Best winter camper - Fiberglass RV
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Old 08-09-2022, 12:29 AM   #1
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Best winter camper

Hi guys, I'm new to travel trailers, I've done all my camping in tents thus far. I am skier and would like to be able to Boondock in the parking lot overnight to hit the slopes in the morning. I live near Boston so the mountains are 3 hours away so being able to make the trip up on a Friday and spend the weekend would be great. Also if I get a camper then obviously I'd use it in the summer over the tent. Im not really interested in going to trailer parks, more interested in boondocking and national forests. My TV will be a Tundra 5.7. Its just me and my two dogs. From what I can tell the best option for that would be an Oliver, or maybe a Bigfoot? Do any of the other fiberglass trailers come ready to go camping below freezing?
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Old 08-09-2022, 05:52 AM   #2
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Those two about cover it for fiberglass. You may need a more capable tow vehicle, depending on which model you choose.
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Old 08-09-2022, 06:26 AM   #3
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We have stayed warmer and had far less condensation winter camping in our Bigfoot than we experienced in our Oliver. But for real winter camping, check out the Imperial Outdoors RX22! A fish house on wheels….
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Old 08-09-2022, 05:45 PM   #4
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Those two about cover it for fiberglass. You may need a more capable tow vehicle, depending on which model you choose.
I'd just be going with the single axle models, although the tow rating for my truck is 8600lb so id assume either Oliver would be fine, 5000gvwr vs 7000gvwr? Definitely the smaller would be better and all I'm really looking for, cheaper to tow, heat, initial cost and its only me and two dogs.
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We have stayed warmer and had far less condensation winter camping in our Bigfoot than we experienced in our Oliver. But for real winter camping, check out the Imperial Outdoors RX22! A fish house on wheels….
Really? Thats awesome to hear, I had read that the Oliver was a bit better since it didnt have a wood floor like a the bigfoot but that was just a post on a forum. I'll go check out that RX22! Thank you.
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Old 08-09-2022, 07:56 PM   #5
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I pull a 2021 Bigfoot 25b25rt with a 2016 5.7l Tundra and use a 1200lbs equalizer sway. The only modification to the truck is an upgraded P3 teconsha brake controller, tows just fine. However our former Escape was much easier to tow.
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Old 08-10-2022, 07:54 PM   #6
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While on the topic, are there any non fiberglass trailers that are 4 season ready?
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Old 08-10-2022, 11:14 PM   #7
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I'd just be going with the single axle models, although the tow rating for my truck is 8600lb so id assume either Oliver would be fine, 5000gvwr vs 7000gvwr?
Your truck would not be a good choice for an Elite II. For a good towing experience, you need a bigger truck. Towing capacity is not the most important number in a truck’s list of specs. Pay close attention to the cargo carrying capacity. The larger Oliver and all your associated camping stuff will quickly consume a smaller (1/2 ton) truck’s CCC.
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Old 08-11-2022, 12:41 AM   #8
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Your truck would not be a good choice for an Elite II. For a good towing experience, you need a bigger truck. Towing capacity is not the most important number in a truck’s list of specs. Pay close attention to the cargo carrying capacity. The larger Oliver and all your associated camping stuff will quickly consume a smaller (1/2 ton) truck’s CCC.
I'm absolutely not here to debate towing weights at all, considering i regularly tell people on the Tundra pages that are towing 30ft 8000lb dry trailers that are clearly towing above what they should. That said the Elite II is only 4600lbs dry and would be well within the trucks limits. I towed a 5000lb boat and it wasn't even close to an issue. None of this really matters though since Im looking to get the single axle trailer. If I were going to be a larger truck, I'd be getting a slide in bigfoot instead.

Does anyone have any experience in comparing something like the Artic Fox 22, to say an Oliver or a Bigfoot?
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Old 08-11-2022, 12:46 AM   #9
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We have stayed warmer and had far less condensation winter camping in our Bigfoot than we experienced in our Oliver. But for real winter camping, check out the Imperial Outdoors RX22! A fish house on wheels….
I think maybe you mean the Imperial Xplore X22. It is rated for down to 40 below, although I doubt it could really work in that temp unless fully winterized.

It is made by a company that also makes fish houses in Wisconsin, but is a very nice trailer with independent, hydraulically adjustable suspension, large lithium battery bank, solar and large compressor fridge. It uses far less propane for heating because of the extreme insulation, and none is used for the fridge since it is a compressor model.

I had an Oliver Elite 2 for a couple of years and its insulation value was nothing compared to the Xplore. The Oliver has essentially, a layer of bubble wrap between the hulls, which is OK, but not for extreme cold. The Xplore has 2" of styrofoam in the walls and ceiling, plus batt style insulation in the ceiling, over the foam, for about 6" total. The floor is a core construction material that is waterproof. All piping is inside the perimeter walls and above the floor. The tanks are heated from the ducted heater and heating pads. It is a great trailer for cold weather.

It has ducted heat, thick insulation, Crane Noble fiberglass walls over a welded aluminum skeleton, a no-wood floor designed for commuter trains, and no black tank. It can be completely off-grid and pulled over rough roads to the back country with its adjustable ride height and no pipes underneath.

It weighs about 5,350 lbs dry, or about 6,000-6200 lbs ready to camp, and could be pulled well by a Tundra.
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Old 08-11-2022, 12:48 AM   #10
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I think maybe you mean the Imperial Xplore X22. It is rated for down to 40 below, although I doubt it could really work in that temp unless fully winterized.

It is made by a company that also makes fish houses in wisconsin, but is a very nice trailer with independent, hydraulically adjustable suspension, large lithium battery bank, solar and large compressor fridge. It uses far less propane for heating because of the extreme insulation.

The X22 is a great trailer for cold weather because of its ducted heat, insulation, Crane Noble fiberglass walls over a welded aluminum skeleton, a no-wood floor designed for commuter trains, and no black tank. It can be completely off-grid and pulled over rough roads to the back country. Good ground clearance and no pipes underneath.
Yeah I figured out the model he meant once I started researching it. Absolutely awesome trailer but way more than my needs for some weekend ski trips lol.
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Old 08-11-2022, 12:16 PM   #11
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Yeah I figured out the model he meant once I started researching it. Absolutely awesome trailer but way more than my needs for some weekend ski trips lol.
At $85,000 it should be a awesome travel trailer!
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Old 08-12-2022, 10:51 AM   #12
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For that kind of money I would think you could get room on or near the slopes for many weekends. Also I would think camping in the parking lot would be frowned upon if for no other reason than snow removal. Most towns here in Vermont ban over night on street parking for the same reason.

FWIW Hancock NFS campground, a few miles east of Lincoln NH (Loon Mtn) has remained open all winter for years. Bring lots of propane.
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Old 08-13-2022, 06:53 AM   #13
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You can get a used Bigfoot 17.5’ for a lot less than $80K, and likely less than the small Oliver. It will not have the performance of the high end expedition units, but I think it would be adequate for your ski weekends and definitely better than the Oliver (think Tennessee winter vs. Canadian winter). I believe the small 17.5’ four season model (1" rigid insulation, enclosed plumbing and tanks, thermal wndows) was first manufactured c. 2005.

You might need to upgrade the battery system to lithium and add solar panels to provide enough power for a weekend off grid in cold weather. The furnace is a power hog, but it’s necessary to protect your plumbing. A small portable generator for recharging is another option.

Our local ski area (we live in the other White Mountains) rents RV spots with power, which would eliminate the power worry. Don’t know how common that is in New England nor what their rules might be on overnight boondocking. I assumed others were already doing it. A travel trailer is more conspicuous and takes more space than a van camper.
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Old 08-13-2022, 01:45 PM   #14
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Trailer: 2020 BigFoot 25RQ
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Would you dry camp, or would you want running water and a toilet?

I agree with everything Jon in AZ says. We have a Bigfoot travel trailer, cozy in colder weather. You have to run the furnace to keep the pipes from freezing (rather than an electric heater). It sends hot air around the water lines. We have solar panels and a lithium battery. We chose Bigfoot over Oliver.

We used to have a Mercedes Sprinter Van. Less conspicuous. You can get them in four wheel drive. I have a friend who has one that he modified to use diesel rather than propane. He likes it. Less room for the dogs.
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Old 08-13-2022, 01:59 PM   #15
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At $85,000 it should be a awesome travel trailer!
Why would anyone pay $85,000 for one? That's like paying the highest price you can find for a car. Not a valid argument. There is a big difference between MSRP and the real price.
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Old 08-13-2022, 04:59 PM   #16
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You can't beat a Bigfoot
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Old 08-13-2022, 05:13 PM   #17
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Or the Nash 17. Even though it has a lower R value than their Arctic Fox 22, it is five feet shorter so you would be heating that much less volume.
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Old 08-13-2022, 06:23 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by Joe333x View Post
Hi guys, I'm new to travel trailers, I've done all my camping in tents thus far. I am skier and would like to be able to Boondock in the parking lot overnight to hit the slopes in the morning. I live near Boston so the mountains are 3 hours away so being able to make the trip up on a Friday and spend the weekend would be great. Also if I get a camper then obviously I'd use it in the summer over the tent. Im not really interested in going to trailer parks, more interested in boondocking and national forests. My TV will be a Tundra 5.7. Its just me and my two dogs. From what I can tell the best option for that would be an Oliver, or maybe a Bigfoot? Do any of the other fiberglass trailers come ready to go camping below freezing?
Look at the fiberglass Truck campers. This may fit what you want to do.
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Old 08-14-2022, 07:12 AM   #19
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Seems like he has already considered- and rejected- a slide-in due to the need for a larger truck.
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IIf I were going to be a larger truck, I'd be getting a slide in bigfoot instead.
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Old 08-14-2022, 03:29 PM   #20
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Name: Alan & Penny
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We own a 2016 Armadillo (13’ class). We’re not winter campers per se, but we have been out in first snowfall and down to -1 or 2 (C). While we aren’t really “winter campers”, we are definitely boondockers; we never hesitate to go where others aren’t! The Armadillo is actually built with winter in mind with good insulation and a furnace. We were very comfortable in cooler conditions.

So if you’re okay with a smaller living space, I highly recommend having a look at Armadillo’s (currently being built in Armstrong, B.C. At somewhere in $35K (Canadian) range to start, they’re not cheap, but they are really good. You would be hard pressed to find a used one on the market.

As far as pulling requirements, the trailer GVW is only 1,785 lbs; we used to have a 2016 Jeep Cherokee with a 3.2L V6 which was just fine. We live in mountainous country in the British Columbia South Interior, so “flat” really doesn’t fall into our vocabulary very often. We currently have a Jeep Grand Cherokee with a 5.7L V8 and you hardly notice it’s there.

Happy trailer buying!!!
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