NEWBIE: Egg vs. Lil Snoozy advice - Page 6 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 01-23-2014, 12:20 PM   #101
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I personally like the smaller eggs and if I was on my own, could definitely see myself in a 15' Escape.
Me too, if one was willing to forgo a bathroom, I think the Escape 15A is close to an ideal layout for a smaller trailer.

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Old 01-23-2014, 12:41 PM   #102
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Me too, if one was willing to forgo a bathroom, I think the Escape 15A is close to an ideal layout for a smaller trailer.
We ordered one and cancelled. At the time the front and rear windows were fixed. On one side was a slider and the other side was the emergency window. Not enough ventilation for us. Different strokes...... Raz
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Old 01-23-2014, 01:20 PM   #103
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Out of all of the manufacturers building fiberglass eggs these days, the fact is that the smallest eggs (the 13'ers) are a huge minority, almost a niche within a niche market. Greatest demand seems to be for something larger than the smallest of the small. Proof of that is when Escape dropped the 13' from their lineup and introduced the 21'. As far as Eggs go, 15' to 17' seems to be a typical size, but I would guess that the larger sizes (19' and 21') are making huge inroads in the market. Even though I love the smallest spaces, they would not work for me at this time, which is why I went with a 19'.

And no, a 19' is not a park model and does not require a large tow vehicle to pull, as many others on this forum can attest. I downsized to an Toyota FJ Cruiser from a Ford F150 Supercrew full size 4x4 truck, and my small SUV is a great tow vehicle for my Escape.
ActuallyThe 13s are not the smallest of the small there are smaller still trailers and at least the 16s can still be considered small.
Over half of all Scamps made are 13s and 2/3s of the balance are 16s.
While the largest Casita is still only a 17, they still make 13s and 16s.
Parkliners are 15ft, and don't forget Weis Craft trailers with the Little Joe and the Ponderosa.
L'il Snoozy still claims to be "L'Il".
Even though your claim has little actual merit, I agree that there is a need and a market for the larger fiberglass trailers. The genre generally offers better build quality and towability than it's stickbuilt counterparts which usually results in better value overall.
Still at this point the OLiver (Perhaps the largest of the large) is certainly a niche within a niche market which is vastly dominated by the small fiberglass trailers 16' and under.
The genre began with the 13fter and has expanded to offerings both large and small.
Even the advent of the the behemoth or leviathon will certainly not negate the value, quality or utility of the minuscule or moderate.
Whether Spartan or Faberge' the 13 Egg stands tall among peers, surpassed only in sheer volume, which is not seen by all as advantageous.

I have yet to type a single derogatory word toward the Escape and see no reason to do so.
Some have claimed claustrophobia in relation to the smaller Eggs, I have not even implied that agoraphobia might be triggered upon entry of larger offerings, since both are maladies peculiar to the owner and not a fault to be found in the product.
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Old 01-23-2014, 06:35 PM   #104
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Originally Posted by Missouri Mark View Post
I am sold on fiberglass trailer - #1 reason I want something light so I don't have to get a big heavy duty pickup truck. I'm a big guy - 6'4" and 280lbs. ...snip... I will spend some time in the mountains and having a small pickup or SUV is a must for me - I definitely want to save money by travelling light. I know nothing about RVs and not very mechanical. I have a few necessities I will have to have - good AC/heat, good bed, and Sat TV (travelling alone, sports fan, I will need TV access). Do fiberglass trailers stay warm in sub freezing temps? I won't go too extreme but could see myself in the Rockies in the fall.
........whole bunch of snipping.............


Mark, Ste. Genevieve, Missouri
WARNING TO THE FAINT OF HEART: Heresy about to be spoken!

I've read this whole thread, Mark, and I hope you don't mind my editing your opener (above) down to what I understand to be your requirements. I believe you also posted that you'd like to stay under 2,000 pounds loaded and I'll say right off the bat that requirement isn't going to be met by ANY trailer recommended so far. Though I think you've already realized that...

BUT

Since (as I highlighted above) your main reason for choosing molded fiberglass has to do with its presumed "lightness", I thought you'd be interested to know that there's a non-FG trailer on the market that (depending on equipment) is lighter than any fiberglass rig of comparable size: the all-aluminum Camplite This is a very high quality trailer that's just as rot-proof as FG trailers if not more so, it using no wood at all. Which claim can be made by few if any FG trailermakers.

Its interior headroom is 6'4", and at seven feet wide (6" wider than most FG's), even a fellow as tall as you are could stretch out full length on the bed.

Anyway, just think you ought to check them out...prices are well within the same range as the trailers under discussion so far.

We now return the discussion to its "Family Friendly " fiberglass-only theme...
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Old 01-23-2014, 06:53 PM   #105
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Yes, the Camplite seems like a very good trailer to me, too. I would add, though, that it will push more air than an egg because of its square shape. My current trailer is square and compared to the Burro I formerly had, this trailer costs me 2 mpg (from 14 to 12) and I definitely can tell that the drive train is working harder. Just so you know what to expect, Mark.
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Old 01-23-2014, 07:12 PM   #106
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We considered a Camplight before purchasing our trailers. Camplite trailers are not particularly lighter than fiberglass trailers. An unoptioned Scamp sized Camplight (16 feet) has a dry weight of 2250 lbs and as Mike said, a larger frontal area..


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Old 01-23-2014, 08:01 PM   #107
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Thanks Francesca. Like I said I haven't ruled any out. CampLite would be a nice unit too.
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Old 01-24-2014, 11:23 AM   #108
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Frame construction

If you plan to keep a new trailer for a number of years, or purchase a used unit, careful consideration should be made regarding the frame.

There have been a number of posts regarding frame problems such as rust and even frame failure to the point of requiring total replacement.

Aluminum would be my first choice. It is lighter, doesn't rust, but would definitely change the price point of the trailer.

Most manufactures seem to use thin wall tubular steel. Reasons I'm sure being low cost and reasonably light weight.

Eggcamper uses channel steel which does not have the problem of rusting from within. Also, when the frame is painted all surfaces are coated which does not generally happen with tube construction unless the frame is dipped.

Any rust that may develop can be seen and corrective action taken. Tube frames don't permit you to see the progression of decay until it very severe.

Eggcamper does have the very common 4" square tube rear bumper. I wish it was channel like the rest of the trailer. However it can easily be replaced when necessary without having to remove the cabin from the frame.
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Old 01-24-2014, 04:40 PM   #109
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Originally Posted by Wayne Perpall View Post
If you plan to keep a new trailer for a number of years, or purchase a used unit, careful consideration should be made regarding the frame.

There have been a number of posts regarding frame problems such as rust and even frame failure to the point of requiring total replacement.

Aluminum would be my first choice. It is lighter, doesn't rust, but would definitely change the price point of the trailer.

Most manufactures seem to use thin wall tubular steel. Reasons I'm sure being low cost and reasonably light weight.

Eggcamper uses channel steel which does not have the problem of rusting from within. Also, when the frame is painted all surfaces are coated which does not generally happen with tube construction unless the frame is dipped.

Any rust that may develop can be seen and corrective action taken. Tube frames don't permit you to see the progression of decay until it very severe.

Eggcamper does have the very common 4" square tube rear bumper. I wish it was channel like the rest of the trailer. However it can easily be replaced when necessary without having to remove the cabin from the frame.
Can you point to one case where a reasonable person could be persuaded that internal rust was the cause of a travel trailer frame failure?
Of course it could happen, but it's certainly not common enough to affect a purchase choice.
I have seen several failures on various makes,... all stress or impact cracks.

My Scamp is now 10 years old and nearing 70,000 towed miles.
I visually inspect the frame as part of normal maintenance. I think the doorside tongue attachment is a little weird,but it still looks like new.
It is a front bath with a 27battery, propane tank,and a bike rack with two bikes all on the tongue.
If you get a trailer with an aluminum frame, check the alloy and also find a specialized weld tech for mods or repairs.

Note...On bicycles at least, a thousand aluminum frames fail for every steel frame.

The following is facetious....This sounds sorta like the tire thing...Should we just get a new frame whenever we get new tires?
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Old 01-24-2014, 05:34 PM   #110
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I just found this online - 2010 18' Forest River R Pod R171 -good price- looks similar to other models discussed here - anyone have any knowledge on this one
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:03 PM   #111
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I think used is clearly the way to go, get some experience and find out a). what you personally like and don't like. b) what you see in other campers out in the real world that would address your needs better.

Most of us don't purchase our "ideal" house as our first home. Eventually we know from experience the features we must have and those we value enough to pay for them. Either in terms of space, weight or dollar cost.

I would say that bed size is more important than roof height. Your going to want a comfortable nights rest for many hours every night, much less time walking around inside as a rule. Don't forget beds are bigger corner to corner, if solo it's all yours with a partner maybe the couch for the smaller person is an option.

Only reason I can think of to start large is if you know that your usage will require that space, enough to make cost of purchasing a larger rig and towing it worth it to you.

Whatever you get if you purchase FG used in good condition at a fair price and maintain it you will be able to recover much of your investment if you want to change to something else later.

In at least one or two 13 ft. campers there have been people that added an extension coming out into the walk way and sleep lengthwise, across the bed. It's sort of like the big cat and the shoe box.... who says it's too small? I'm inside aren't I?
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:15 PM   #112
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I just found this online - 2010 18' Forest River R Pod R171 -good price- looks similar to other models discussed here - anyone have any knowledge on this one
In my search, I saw a couple of these at an RV Show in Tulsa, OK.
I liked the layout, but being a cabinet maker and upholster I did not
like the cheap material used and didn't think it would last long.
Especially with the rowdy grandkids I have.

For starting out, and the price difference it might be okay for some.

We have a special needs daughter that just turned 22.
She will always be with us, so sleeping for 3 is a must have.
I wanted a full time bed and a place for her. So the Snoozy
met our needs and with the cassette toilet/shower.
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Old 01-24-2014, 07:23 PM   #113
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I just found this online - 2010 18' Forest River R Pod R171 -good price- looks similar to other models discussed here - anyone have any knowledge on this one
As stick-built trailers go, the Forest River stuff has a pretty decent reputation. Expect them to push wind nearly the same as any other stick trailer; despite the rounded top, the corners are still squared off and several R-Pod owners reported on their forum that they get about 12 mpg.

I have to say that a used stickie will be more affordable than a used molded FG unit, so you can get more bang for your buck initially. And most of the interior appliances and stuff are the same across the board. Where you sacrifice with any stickie is the greater wind resistance (lower mpg and need more HP) as well as the many seams that can eventually leak (which can, if not caught quickly, seriously mess up or even destroy a trailer). You may note from my photo that I have a stick-built myself right now.
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Old 01-25-2014, 08:16 AM   #114
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Thanks. Forgive my ignorance - from the picture it looks the same as the fiberglass models so I assumed the R Pod was constructed the same. It makes sense that the R Pod with wood construction will eventually show signs of wear and tear, and deterioration sooner than the all fiberglass models. I am naively optimistic that when I buy my travel trailer, I plan on owning it for life - much the same as my vehicles. I will have to store it out in the weather. I am assuming that, other than a weathered appearance, it really doesn't hurt the fiberglass models. I can see where wood constructed models will deteriorate due to seams leaking, and wood expanding and contracting out in the weather. Aging is another major plus for fiberglass models.

I'm learning, folks, thanks again for all of the advice. I am overwhelmed by the response to my post - 9 pages - WOW.
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Old 01-25-2014, 08:53 AM   #115
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What we have on here is "molded fiberglass."
Other types are stick builds with maybe a fiberglass sheet on it.
Even with the fiberglass sheet, the sticks still have the same problems.
Not that some molded fiberglass trailers don't have their own problems.

The two are definitely two different animals.
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