TV for Scamp16' Plan 4 recommendations, pls - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-04-2017, 07:32 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: In the market
California
Posts: 4
TV for Scamp16' Plan 4 recommendations, pls

Hello: I will be purchasing a Scamp 16', plan 4 trailer very soon. Coincidentally, my Honda Odyssey just blew it's transmission and I will now need a new TV. My original intent was to buy a truck camper so I could get to a little bit more out of the way places and not always have to stay in campgrounds. I was not ever planning on 'rock crawling', and now after finally deciding on the Scamp I am wondering how limited will I be as far as "getting away from it all"? Also would love to get a hybrid TV (poss Toyota Highlander w/ V6), but it seems to only be AWD. I'm wondering if I should definitely get a 4 WD vehicle, or would AWD cover it, and I will stick to a vehicle with a minimum of 3500 pound towing capacity. I'd love your opinions on what would be great choices for the type of camping I have decided I'd like to do: a little off the beaten path camping mixed with campground/RV park camping to just take a break from the road for little bits (do laundry, hang out by a pool, use utility hook-ups, etc.) I'm hoping to tour the Pacific NW first (I live in CA), and then venture out across the US. My TV would also be my daily driver and I may need to accommodate 4 - 5 other folks from time to time when not towing. Thanks in advance for your time, I have been widely reading this forum and hope to meet up with some of you sometime soon!
Thrifty Lisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 06:55 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 10,394
Registry
Welcome, Lisa!

Up to six passengers, daily driver, tow rated for at least 3500 pounds, and decent ground clearance for back road use sounds like a three-row crossover SUV. They aren't meant for rock crawling but do well on forest service roads and primitive campgrounds. They'll go pretty much anywhere you can reasonably pull your Scamp. I would definitely want AWD for better traction on loose dirt or gravel.

Almost every manufacturer offers at least one, so you have plenty of choices. A Highlander is a popular and reliable choice, with or without the hybrid drivetrain (as far as I know, it's the only three-row hybrid). We have a Pilot. Explorer, Pathfinder, Traverse, Acadia, Enclave, Sorento, Santa Fe, Durango, CX-9, Q7, ML350, the new VW Atlas,... Take your pick.

If you want a bit more off-road capability, you could go to a truck-based SUV like the Sequoia or Expedition, but you take a hit in fuel economy for daily driving. Some crew cab pick-ups will still carry six as well.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 08:14 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B
British Columbia
Posts: 7,882
If you get a Durango, make sure it doesn't have that 'spoiler' hanging down under the front 'bumper'. We have a rental Durango currently and an insurance claim after leaving it behind on a provincial park road.
__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 10:31 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Trailer: Scamp 16 ft Side Dinette
Posts: 1,214
The Highlander is highly recommended. We have a 2013, non hybrid. previously had a 2007 Hybrid. They handled the 16 DLX Scamp with ease. Look for a used one equipped with receiver hitch, to avoid the "new" price.
Wayne Collins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 10:56 AM   #5
Member
 
Name: Henry
Trailer: Scamp 2017 16-ft SD / FB
Texas
Posts: 86
TV for Scamp 16-ft

My everyday and TV is a Nissan Frontier V6 2W with factory tow package. Can hold 4 +drive ok and has clearance for many Forest Service fire roads. It come as a 4W drive also. Have over 55,000 miles towing in all types of weather with no problem.
__________________
Henry
Houston TX
Scamp 2017 16ft FB/SD
Gattopuin64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 11:07 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 10,394
Registry
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Collins View Post
...Look for a used one equipped with receiver hitch, to avoid the "new" price.
That raises a point. Some models require a certain engine, drivetrain, and/or optional tow package to earn the maximum factory tow rating. It varies a lot from manufacturer to manufacturer, and many dealer salespeople are not up to speed on the towing requirements of the vehicles they sell. The presence of a hitch does not always mean it has required mechanical towing upgrades- some people install a hitch just to carry a bike rack.

In addition to any other research you do, I'd recommend you google, download, and read the towing section of the owner's manual for the model and year you are looking to purchase before you sign on the dotted line. Make sure the vehicle you're purchasing has all required towing upgrades. Many things can be added aftermarket- hitch and wiring, brake controller, ATF cooler, for example- but some things must be installed from the factory.

If you buy used, you may not be able to tell by looking whether it has all the towing upgrades. You can ask a dealer to run the VIN to get the factory build specifications.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-05-2017, 01:46 PM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: Sprinter 'til I buy
Denver, CO
Posts: 944
You are getting good advice. No personal experience, but many rave about the relatively good mileage they get with Ford's Ecoboost package. There are also several small diesels, such as in the Chevy Colorado or its GM twin. I have had great luck with Sprinter's small diesel. All of those mentioned incorporate turbos. Do your homework.
Tom 72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2017, 10:23 AM   #8
Junior Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: In the market
California
Posts: 4
Thanks from Thrifty Lisa

Thank you all for your information. I knew I'd get good advice here! I am aware of the factory installed tow package advantages, and am a little spooked about Hondas as my 2002 Odyssey, with less than 135K miles on it, blew the transmission due to some type of heating tube that ran top side of the transmission? In any case, I now know that heat and transmissions do not mix, and see some of those tow packages include cooling apparati (is that plural for apparatus?). So, thx for all your info about ground clearance and doing my homework, and it sure was nice to get a 'study guide' from you all. Take care! Lisa
Thrifty Lisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2017, 10:32 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 10,394
Registry
Early Honda Odysseys had known transmission issues. Around 2005 Honda swapped the trouble-prone (Accord-derived?) transmission for a heavy-duty unit designed for the Pilot/Ridgeline. Problems went way down after that.

Honda now has two new transmissions in the Odyssey/Pilot/Ridgeline and the tow package includes a large auxiliary transmission cooler. I doubt you would have the same problem again, but I wouldn't fault you for looking a different direction this time around.

Consumer Reports' repair data (especially the charts that break it down by vehicle system) provides useful information, but they often miss new, developing issues. For that it's helpful to visit an owner's forum for a specific vehicle you're interested in.

So much homework...
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2017, 01:21 PM   #10
Senior Member
 
Trailer: Scamp 16 ft Side Dinette
Posts: 1,214
Transmission (Torque Converter - TC) overheating is caused by excessive slippage in the TC. And that is usually from pushing too hard on the gas pedal in too high a gear. Learn to downshift on the uphill grades, slow down if necessary.
A transmission cooler helps, but it is a crutch.
Wayne Collins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2017, 03:17 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
Glenn Baglo's Avatar
 
Name: Glenn
Trailer: 2009 Escape 17B
British Columbia
Posts: 7,882
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Collins View Post
A transmission cooler helps, but it is a crutch.
Sometimes you need a crutch, especially if it keeps you from breaking your other leg.
__________________
What happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?
- Bertolt Brecht
Glenn Baglo is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2017, 03:41 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 10,394
Registry
Crutch or otherwise, if the doctor (or in this case, the vehicle manufacturer) says you need one, it's good to listen.

It's also good to listen to what the manufacturer says about how to use the transmission properly when towing.

Not either/or but both/and.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2017, 06:03 PM   #13
Junior Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: In the market
California
Posts: 4
And ...

And so thanks again everyone who has helped out. Since you're all so savvy, anyone have some good 'rules of thumb' so I can make good decisions about which back roads would be safe to take? Of course there's experience, but I'd rather not break the trailer learning the hard way! Cheers all - it's 5:00pm here!!
Thrifty Lisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2017, 12:25 PM   #14
Senior Member
 
Name: Tom
Trailer: Sprinter 'til I buy
Denver, CO
Posts: 944
I would feel comfortable towing down county maintained roads, slower if they are gravel or dirt. When I reach unimproved or non-maintained forest service roads, I would seek a place to leave the trailer as my "base camp".

As far as back roads, as opposed to say interstate highways, which was not your question. I think a leisurely drive along secondary highways would be half the fun. Avoid rush hour.
Tom 72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2017, 12:51 PM   #15
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 10,394
Registry
Regarding National Forest roads, you can check with the local ranger district. They vary a lot. In my neck of the woods they're generally fine for RVs and well used.

The biggest thing you want to avoid is getting into a dead end situation and no place to turn a trailer.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2017, 01:53 PM   #16
Junior Member
 
Name: Lisa
Trailer: In the market
California
Posts: 4
Ok then. So it sounds like I don't really need to consider a pickup truck then, either. I won't be going places requiring 4wd and it seems to be that I won't need a larger vehicle than something like a Toyota Highlander AWD either. I'll just do some math to double check. Thx, Tom
Thrifty Lisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
eco, scamp


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Washroon Size Scamp16 Deluxe Side Washroom vs Escape 17B Briantb General Chat 2 09-21-2012 09:17 PM
PLS help with installation with roof top AC for 13' scamp! jwannacamper Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 23 08-22-2012 07:13 PM
pls help with small ac unit for 13' scamp?! jwannacamper Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 3 08-14-2012 07:14 AM
It's time for an intro and our story. Pls pardon our delay.... Mikell Hi, I am.... 9 05-02-2012 07:53 AM
Captain (mold) need advice for wall covering and floor pls Elizabeth.G. Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 1 05-19-2009 03:05 PM

» Trailer Showcase

Cadet

MrLennon

Louise

Davo
» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.