Help setting up a 76 Boler for dry camping/boondocking - Fiberglass RV


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-09-2021, 06:29 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Name: Kate
Trailer: Boler
BC
Posts: 10
Help setting up a 76 Boler for dry camping/boondocking

Hi there,


Just bought a 12v deep cycle battery for my new boler and noticed that it only powers two lights and everything else looks connected to a shore power input.

I would love to be able to dry camp/boondock with my boler so I need the battery to be able to power the fridge as well as do things like charge my phone.

In a perfect world, the whole thing would be able to run off a shore power plug if I were to go to a campground or rv site, or be able to run completely off battery power if dry camping.

Does anyone have any schematics or advice on how to set up a proper wiring system that can run off a battery or a plug in? (I'm handy but a complete beginner when it comes to electrical). Do i need to buy equipment like a converter to make it all work?

Best,
Kate
KNickels is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2021, 07:41 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,883
Registry
Hi Kate, congratulations on your new Boler! Based on the year, I am guessing it is a 13 foot. If it has the original fridge, that fridge is designed to work on propane when off grid, and electric when plugged into shore power. Also, again if its the original fridge, no electricity is required to run the fridge in propane mode.

For a 1976 Boler 13,

- If you are mainly using the trailer off grid, don't bother with a converter, just install a smart charger to re-charge your battery when shore power is available. You might also consider adding a solar panel (probably portable) and solar charge controller. Also, I would strongly recommend switching all of your interior 12 volt bulbs to LED which use one-tenth the power of incandescents.
- If you are mainly using the trailer with shore power, install a converter only if your 12 volt dc needs are greater than a 5 or 10 amps, otherwise just install a smart charger to re-charge your battery. EDIT: On shore power, run the fridge in 110 vac mode. Thus you WILL need a 110 vac distribution panel and a 12 vdc fuse panel.

Here is a Scamp 13 wiring diagram for trailer loaded with options (couldn't find Boler 13 wiring diagram):

https://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/...?do=file&id=75
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2021, 07:42 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 10,221
Registry
If the fridge is original or a like replacement, it can run off propane, no electricity required. USB charging ports are pretty easy to add. If that- plus lights- is really all you need to power, a small portable solar panel would suffice to top off your battery. .

However, if your fridge only runs on 12V, or if you want to run other household appliances from your battery, then you will need some significant upgrades to your system, perhaps a second battery, a roof-mounted solar panel(s), and maybe an inverter.

Either way, one upgrade often worth doing in a vintage trailer is replacing a older power center with an up-to-date one. A modern 12V power center typically includes a converter, a multi-stage battery charger, and several fused 12V circuits.

Just to clarify… A converter changes 110VAC to 12VDC when you’re plugged in to run lights and charge your battery. An inverter (less common in small trailers) changes 12VDC to 110VAC to run household appliances when you’re not plugged in.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2021, 08:10 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
Borden's Avatar
 
Name: Borden and Carole
Trailer: 1978 Earlton Ontario boler
Ontario
Posts: 1,373
Registry
Our fridge sucks back so much 12v that 12v is only good for travel between sites. Propane does not work while traveling; so we get it cold and then use 12v.
We use propane if no power, 110v if available at site.
Purchased a deep cycle marine/RV battery and had to upgrade to a m31 gelpack, price hurt but lasts many times longer. Prepare for sticker shock but battery is worth the price.

Want to add the light weight flexible solar cell sheet between caps to help.

Most northern Ontario provincial campgrounds have no power and Federal sites lack power as well.

Good news they usually have potable water and dump stations.

Just some notes from our camping times.

Hope this helps
Borden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2021, 08:31 PM   #5
Senior Member
 
Borden's Avatar
 
Name: Borden and Carole
Trailer: 1978 Earlton Ontario boler
Ontario
Posts: 1,373
Registry
Boondocking

Our definition of boondocking
1/ no water or power
2/ find a campable spot that is possible
3/ Go to rangers office and say how long want to stay and give GPS location
4/ never walk alone
5/ be prepared for wild animals
6/ take out what you take in
7/ full propane tanks, full battery and water tank
8/ Grey and black empty
9/ blankets and emergency supplies
10/ most important have fun

Make a survival kit with compass, map and plan.

One time up north we could have had a tragedy, lost my brother. Went to rangers station, found out they had a ranger lost for two weeks! He remembered what he was taught prior and it worked out.
P.S. they found the missing ranger the next day
Was a great trip.
Borden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2021, 11:18 PM   #6
Member
 
Name: Diane
Trailer: Scamp 13
Wisconsin
Posts: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Borden View Post
4/ never walk alone
.
Why?
sunnyone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-05-2021, 07:49 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
Name: bill
Trailer: 2013 Escape 19; 1977 Trillium 1300
The Mountains of North Carolina
Posts: 3,831
Registry
Add to #1 above no bathroom facilities: no shower, no toilet.

I routinely "dry camp". The main difference is dry camping typically has bathroom facilities (could just be an outhouse), but not always a shower. Example is Walmart overnight, forest service CGs, and many national parks.

To effectively boondock you need all interior lights to be 12V LED, ample solar, ample battery capacity, on board water. Modern compressor truck fridge or old style fridge that can be run on just propane.
thrifty bill is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2021, 06:30 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Alex Adams's Avatar
 
Name: Alexander
Trailer: 1979 Boler B1300
New Hampshire
Posts: 993
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyone View Post
Why?
Step in gopher hole, break ankle, stuck in wilderness with friends, rangers and others searching.
Alex Adams is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2021, 07:01 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
John in Michigan's Avatar
 
Name: John
Trailer: 1979 Boler 1700
Michigan
Posts: 1,883
Registry
KNickels what are your thoughts?

Not sure where the original poster went, but this is a relevant question for many of us. The "power converter" is a handy solution that typically incorporates not only a 110 VAC to 12 VDC converter, but also a 110 VAC breaker panel, a 12 VDC fuse panel AND a battery charger. Simpler alternative might be to install a 110 VAC breaker panel, a 12 VDC fuse panel and a battery charger, thus no 110 VAC to 12 VDC converter.

Next week we will be camping off grid in a National Forest Service camp site. Not a campground, there are 100 sites spread out over 50 miles along a river. Some of the sites are close to an outhouse, others are miles from an outhouse. Our particular site is close to an outhouse. We'll be showering occasionally in our 40 year old wet bath. Heavy tree cover, so we won't be relying much on solar power. We are taking two fully charged LiFePo4 batteries, powering LED lights, a fan and charging accessories, running the fridge on propane.
John in Michigan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-08-2021, 07:42 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
Jon in AZ's Avatar
 
Name: Jon
Trailer: 2008 Scamp 13 S1
Arizona
Posts: 10,221
Registry
Never hike alone? Not everyone has a ready partner. Not everyone finds group hikes with strangers appealing. There can be safety in numbers, but sometimes there is only false security and accompanying stupidity. Plenty of rescues involve poorly planned group hikes.

Solo hikers do take an extra risk, but it can be managed and many find it worth taking. Let someone know where you are going and when you will be back. Use trail logs when provided, and don’t forget to sign out when you leave the area. Stick to your planned route, carry basic survival equipment, and enjoy the solitude.
Jon in AZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
boler, boondocking, dry camping


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
CPAP machine & Boondocking/Dry Camping Adrian W General Chat 10 05-02-2016 11:57 AM
Not seeking a dry county but we are now dry BatDude Problem Solving | Owners Helping Owners 6 12-24-2015 03:48 PM
Dry Camping -- Microwave Popcorn Legacy Posts Camp Cooking, Food & Recipes 24 07-03-2003 11:04 AM
Dry camping spots Legacy Posts Rallies, Get-togethers, Molded Meets (Archive) 6 05-23-2003 11:10 AM
Dry camping ideas Legacy Posts General Chat 2 05-20-2003 10:02 PM

» Upcoming Events
No events scheduled in
the next 465 days.
» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:07 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions Inc.