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Old 07-11-2021, 06:44 AM   #1
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Name: Sébastien
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Connector

If I have more than 2 wire to connect, what is the best connector ? Marette make a anti-vibration product. Is it a good product ?
Is closed end connector good (ceritified brand) ?
I am good with 2 wire but 3 or more...
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Old 07-11-2021, 07:11 AM   #2
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Connecting WHAT? connecting WHERE?

What works for low voltage inside is light years different from what works outdoors for high voltages.

Give more specifics if you want a good and helpful answer.
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Old 07-11-2021, 12:58 PM   #3
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Last week I had to change my taillight. I had 4 wires to connect. Which connector should I use?
Crimps are perfect for 2 wires. But for 4 ... I have used an anti-vibration Marette for now.
I will change it if necessary.
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Old 07-11-2021, 01:10 PM   #4
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Well thats a little more information. But still not enough to be sure.
I had to look up "anti-vibration Marette." I guess its what we call wire nuts here.
I cant be sure without seeing it (photos would help) but perhaps what you need is a butt connector - one on each wire, preferable with heat shrink sealing.

See:
https://youtu.be/r7GlDBge_WU?t=41

By the way, for anyone else reading this.. the above video is very good and covers a number of things that you should know for proper crimping which are often left out or ignored in other guides and instructional videos.
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Old 07-11-2021, 02:37 PM   #5
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Name: Sébastien
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Thanks for your answer and the video but I don't have an answer to my question.

A link for Marette anti-vibration.
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00K9Y1F10/...K5D3G0PXW5E8VX

I want to know how to join more than 2 wires.
I have 4 wires (ground) to joint together. I can't really use crimp connector for that.
Behind each light, I have at least 3 wires to joint.
There has to be a better way to do it right.
I put a photo of the wires before redoing it. Is the previous connector is good ?
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Old 07-11-2021, 03:21 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebas View Post
...
I have 4 wires (ground) to joint together....
OK Now I think that I understand. A photo helps a lot when there is a language barrier!
To connect more than 2 or 3 ground wires together in a camper I would often use a buss bar but this might not work so well in the space you have:


Another option is a tap like this.. you have one main or primary ground wire and attach the other wires along its length. But this method is less reliable and you need to be sure to use the right size to puncture the insulation but not cut the wire:



Here is another version of the same thing where the attaching wire comes out parallel (beside of) - the main ground wire:


Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebas View Post
...
I put a photo of the wires before redoing it. Is the previous connector is good ?
I would say that what you had is OK and easier to do it that way. You just need to be sure that the wire nut or whatever is used is the proper size for the total amount of wire. In other words the connecter might be specified to hold three 14 gauge wires, or four 18 gauge, or two 10 gauge. But I just made those numbers up in my head.. so check the specifications.

EDIT: I think what you had originally were crimped on. Crimp is good because it is mechanically secure. Scamp uses regular wire nuts which look similar but are not crimped.. they twist on. They are not as secure. The Marrette set screw wire nuts look good and perhaps are more than you need. But I am confused because the spec sheet I found lists a wire size (18-12 gauge) but does not say how many wires you can use at the same time on the same nut. Probably if you can get the wires to go in without forcing them and then tighten the screw, it will be fine.
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Old 07-11-2021, 07:36 PM   #7
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I found this. I used it for 3 wires. Too small for 4 wires.
No spec for it utilisation. I suppose if the wired fit, it will work.
Thank, you really help me.
Seb
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Old 07-11-2021, 07:58 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sebas View Post
I found this. I used it for 3 wires. Too small for 4 wires.
No spec for it utilisation. I suppose if the wired fit, it will work.
Thank, you really help me.
Seb
Yes if properly crimped whose should work well.
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Old 07-12-2021, 06:51 AM   #9
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I must say that I've been impressed with the closed end crimp connectors used throughout the original wiring of my Trillium 4500 in 1978. 43 years later and still no problems with these closed end crimp connectors! (I recently sold the Trillium.)
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Old 07-18-2021, 02:36 PM   #10
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you can get different sizes of the closed end connector, solder the wires first then crimp, and you will never have a problem
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Old 07-18-2021, 02:59 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Joe MacDonald View Post
you can get different sizes of the closed end connector, solder the wires first then crimp, and you will never have a problem
I believe the consensus of opinion and instruction from people in the field is that stranded wires should not be soldered before using a crimp connector. The set screw connector might be fine.. seems to be it would. But with crimp connectors the individual strands solidify and take the shape of the inside of the connector when crimped, and soldering them first would retard the creation of that contact. At best, the connection would be no better and there is a good chance it will be worse. Plus, with any soldered connection on stranded wires, it should be well secured to prevent movement. If I am wrong please cite some authority for me to review.
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Old 07-18-2021, 03:08 PM   #12
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I crimp, then solder, then shrinkwrap.

Call me crazy, but I like the results.
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Old 07-18-2021, 04:20 PM   #13
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My reason for crimping was simply to cover the ends, if soldered. I also fill with dielectric grease before crimping over solder to prevent corrosion, just my way of doing it, no authority here
Joe
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Old 07-18-2021, 06:55 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanKilian View Post
I crimp, then solder, then shrinkwrap.

Call me crazy, but I like the results.
Crimp, solder, dielectric grease, shrink wrap. Overkill, but I am a man of extremes. I have yet to locate a good source of bare but splice crimps. That would be easier then stripping the ones I use now.

I have seen too many original Trillium crimp connections corrode the wire some distance under the wire insulation. I wonder if that is the result of the dissimilar metals between the metal of the crimp and the copper in the wire.

I am horified by the Scotchlok style connectors in post #6, (sorry Gordon2). I think of those as ticking time bombs.
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Old 07-18-2021, 11:15 PM   #15
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You coul always break out the soldering gun or soldering iron and some good 3M or plymouth tape.
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Old 07-19-2021, 05:10 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
.... I have yet to locate a good source of bare but splice crimps. That would be easier then stripping the ones I use now.
Its "Butt", not "But".
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Tilston View Post
....
I am horified (sic) by the Scotchlok style connectors in post #6, (sorry Gordon2). I think of those as ticking time bombs.
I did not endorse their use. In fact I specially said that they are "less reliable and you need to be sure to use the right size to puncture the insulation but not cut the wire." I agree that they are not the best option.
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Old 07-19-2021, 07:23 AM   #17
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WAGO connectors (the link is for a 5 pole version) are a good way to connect multiple wires. They are available in a number of configurations. I'd stick with the WAGO brand. You can also purchase an assortment.

There are many imitators, some have had bad reviews.

Some advantages - they are reusable, fit a wide range of wire sizes, and I haven't had a failure yet. Disadvantages are size & cost.
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Old 07-19-2021, 02:50 PM   #18
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I am a tin and crimp guy myself and I know all about the wires breaking Blah, blah blah, but I have been doing this for a lot of years and no problems.
If you have the wires flexing and blowing in the wind you already have screwed up...
When I install high current terminals I often tin, crimp and then flow solder to fill the gaps.
Here we are talking relatively small currents etc and not serious fault currents and lightening strikes where solder will meld and blow out. For that type of connect there is an entirely different set of conditions.
Multi wire connections I often use slightly oversized butt connectors and twist the wires and insert, treating them like I would a single wire.
The best butt splices are those made by Thomas & Betts that actually crimp the wire and have a second larger sleeve that crimps the insulation to keep the wore from flexing at the crimp junction, but those are like GOLD and are not necessary for us.
I also like the heat shrink butt splices that have a little heat activated sealant that also immobilizes the wire and seals out moisture.
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Old 07-21-2021, 10:53 AM   #19
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Name: Delmer
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Connector

Hello,
I have used “posi-loc” & “posi-tap” to join 2 wires together. Work exceptionally well. Never had one fail. Soldering is still the best for most connections.
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Old 07-21-2021, 08:48 PM   #20
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Auto mechanic here, 40 years dealing with lots of electrical problems in vehicles. I have to comment on gordon2 recommending the splice tap connectors,scotch lock taps. They work in an emergency, but too often will cause more problems than they are worth. They don't seal and with any kind of weather exposure within months your wiring will be full of corrosion and high resistance. In the auto trade we call it the green death.
I cannot remember how many times I have had to cut out scotch lock taps and splice in new wiring to repair lights and tow plugs.
I always use the crimp and shrink connectors where ever any kind of moisture or weather exposure is possible. Even better are the GM Weatherpac or the Duesch brands of connectors and terminals. A bit pricy and you need special crimpers for the terminals, but you will never have to worry about moisture or corrosion in wiring connectors.
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