Broken prong on the cord to the fuse box - Page 2 - Fiberglass RV
Journey with Confidence RV GPS App RV Trip Planner RV LIFE Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Take a Speed Test Free 7 Day Trial ×


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-04-2017, 12:28 PM   #21
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 13 ft Scamp
Posts: 1,773
This ranks right up there w/replacing fuse with copper penny
alan H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2017, 04:01 PM   #22
Member
 
Name: Wenonah
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Ohio
Posts: 58
LOL, thank you to everyone! I ask someone in my Sunday School this morning to come over and take a look at it as they have several RVs and have worked on this particular problem before. Prior to their arrival I will but cutting off the end of the cord and taking it to a local RV supply shop and picking up the new plug. He is going to take a look at everything and help me put it on...I have learned so much since purchasing our Scamp. A lot of new tools too! Fun and frustrating all at the same time.
Wenonah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2017, 04:01 PM   #23
Member
 
Name: Wenonah
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Ohio
Posts: 58
It is sometimes hard for me to know when I need to get help and when I need to power through...
Wenonah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2017, 04:40 PM   #24
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 5,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wenonah View Post
...I ask someone in my Sunday School this morning to come over and take a look at it as they have several RVs and have worked on this particular problem before.....
gordon2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 04:40 AM   #25
Senior Member
 
Raspy's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: Roamer 1
Smith Valley, Nevada
Posts: 2,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wenonah View Post
All of the replacement plugs I am seeing for RVs on Amazon are 30 amp. Even though the current plug is a 20 amp plug, am I safe putting a 30 amp replacement plug on the cord or does the cord somehow have to match the cord? As I recall, the outlets in most campgrounds are for 30 amp plugs. Adapter?
Most trailers are designed for a 30 amp shore tie circuit and have a special 30 amp plug style that matches the 30 amp breaker on that circuit. They are set up for a 30 amp plug that is common at campsites. This will run the air conditioning and other loads.

But, If you are at home, or some other place that only has a standard household style plug available (normally 20 amps), you can get an adapter, from Camping World, or various trailer supply stores, that will adapt your trailer plug (30 amp style) to a household (15 amp style) plug. This is for convenience, but it doesn't mean you can draw 30 amps at the trailer.

BTW, common household plugs are mostly designed for, and have written on them, 15 amps. But general use plug circuits in houses are wired and rated for 20 amps and have 20 amp circuit breakers. This is a funny anomaly in the code. If the power draw exceeds the circuit breaker capacity the circuit will shut off with no harm done. This might happen if you were running two electric heaters in one of the bedrooms, for instance. If you look in the house electrical box with the circuit breakers, you'll see a row of switches. Each of those switches controls one circuit and each one has a number printed on the toggle, such as 15, or 20. These numbers are the maximum amps the breaker will carry without tripping off. Each of those breakers feeds a circuit with a number of plugs, but the combined load of the plugs on that circuit cannot exceed the value on the breaker.

So, if you plug your 30 amp shore power cord, with a 15 amp household adapter, into a household style plug, that really has a 20 amp breaker on it, you can draw up to 20 amps safely. More than that and it will trip off for safety. The trailer is probably able to demand more than this. For instance, if the air conditioning is on and the microwave comes on. Then the 20 amp max will be exceeded and the circuit breaker will trip. No harm done and no fires will start.

So, if you adapt your 30 amp plug to a 15 amp household style plug, you must use some discretion as to how much power you demand. Not because it's unsafe, but because the power is limited and will shut off if you draw too much. It's no big deal. Just be careful. No safety issues at all. But you won't get the full benefit of everything being on at once in the trailer. Remember, the cord adapter is for convenience and for low power draw to adapt your trailer to a convenient household plug. It allows you to run the refrigerator, the battery charger and some lights while you're home with no problem.

Or you could install a 30 amp, 120 volt style circuit and plug within reach of where you park the trailer and have all the conveniences that you have while at a campsite with hookups.
__________________
I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt.
Raspy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 09:55 AM   #26
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 825
Carl,
The amperage of the plug suggests nothing. A plug is simply a type of (temporary) union joining the various components of electrical systems. It's rating indicates maximum safe current capacity. Increasing the rated amperage actually INCREASES the safety margin.
The circuit is protected from overload and situations like overheating, fire etc. that can result by incorporating a current interrupting device such as a fuse of circuit breaker.
Installing a higher capacity plug does nothing to change the characteristics of the circuit. It still incorporates the same safety features. You could still use the same appliances safely. The circuit breaker would still trip or the fuse blow if the draw was beyond the capacity of the circuit.
You can use a 20 amp appliance on a 30 amp circuit without problem. If you try to draw 30 amps from a 20 amp circuit the incorporated protective device will open the circuit to stop the current flow.
I hope this makes sense to you.
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 10:16 AM   #27
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 825
Alan,
I'm not sure I'm understanding you here?
Plug amperage capacity only relates to the plug itself and has no bearing on the safety or capacity of anything else. The incorporated current interrupting devices (circuit breaker, fuse etc.) will still be present and functional. Using a higher amperage capacity plug actually INCREASES the safety margin!
A fuse is a current limiting device designed to open the circuit it protects should the current flow exceed the safe rated capacity if the circuit. Some fuses have a metal strip which will melt should the circuit it protects experience excessive current flow. Replacing a fuse of this type with a cooper penny incorporates a piece of metal into the circuit with a much higher current capacity than the original fuse, a capacity far beyond the safe current limit of the circuit. Instead of the penny melting to open the circuit, the wire itself can overheat and result in fire etc.
A fuse is a safety device and should only be replaced with one of the same capacity.
A plug is a device for joining the various components of an electrical system. Replacing a plug with one of lower capacity can cause overheating. Replacing a plug with one of higher capacity is never a problem and increases the safety margin.
I hope this helps.
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 10:17 AM   #28
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 825
Well said Raspy!
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 10:20 AM   #29
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 825
Wenonah,
There are a lot of people who are willing to give advise but not everyone should.
I too have gotten good advice at Sunday School.
Cheers,
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 11:06 AM   #30
Senior Member
 
C&G in FL's Avatar
 
Name: Carl
Trailer: 2015 Escape 5.0TA
Florida
Posts: 1,706
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_L View Post
Carl,
The amperage of the plug suggests nothing. A plug is simply a type of (temporary) union joining the various components of electrical systems. It's rating indicates maximum safe current capacity. Increasing the rated amperage actually INCREASES the safety margin.
The circuit is protected from overload and situations like overheating, fire etc. that can result by incorporating a current interrupting device such as a fuse of circuit breaker.
Installing a higher capacity plug does nothing to change the characteristics of the circuit. It still incorporates the same safety features. You could still use the same appliances safely. The circuit breaker would still trip or the fuse blow if the draw was beyond the capacity of the circuit.
You can use a 20 amp appliance on a 30 amp circuit without problem. If you try to draw 30 amps from a 20 amp circuit the incorporated protective device will open the circuit to stop the current flow.
I hope this makes sense to you.
Yes, it makes sense to me but I knew it prior to responding to your post. While what you say is technically true (that is why we can use 50 to 30 amp adapters if 50 amp is all the campground provides), it is still not an acceptable practice. Would you put a 50 amp plug on your 30 amp trailer? I'm guessing no; you would use an adapter if needed. Any "appliance," whether it be dishwasher or a table lamp is equipped by the manufacturer with a given sized plug for a reason. Electrical codes do not suggest that a 50 amp plug be put on a table lamp using one leg of the 240 volt source with zip cord simply because it is known that the light bulb will not pull enough power to create a fire hazard. And not every appliance, like most trailers, has a circuit breaker to limit the flow. I have seen older trailers that did not have a load center with breakers, just a line to a few outlets. In any event, what happens if some idiot has a bad 15 amp main breaker and replaces it with a 30 amp breaker, and then the next owner changes the defective 20 amp plug so that it can be plugged into a 30 amp outlet. The new owner plugs in a hair dryer while making coffee and the 14 gauge wire used for 15 amp circuits heats up and causes a fire. What you suggest can be hazardous because people have been known to do stupid things. And finally, let's just say you accidentally start a fire in your trailer and it gets destroyed. Dealt with any building inspectors or more importantly, insurance adjusters lately? You can be pretty well assured the adjuster will note all the details, including the fact that an older trailer with a 15 amp service which is now a total loss had its plug changed to one of a higher amperage. Good luck with that. The best advice one can give, especially to someone with little electrical knowledge, is to replace like with like. It's not as if plugs with the same amperage as that which is being replaced are in short supply. The amperage of a plug may suggest nothing to you, but to those uneducated in electrical circuits it surely may. I get your point, but I respectfully cannot agree with you.
C&G in FL is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 11:19 AM   #31
Member
 
Name: Wenonah
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Ohio
Posts: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Civilguy View Post
Wenona,

I think you should be able to go camping Monday.

You can readily purchase a 15A plug at Home Depot, Ace Hardware, etc. The plugs run from about $3 to about $8.

Cut the old plug off along with an inch of the cable and take it in to the store.

This video was one of the better ones I found. It is important to get the wires connected properly. In the picture I attached (below the video), the green wire connects to the round brass-colored plug, the white wire connects to the silver-colored blade plug, and the black wire connects to the brass-colored blade plug.

Most of the plugs you can buy won't have the blades color-coded, but the connections inside will be color coded.

If you are still not comfortable, try to ask more questions or get more help.

Excellent video and good advice. Thanks.
Wenonah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 11:22 AM   #32
Member
 
Name: Wenonah
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Ohio
Posts: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
As usual, there is no quick and final answer.

The plug in the picture is a standard 15 amp household plug, these are commonly used on 20 amp circuits with no problems. They are also used to connect a 30 amp trailer into a standard 20 amp receptacle in the house, but don't try to run an electric heater and the air conditioning at the same time. The adapters are for convenience, but not for full power. Use some discretion. I leave mine plugged in all the time, with a household plug, running the battery charger and refrigerator.

You can get a replacement plug (cord cap) and install it. Look for the heaviest duty one you can find and it might say 20 amps. Just cut off your cord and install the new plug. Be careful and keep the color coded wires in the right order.
You are right Raspy. It is a 15 amp plug. I cut off the plug and I am on my way to Loew's...
Wenonah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 11:45 AM   #33
Senior Member
 
Raspy's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: Roamer 1
Smith Valley, Nevada
Posts: 2,904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wenonah View Post
You are right Raspy. It is a 15 amp plug. I cut off the plug and I am on my way to Loew's...
Good. A common part and an easy repair. Get the best one you can find that clamps to the cord, and maybe even one that says 20 amps, if you can find it. The only difference between a 15 amp and a 20 amp household style plug, is how heavy duty they are inside, but either will plug in just the same into your house receptacles. While at Lowes, you might pick up a plug-in polarity tester to make sure you always have the correct polarity in the trailer after you plug in somewhere. About $4. or so, and a handy little tool that lights up to give you information.

Have a nice trip!
__________________
I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt.
Raspy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 01:07 PM   #34
Senior Member
 
Name: Gordon
Trailer: 2015 Scamp (16 Std Layout 4) with '15 Toyota Sienna LE Tug
North Carolina
Posts: 5,156
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raspy View Post
...The only difference between a 15 amp and a 20 amp household style plug, is how heavy duty they are inside, but either will plug in just the same into your house receptacles. ...
Below is a proper 20 amp plug.. It does not fit into a 15 (only) amp outlet. If anyone wants to correct me please include your electrician's license number and I will gladly admit I was wrong.


OK lets review…

The OP has a damaged 15 amp plug for shore power. The OP probably has a trailer originally designed to run on a 15 amp circuit. The prior owner of the camper added an air conditioner and there is no details given about that installation. The A/C when combined with other loads could easily exceed 15 amps. If the OP is using a 15 amp outlet and exceeds 15 amps, the campsite 15 amp circuit breaker should safely trip and cut off the power before damage is done.

However, if the OP uses an 30 to 15 adapter at a 30 amp campsite outlet, then the adapter and shore power cord (rated to 15 amps) could be overloaded (up to 30 amps), and be damaged or even start a fire. In this case, hopefully there is still a 15 amp main breaker in the camper, so that might protect the rest of the wiring but the adapter and shore power cord are not properly protected. In such a situation you should monitor you amp draw and pay attention to any warming of the adapter and shore power cord.

I have seen a 30 to 15 adapter melt in a similar situation and this was my concern along with checking to see if the A/C was properly wired.
Attached Thumbnails
Untitled-1 copy.jpg  
gordon2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2017, 07:22 PM   #35
Senior Member
 
Trailer: 13 ft Scamp
Posts: 1,773
I guess after rereading my post on this i should have edited it at bit
Raspy much better explanation than mine
alan H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2017, 09:51 AM   #36
Member
 
Name: Wenonah
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Ohio
Posts: 58
Thank you

Thank you Gordon, Raspy, and Alan,

I appreciate the time you took to explain the electrical to me. I am now on my way out to the camper to put the outlet on. I will let you know how it goes...
Wenonah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2017, 11:00 AM   #37
Member
 
Name: Wenonah
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Ohio
Posts: 58
Does this look right

This is where I am at. I have attached the wires in the appropriate receptacle. Green to green, white to silver and black to brass. However I can't close the replacement plug at the bottom because the cord is too thick. Should I get a longer screws or does this mean that the replacement plug won't work with that cord. It is a 15 amp replacement plug. I replaced like for like...Also, what is the paper between the colored wires for and can I cut them off? This is a 1989 Scamp. Perhaps things were different then?
Attached Thumbnails
2017-06-07 12.36.40.jpg   2017-06-07 12.38.41.jpg  

2017-06-07 12.39.28.jpg   2017-06-07 12.39.37.jpg  

Wenonah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2017, 11:15 AM   #38
Senior Member
 
Name: Michael
Trailer: Trail Cruiser
Alberta
Posts: 825
The part that doesn't fit is a clamp to secure the electrical cable to the plug and avoid strain to the wires that attach to the electrical connections. The best solution is to use a plug that can accommodate the cable size.
Mike_L is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2017, 11:35 AM   #39
Member
 
Name: Wenonah
Trailer: 13' Scamp
Ohio
Posts: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_L View Post
The part that doesn't fit is a clamp to secure the electrical cable to the plug and avoid strain to the wires that attach to the electrical connections. The best solution is to use a plug that can accommodate the cable size.
The plugs that can accommodate the cord aren't 15 amp. Therein lies the problem...
Wenonah is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-07-2017, 11:48 AM   #40
Senior Member
 
Raspy's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: Roamer 1
Smith Valley, Nevada
Posts: 2,904
Look carefully at the clamping part. It likely has a removable piece that makes it fit a larger cord like yours. I can see it in the picture you posted. It looks like it is under your thumb in the second picture you posted between the white part and the cord.

If it almost fits, but is still tight, squeeze it together with pliers to get the screws started. If it is too tight with the spacer removed, just file the clamp's opening out to where it is a snug fit, but closes all the way. The plastic clamps can be modified without a problem.

BTW, you picked a very good style plug. Good job.
__________________
I only exaggerate enough to compensate for being taken with a grain of salt.
Raspy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ParkLiner fuse box - questions frank_a Electrical | Charging, Systems, Solar and Generators 26 07-31-2014 11:06 AM
Scamp Fuse Box Question Mike-N-Laurie Electrical | Charging, Systems, Solar and Generators 3 07-31-2014 05:24 AM
7 prong trailer plug question. Kevin K Care and Feeding of Molded Fiberglass Trailers 7 09-09-2011 09:33 AM
Four-prong flat to seven round wiring adapter Adam S. Classified Archives 0 07-03-2009 05:05 PM
Fuse Box Wiring HELP PLEASE!! shawnswan Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 10 02-07-2006 04:06 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:46 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, vBulletin Solutions Inc.