471 kWh/mile. This was a little less efficient than our first leg, but there may have been a slight headwind and I may have sped up as we neared home.
I think that I'm gaining more confidence with each trip, but know that there is still much to learn, especially as we begin to experience colder weather conditions. I really look forward to new charging station installations, better designed for ev towing.
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Old 09-20-2022, 01:15 PM   #31
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Excellent report, thanks!
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Old 09-20-2022, 01:17 PM   #32
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Thanks for the report Steve. We are currently touring Vancouver island with our EV RV combo. There are only a couple superchargers on the island so we have been using our CCS adapter. Most of our charging has been in campgrounds other than a couple stops at BC hydro CCS/Chademo sites. Headed back to the mainland in a few days on the Powell river crossing. Then we’ll take the Sunshine Coast back to horse shoe bay and then the sea to sky highway back to the BC interior. Should be fun.

Stay safe on the road Steve.
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Old 09-22-2022, 04:40 AM   #33
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CCS Combo 1 Adapter

John,
Are you using your CCS Adapter to charge your Tesla at CCS DC fast chargers? If so, I am interested in your experiences. One potential advantage I see is that CCS sites would allow pull-through charging, hence not having to unhitch the trailer.
Tesla Supercharging locations have been adequate for our towing needs so far, but as we venture westward from the Midwest, the purchase of a $250 CCS Combo 1 Adapter may be necessary (at least for peace of mind).
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Old 09-22-2022, 07:21 AM   #34
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We definitely use our CCS adapter and for various reasons. Sometimes it’s access with the trailer and sometimes location. Right now we are up island on Vancouver island and there is simply no superchargers. Our preference is usually superchargers but the adapter is cheap and the convenience is huge.

This is a FLO site in Castelgar. Easy access. 100 kw. Easy Peasy.

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Old 10-08-2022, 06:40 PM   #35
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forth EV towing trip

Just a short 40 mile trip to Pokagon State park, we only decided to camp there the night before. Since it was such a short trip, I only charged our Model Y Long Range to 80%. I also drove at or above the 70 MPH speed limit, which I rarely do when towing with our Honda Odyssey, as this would cause a severe mileage penalty. We arrived with about 53% charge remaining having used 502 Wh/mile. Our campsite had a 50A power post, so we were easily recharged to 80% overnight. As a courtesy, I informed the campground check-in that I intended to charge my vehicle at the campsite and was told that they had never had that brought up before, but they could not see why not.
The trip home was uneventful and if anything I drove at a faster clip. In spite of this, we used only 458 Wh/mile.
I noticed a low tire pressure warning of 34 psi in one of our tires, so I pumped all four up to 45 psi when we got home.
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Old 10-08-2022, 07:04 PM   #36
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Great report Steve. I don’t trust my driving skills to drive that fast but I know my limitations so I’ll be the slow poke in the right lane. .

We just finished a 2212 kilometre trip thru BC including Vancouver island, the sunshine coast and sea to sky highway. Great trip. 21 days on the road. Here are a few pics.



Ram into our twin at a charge station there.



One of the provincial parks on our journey.



Here is our stats.



Cheers.
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Old 10-09-2022, 05:30 AM   #37
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John,
I converted Wh/km to Wh/mile, and it sounds like you are getting great efficiency, especially since you are towing a larger trailer and experiencing much greater elevation change. I wonder how much the aerodynamics of your T@B helps achieve this result. We are heading 200 miles south next week, so we will likely be found in the slow lane for much of that trip, but I was surprised how solid our tow was at speed on this last short trip.
We also followed your lead and purchased the Tesla CCS adapter. We haven't had a chance to use it yet, but having it in the frunk gives us an added measure of comfort as we venture further from home.
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Old 10-09-2022, 05:37 AM   #38
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As cute as we think of our Trillium 4500, probably not very aerodynamic. Understandable, as the national speed limit was 55 mph when she was built.
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Old 10-09-2022, 07:36 AM   #39
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Hi Steve. Keep in mind we are travelling at max 90 kph, and in the BC mountains sometimes less than that as speed limits are sometimes even slower. I’m sure that has a lot to do with the efficiency.

We recently travelled the Duffy lake road (highway 99) from pemberton to Lillooet. A stretch of 101 kilometres famous for hot brakes and overheated engines. Lots of 13 percent grades and switchbacks. With the regen we never had to touch our brakes but we could smell the brakes of the combo in front of us. Anyway, we left pemberton with 89 percent and arrived at the BC hydro charger in Lillooet at 50 percent. Here’s the graph. Can you tell where the 13 percent grade started? .

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Old 10-09-2022, 08:19 AM   #40
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An encouraging report for those who are considering towing with an electric vehicle as I see it. Iím sure that much of this practice is in the pioneering stage but the world is going to change and many will have to change with it. Thanks for all of the information
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