What trailer to buy? - Page 11 - Fiberglass RV


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Old 07-04-2017, 08:13 PM   #201
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Looks nice but it seems to be very expensive for a 13. Almost everything is optional.
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Old 07-04-2017, 10:20 PM   #202
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Way too small for us, but I am impressed with the design based on the photos. Looks high end.
I'd like to have one in my stable, but alas I can only have one.
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Old 07-05-2017, 06:33 AM   #203
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armadillotrailers.net looks pretty high quality. Maybe as they grow and get established they will build a 16 or 17 footer. Nice insulation shown too.

I see they are forum members here.
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insulat.jpg   storage.jpg  

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Old 07-05-2017, 06:41 AM   #204
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Armadillo pricing appears comparable to Happier Camper after you factor in the exchange rate. Both are high end 13'ers, though very different in concept. I agree, though- I'd rather have a large window that opens in the back. Oh, wait... I already do.
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Old 07-05-2017, 09:12 AM   #205
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I want to know how much it costs to fix that storage tray on the bottom when you whack it on a rock or stump.
Usually big slides like those stick when you get the tray fully extended. I made an aluminum rear box for skiis with extension slides like that which would get sticky/hung up after only a couple of winters even using lithium grease.
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Old 07-05-2017, 11:21 AM   #206
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It will be an excellent question for me to ask when they get back to me.
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Old 07-05-2017, 12:56 PM   #207
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More questions regarding the Armadillo

I realize the Armadillo is excellent for cold weather camping (built in Canada), but what about Florida? I live there at minimum six months per year. Would that climate hurt my Armadillo if I were to buy one? What about mould and condensation issues, are there any?
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Old 07-05-2017, 02:09 PM   #208
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Have no fear, construction folks have been using those truck bed tool slides for many years.
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Old 07-05-2017, 07:14 PM   #209
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We all have our individual likes and dislikes. Our personal preferences about interior design. Me too.

Real things are better than fake things, even if the fake thing reminds me of the real thing. For instance, pressboard cabinets with a picture of wood glued to the surface. Or a fine looking sound system that doesn't actually work well enough to use. Or "Extreme" printed on the outside of the trailer, that actually gives no insulating or bad weather advantage. Etc, etc. What about the tires and suspension system. A very important aspect. I would never decide on a trailer because it had nice cabinets, and never look at the suspension, or the propane system, or the tank capacities, etc.

Maybe some of us feel warmer in wood interiors while others feel they are dated. It's all a matter of taste.

To me, the emotional sensation when I walk into a trailer isn't as important as the underlying build integrity. I've paid a heavy price for thinking multiple trailers were "warm" or "ready for the winter" or had "real" oak interiors, so they must be good, etc.

I'm trying to say, look beyond your initial gut reaction to pre-conceived "must have" features, and look at why or how the features play into the overall package. I judge too. I looked at an Escape and immediately decided that the standard white utility trailer wheels were ugly and indicative of cost saving methods. The plastic fittings weren't up to the task, etc. But they are great trailers. I looked at Oliver and those items were fine and the whole package seems better, But then I found wiring glitches and poor decisions showed up in other ways with them.

Some have talked about the interior design, and some designs are brilliant. Rear bath with rear side door entry allows a very good interior, for instance. The Oliver has a more conventional design, but it turns out that the batteries are under the dinette seat and that mandates the seating design. Cool. Much better weight distribution and the ability to open the truck tailgate without interference. A trade-off that makes sense if you look slightly deeper. Airstreams have the reputation and are beautiful, but they are weekend apartments much more than boondocking trailers. So look there if you want a luxury apartment. My Thor toy hauler had a large water tank, but it was located right in front and placed a big load on the tongue, or not, as determined by how much water was loaded. A constant variable that didn't play well. A feature you'd never notice by walking in and getting the feel of the place.

Of course, we want to be happy in our trailers. Their features are there to accommodate us. If we find that some designs are different than we expect, but excellent is some way, it might make sense to recognize that the trailer is not a house, this time is not some other time, we may get more use and pleasure from something that was not initially on our "must have" list. A 13' Scamp might be just the ticket if you want to tow it with a compact car. I have spent a lot of nights in a tent, or even out under the stars in a cold winter night. Times like that, a small Cassita would have been an extreme luxury and I would not have judged it by the cabinet door material.

So, it's not just about the first emotional impression. Look further and see why, or see the quality of the implementation. If you can't decide, maybe you're not ready to actually go camping, or maybe the differences make do real difference and you could just pick one at random. In the end, the trailer is a means to an end. We get to go explore wonderful places and have an excellent place to call home while we do.

We went to Phoenix and Scottsdale a couple of years ago to visit a sanctuary we are closely tied to. Hot. Rainy. Dusty. Windy. But we could focus all of our attention on the animals because we had an accommodating trailer with air conditioning where we could withdraw and relax in the evenings. Heading back, we stopped at Grand Canyon for a few days, then Death Valley for a few more (in August) and spent time at a hot springs. I was hoping it would pour torrential rain and take out the road as it was threatening to do. We spent time laughing and watching the wild burros as they meandered through camp. Some coyotes showed us more about their family structure. Bats, at night, dipped to the water's surface to get a drink in the near total darkness. And I visited the spot where I spread my father's ashes, under an oasis palm in the gurgling desert stream. During that trip, I don't think I even once monitored my feelings about the emotions related to the tone of the wood on the cabinets, or the "hospital" like interior of an Oliver.

Some years ago I was in Mexico and camping in my Ford Taurus wagon. Pretty minimal, but a memorable trip still talked about today. On the way down, a hundred miles or so below the border, at the nicest and simplest camping area, a couple came in in a Ford Ranger with a camper shell. They were in their seventies and just out on an adventure. They were having a great time camping and I was immediately drawn to them. A simple trip with the minimum of equipment, and having a great time. They really seemed to know how to live and enjoy life.

The stories related to the desert, and to camping in general, can go on endlessly, and you won't experience them unless you get out there. Searching is a fun project, but it's a means to an end.


What a grand way to talk about what's really important Raspy. Just get out there!
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Old 07-05-2017, 07:46 PM   #210
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I went from scamp to an escape 17b w carefully selected options. Things that have not been mentioned in this thread are that escape trailers industries have 2 yr warrantee, many options on other fg trailers are standard, ability to customize and great support system in escapeforum. Can u tell I love my Escape?
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Old 07-15-2017, 08:17 AM   #211
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Everyone posts their's :)

Pretty evident which we choose. Pricey. Had to shallow very hard and promise we would use the snot out of it to each other. Ours is the 24'ter. I don't think I would spring for the under 17'ter Oliver personally. Not much cheaper than our 24 and you can get a better buy in another brand.
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Old 07-15-2017, 08:23 AM   #212
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I suppose that's true. If you are spending almost the same, go for more comfort in the larger one, provided you can tow it.
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Old 07-15-2017, 08:34 AM   #213
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Yep on another brand, don't know much about any of them other than my cousin's Casita which suits their needs as they tow with a pretend Honda "truck" (with a car frame). It seems nice. The Oliver under 17ft is pricey and not worth the double price of comparables.

When we were looking we noticed on the Casita forum they tend to leak and the wooden flooring turns to mush. They also sweat but past those two problems are nice. Casitas have a real brand following and people get touchy when mentioning the floor problem. We don't see many eggs at all east of the Mississippi here in the South. Would love to run into some Escapes and Scamps etc out on the road. Bigfoots look nice. Again on the west coast and Canada production and sales possibility.

Maybe in FL? Know of only 2-3 Oliver owners in TN ironically.

Original poster was vague where they were located and how far they were willing to travel to get an egg. In our case the Oliver is produced in our state. Great when warrantee work is necessary. Even the high priced spreads up to a year old have kinks in them to work out.

We had a 2002 Tundra that had back drum brakes and a smaller engine. Had a truck cap and was all but new and smelled new with only 30K on it. had a bed mat, bed rug walls, and trimmed out nicely. Inside and engine no wear. I mourned having to give it up. Traded it in before picking up the Oliver.

For margin of safety we went up to the larger 4 wheel disk brakes and 5.7 engine V8 Tundra 2016. Had to buy another bed cap and get Linex liner, mats, etc. Fortunately got a great trade in. Our 2002 cherry only lasted until the next morning on the lot.

People don't realize you can pull with practically anything but it's stopping to be concerned about. Also you can have a too short tow vehicle ratio to a longer FB. There are some people who get the Oliver 24ft and have a very unsuitable vehicle. One even tows with a small SUV. Not smart at all and a public safety hazard. The intended hitch doesn't even fit on it. And they wound up smoking off their brakes.

Advice to anyone do your research and math. If you aren't willing to buy a vehicle to match if your existing vehicle is not rated well with a large safety margin you are asking for a world of hurt or you are tempting fate. The intended hitch and leveling/antisway may not work on a small SUV. The aforementioned person twisted his aluminum frame and has had multiple problems too.

Public safety is all of our responsibilities.
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Old 07-15-2017, 05:03 PM   #214
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I respect everyone's opinion here and I appreciate so much all the help all the members have been. I have learned a lot and know there is so much more to learn. Thanks again everybody!
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Old 07-15-2017, 05:21 PM   #215
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Good thread. Thank you for posting.
Let us know what you arrive at for a decision.
It all comes down to what RV fits your needs and your towing capacity.
Raspy's post was very good.
Figure out what you need in a RV.
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Old 07-16-2017, 06:57 PM   #216
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A bunch of off-topic and/or argumentative posts have been removed from this thread. PLEASE remember to be helpful and courteous.

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Old 07-16-2017, 10:17 PM   #217
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Huh? I missed a good donnybrook? Shucks.

Main thing is to get out there and camp whatever way you can. Don't worry about picking out a 'perfect' trailer, there's no such thing. And we humans change our minds (and circumstances change too) so quickly, our ideas of what makes a perfect trailer will probably be different in a year or five. Just buy something, start enjoying it, and sort out the details later.
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Old 07-16-2017, 11:15 PM   #218
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Huh? I missed a good donnybrook? Shucks.
You didn't miss anything Mike, believe me.
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Just buy something, start enjoying it, and sort out the details later.
Isn't that what the typical wanna be RVer does? Just show up at an RV dealer lot and buy whatever looks good or the salesman pushes them toward? Fiberglass RVers, by nature I think, give it a little more thought. Cool as they are, fiberglass trailers are still a rarity at your average RV park or campground.

I agree however that holding off until you get the "perfect" one is futile. Get one that checks off most boxes for you and get on with it.
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Old 07-17-2017, 05:38 AM   #219
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I agree however that holding off until you get the "perfect" one is futile. Get one that checks off most boxes for you and get on with it.
So new readers wouldn't have to read through the entire thread (though it may be worthwhile now that it has been preened) I can report that the trailers that check off the most boxes, at least for us, are in our order of favorites: Eggcamper, Armadillo, Oliver, and Parkliner. What we are waiting for is to get rid of something before we add to our possessions, those being a cabin in northern Michigan and/or a vacant lot in Apalachicola. We have other properties as well but we are not in position to sell due to poor market conditions. I have a personal new rule that I will not accumulate something in addition to what I already have without getting rid of least one of them. Plus we have to attend a January wedding in Mexico and may not get out of there alive (depending on current and future U.S. politics), so we really are prepared to wait to take delivery on a new trailer for sometime in February 2018. But if we sell our cabin within the next few weeks we would most likely order one of the above as we would no longer have our summer sanctuary to hide in. The problems with the above Eggs listed are:
1. Eggcamper is not making new trailers yet.
2. Armadillo is 2000 miles from my cabin and in Canada.
3. Oliver is a hair too big, promises almost perfection, but a bit more expensive than we want to spend for its remarkably few imperfections.
4. Parkliner might also be a bit too big, I might hate dealing with a pushy uneducated dealership salesman, and the interior decor might feel offensive to the tastes of my wife and I.
In the meantime we will continue to view firsthand the eggs we can, proceed in our RV education and troubleshooting, and build new alliances and mentors in the process.
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Old 07-17-2017, 06:37 AM   #220
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I agree however that holding off until you get the "perfect" one is futile. Get one that checks off most boxes for you and get on with it.
This is great advice. Get the "most perfect" trailer and get out there. Unless you have property to sell first.... then researching might be the next best thing!
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