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Old 04-04-2015, 08:44 PM   #21
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Name: Ron
Trailer: 2015 Oliver Legacy Elite II - Hull #69
South Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
All the data says stay in school, earn more money over a lifetime. I don't think just a high school education cuts it anymore.
I'm not speaking from experience since I did okay and I never did get the two courses I needed for graduation. Web designer is one of those courses you see advertised on TV, suggesting that there are thousands upon thousands of web designers out there.
On the other hand, lots of baristas out there with BAs too.
Wow, all these responses and only one voice of reason. I'll add to it.

Go to college kid. It's an invaluable experience and will pay dividends over your lifetime. You've got plenty of time for travel and adventure and little trailers.
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Old 04-04-2015, 10:29 PM   #22
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Name: Michael
Trailer: Li'l Hauley
Oklahoma
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Originally Posted by Ron Merritt View Post
Wow, all these responses and only one voice of reason. I'll add to it.

Go to college kid. It's an invaluable experience and will pay dividends over your lifetime. You've got plenty of time for travel and adventure and little trailers.
I acknowledge that the conventional wisdom says 'go to college.' However, in today's economic climate I say 'not necessarily.' College has become prohibitively expensive, causing grads to come out saddled with a ridiculously heavy loan-repayment burden. Meanwhile, hardly anyone is advised to learn a trade, and consequently the roofers, carpenters, drywall hangers, plumbers, and such can make extremely good money with little or no special education.

My own son disregarded (thankfully) my advice to attend college. Instead, as a high school junior he enrolled in afternoon CAD (computer aided drafting) classes at the local tech school (which I foolishly thought was for the 'dumb' or 'underachiever' kids). He applied himself and impressed the instructor, so during autumn of his senior year the instructor recommended him to a company looking for a trainee, and he 'jobbed out' (regular high school in a.m., go to work in p.m., getting both school credits and hourly pay for the work). This led to a permanent position with a different company immediately after graduation. That company now calls him an engineer, pays his tuition to attend evening college classes, and pays him about $80K/year plus benefits.
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Old 04-04-2015, 11:13 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by Ron Merritt View Post
Wow, all these responses and only one voice of reason. I'll add to it.

Go to college kid. It's an invaluable experience and will pay dividends over your lifetime. You've got plenty of time for travel and adventure and little trailers.
I did all the "right things". Went to college, got a career, owned a home...and was miserable. I fear he might be more miserable because he knows about and craves this life style.

If I had to do it all over again? I would have gone on the road, I believe traveling and meeting people and all the joys and difficulties of it may be more beneficial for some people. I was so shy!! I was so miserable! But I was doing what everybody told me to do. "Build your credit!" they said. "Get your degree!" they said. "Own a home, prepare for your old age!" they said. All for naught for me. It was done, I spent 25yrs working, in school, paying bills, paying off debt, borrowing money I didn't have just so I could have what everybody else had.

I gave away/sold it all and what a freaking relief! I also came out of my shell and am now the most social person I know!

"The Way" isn't for everybody. "Security" in my opinion, isn't really all that secure.

I say, follow your heart and your dreams!!! Be smart and you can be happy with almost nothing. I will whole heartily vouch for that.
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Old 04-05-2015, 01:26 AM   #24
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Name: Dave
Trailer: Casita SD17 2006 "Missing Link"
California
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Originally Posted by Mike Magee View Post
I acknowledge that the conventional wisdom says 'go to college.' However, in today's economic climate I say 'not necessarily.' College has become prohibitively expensive, causing grads to come out saddled with a ridiculously heavy loan-repayment burden.
Interesting thread going here with multiple replies both pro and con. Reminds me of what I've said for almost fifty years, college is not for everyone. Some people just know what they want to be or do from an early age and a 4 year college may not be the way to get there. A vocational school for your interest may be best. Bottom line to me is you have to love whatever job you do, the money is secondary. Sure would have been hard to get up every morning hating the job. Hope the OP can find a way to follow her dream as she is one of the few that have a goal so early in life.
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:10 AM   #25
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Trailer: Escape 5.0 TA, 2014
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If we had a crystal ball (that worked!) we'd all know what to do. I like so many others, did what I was told to do. I have a graduate degree, work for the same company for years, have a company pension (unheard of today), my 401K was tooting along. Then the crash of 2006. Financially, I would have done better if I would have thrown all my money under the mattress.

But you know what? I own an all-molded towable and even if the economy tanks again, I'll never need to sleep under a bridge. And to me, that's huge. If Alex buys a trailer, neither will he.

You can kinda tell, he will do well. Maybe not in his chosen field always and right away, but I bet he could get a job to get by. Employers like to hire people like him.
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:46 AM   #26
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Name: Bob
Trailer: 1973 Hunter Compact II
California
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Quote: " Employers like to hire people like him."


Ya, but those employers are named McDonalds, Burger King and Wendy's. LOLOLOL


Seriously though, there is a lot to be said for spending a year or two in the real world between High school and College. At many colleges and universities, as few as 50% of entering freshmen finish a 4 year program. And there is even more to be said to the advantages of spending the first two years of college in a community college. Not to mention the maturity growth & $$$ benefits of some time in the military.


I know, I did all of the above and it worked well for moi.
BTW: G.I. Bill paid clear through Grad school.



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Old 04-05-2015, 08:10 AM   #27
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Name: Huck
Trailer: ParkLiner
Virginia
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Knowing what I know now, this is what I would do if I was your age.

I'd work my butt off at a real job or 2 for the next 6 months and save as much money as possible. This will give you references to get jobs while on the road. I would also grow my programming business. You need references and sites to show future customers.

I would also build a demo site.

Over the 6 months, I would determine the minimum I need to make it for 1 year on the road. How much of a home/work space do you need? Would a van be a 1 year solution or do you really need a tow and trailer? What do you need for meals? AC? etc.

Since you will be working full-time and have some money saved up, time to get a small loan if necessary. It might be easier to get a car loan than an RV loan, so a van might be easier to finance. Maybe a van for the 1st year and then add a trailer later if you decide to stay on the road.

You might also check out Chris & Cherie at technomadia. They full-time and make a living on the road.

There are government campgrounds where you can volunteer 20-25 hours a week and get a free campsite with wifi and laundry. I think sometimes they even provide the trailer or room. Something like that would give you a place to stay, an opportunity to meet people, get experience, and give you plenty of time to work on your business, site see, etc.
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Old 04-05-2015, 01:14 PM   #28
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Name: Bill
Trailer: In the market
Nevada
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in retrospect

1. Don't give up on your dream! Believe in yourself when nobody else does. Don't let anyone talk you out of it. You'll never regret it.
2. Anything worth having is worth working hard for.
3. Be resourceful, frugal, and flexible.
4. You are starting at the right place, this forum.
5. Good luck.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:08 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
All the data says stay in school, earn more money over a lifetime. I don't think just a high school education cuts it anymore.
I'm not speaking from experience since I did okay and I never did get the two courses I needed for graduation. Web designer is one of those courses you see advertised on TV, suggesting that there are thousands upon thousands of web designers out there.
On the other hand, lots of baristas out there with BAs too.
I tend to agree with Glenn.

One of the thoughts that ran through my head when I read the opening post was, "if you want a carefree life on the road in the way you describe, Don't get anyone pregnant."

Edited: or get pregnant, whichever scenario applies.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:48 PM   #30
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Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
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Alex,

Life is really short, even if you live the normal life span or even longer.

Deciding what you want from life (or from anything) is the key, creating a plan is extremely useful, it provides a measuring stick.

I would invest a couple of months to figure out what I needed in terms of money (a budget) and equipment for the adventure (a list), read every thing I could on the topic (there are tons of people who have done it), meet people with experience (they are everywhere), and draw up a little plan.

I'd probably run the plan by some more experienced person and begin pulling the resources together. (You might be surprised by how much of the needed stuff can be collected from family and friends.)

I'd begin by executing the plan on a smaller scale, camping locally for a week or month. This will give a little experience and let you know what you need and be a test of your plan.

When we began I read everything, bought a used RV, parked it on the lawn and lived in it for a couple of months, kept track of everything we spent. completed some short travels and eventually took off for our first year, now in year 14.
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Old 04-05-2015, 02:56 PM   #31
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British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by honda03842 View Post
When we began I read everything, bought a used RV, parked it on the lawn and lived in it for a couple of months, kept track of everything we spent. completed some short travels and eventually took off for our first year, now in year 14.
You forgot to mention that you did this at age 60-ish after working for forty years; not at the age of 18, with no work experience and no post-secondary education, and no resources.
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Old 04-05-2015, 03:17 PM   #32
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Name: Norm and Ginny
Trailer: Scamp 16
Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo View Post
You forgot to mention that you did this at age 60-ish after working for forty years; not at the age of 18, with no work experience and no post-secondary education, and no resources.
Glenn I did it at 58 but what I described is generally how I've approached life.

At 16 I decided that the person one marries is critical to a successful life, maybe the most important decision. I recognized most people fell in love without conscious criteria, usually for almost without reasons. Often this results in poor or failed marriages, a terrible tragedy for all. I had seen in in my own family.

I considered the 400 girls in my high school class and made a list of 3 I thought would make life long partners. I dated each of them and decided on Ginny. I became engaged to Ginny as a junior in college and married her upon graduation.

So what I suggested is mostly, but not always, my way.

I'm from a different time than Alex, When I got out of high school, you most likely went to college, you finished in four years, you married, bought a home, had a family, life in 1964 was more programmed... there was little dilly dallying through college, the military saw to that.

There is a bigger measure of freedom today, unless you are truly focused and choose a good field of study college could be a large expenditure with poor financial results. So many fields of study offer little hope of solid employment.

I don't know Alex. Life is a series of choices, best choices are made with information and plans and not whimsy. If he makes conscious choices, he'll be able to make appropriate choices as he goes along.

Just one person's perspective.
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Old 04-05-2015, 06:18 PM   #33
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Name: Enigma
Trailer: Currently shopping
USA
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Lots of good advice given. Lin & Larry Pardey cruised on Saraffyn, a small, 24' sailboat. They said, "Go small, go simple, go now". They have had a very full life of travel and adventure since setting sail to live their dreams. However, Larry was a skilled seaman, carpenter and knew all about boat maintenance. He worked for about 10 years before realizing his dreams. Anyway, your desires/story made me recall Lin & Larry Pardey and their "Go small, go simple, go now" seems to fit somewhat into your desired egg plans. I agree with many, if you want it bad enough, you can make it happen. If you will continue to develop your web-design/application skills and business, it may be your ticket to such a lifestyle. Many of us have had dreams, such as you, but chose the safe and norm life instead, hoping we could realize our dreams later in life. Then mortgages, family, medical issues and other family obligations change, alter or delay our dreams, or worse, we never pursue the dream and it fades or dies with each passing year. It takes courage to make things happen and pursue a change in your lifestyle, but, if you want it bad enough, you will figure it out. Having said all of this, I believe it is vital that you have or find skill-sets that are marketable and offer you the ability to find employment throughout your travels. This may require trade school or some level of add'l education. Good luck and I hope your dreams come true.
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Old 04-05-2015, 07:32 PM   #34
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Name: Steve
Trailer: 16' Scamp
California
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Living Free

Living free is possible spiritually, but not physically. So, you do have some financial hurdles to get over and time will tell how that shapes up for you. While your figuring it out remember two things: 1. Delayed gratification is not a bad thing, but a wise principle of many who have achieved great things, and, 2. Life is what happens while we're making our plans. I applaud your asking for advice on this forum and look forward to reading your reply to ideas offered here.
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Old 04-06-2015, 06:30 PM   #35
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Well, we have 3 pages of replies to the original poster's one and only post on this website.
I think this topic has run it's course, and is now closed.
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