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-   -   Nest Caravans — Building a new FG trailer, step by step (https://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f51/nest-caravans-building-a-new-fg-trailer-step-by-step-63317.html)

carlkeigley 10-04-2014 04:20 PM

This is really a great thread Robert.
Thanks for letting us in to your real time world.
And a real time weight will be something other
than offered by most.

Great job.

Robert Johans 10-11-2014 05:30 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Been busy trimming and cleaning up the first two shell parts — adding the necessary prep to facilitate assembly.

Also, testing our suspension parts for fit on the actual shell. The Flexride axle has been tacked to our custom mounting brackets, and bolts are temporarily positioned through the brackets and through the shell.

The Flexride, with adjustable torsion arms, was shipped with a pre-set 22° down angle. With no load on the mounted wheel/tire assembly, you can see we now have about 5" of space between the top of tire and wheel well. Of course, under the full load of an assembled trailer, the torsion arm will compress. When the time comes to dial-in our ride height, we will adjust the torsion arms accordingly.

BTW, special shout out to forum member, Brian BP, for his idea on improving the design of our mounting brackets. We're taking his advice. Thanks, Brian!

Robert Johans 10-11-2014 05:44 PM

1 Attachment(s)
More problems to solve... How to mount the spare tire.

The full size spare fits below the front nosecone storage box and between the towing delta frame arms. About a third of the spare crosses over into recess area built into the floor of the lower shell.

Frankly, we've not yet decided on the most elegant mounting solution. This shot shows a test — "roughing in" some metal to act as a custom bracket to keep the spare tucked up tight.

Hmmm, I'm scratching my head about this one...

Ian G. 10-11-2014 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Robert Johans (Post 486884)
More problems to solve... How to mount the spare tire.

The full size spare fits below the front nosecone storage box and between the towing delta frame arms. About a third of the spare crosses over into recess area built into the floor of the lower shell.

Frankly, we've not yet decided on the most elegant mounting solution. This shot shows a test — "roughing in" some metal to act as a custom bracket to keep the spare tucked up tight.

Hmmm, I'm scratching my head about this one...

Is there any way to attach the spare under the rear of the trailer without compromising ground clearance?
When I designed the frame for my Boler I integrated bracing for the spare tire to mount under the rear but of course the Boler has the stepped frame which provides more clearance.

cpaharley2008 10-11-2014 08:05 PM

I had several Lance travel trailers with the tongue mount underneath, they attached a hinge on one side and a drop down system that attached on the other side with a slide in locking bolt, similar to those pins that hold the shoes on the tongue jacks bottoms.

carlkeigley 10-11-2014 08:27 PM

Just a thought:
How about a swing arm to allow the spare
to swing out making it easy to get to?

If it doesn't clear the tongue there might
be a camber to lower/raise just enough to clear.

Borrego Dave 10-17-2014 09:25 PM

Hey Robert, how about a cable drop down set up for the spare tire like my Ranger uses ? A cable reel would be a bunch lighter than a metal assembly. BTW, this thread is great, thanks for the insite of the build.

Raz 10-18-2014 04:40 AM

I keep my spare inside the trailer, under the permanent bed. There, it is out of the sun and the elements. When I needed it, it was easy to get to and very clean. Raz

Timber Wolf 10-18-2014 07:06 AM

I like the rack you have but think you need something that tightens down and has some adjustment to it. Over the years new tires might be slightly different in diameter or thickness and the spare tire mount should be able to adjust accordingly. You are building a trailer that will outlast all of us, who knows what tires/rims will be used in that time. I am really looking forward to seeing the Nest "standing up".

Terry G 10-18-2014 07:45 AM

Well, if you're ever changing a tire on a dirt road in the rain, you want the spare to be as easily accessible as possible. Sitting on the back wall of my Casita, I like mine just fine. However, the demographic that Nest is attempting to appeal to is very concerned with style and I doubt they will be taking their trailers down many dirt roads.

honda03842 10-18-2014 08:01 AM

In about 100,000 miles, 7 years on the road with small trailers, we've only had the occasion to use our spare once. That time was while driving a new trailer home with too old tires.

In our history flats seem to be rare on the trailer. In my view something that needs to be accessed probably less than once a year doesn't need to be totally convenient.

If the Nest owners are especially well off and 'clean handed' they'll be calling their road service to change it anyway.

My first concern would be that mounting and unmounting the spare should not require unusual strength.

SherryNPaul 10-18-2014 09:21 AM

I read somewhere that over ten per cent of new cars are being sold without a spare tire, not even a "donut," in a move to improve fuel efficiency stats.
My sister-in-law found out the hard way that her daughter's car didn't have one. With a blowout on the interstate, miles from a gas station, all she had in the trunk was a fix-a-leak kit--useless in her situation. Made changing the flat a two-trip process into town.
Sherry

honda03842 10-18-2014 09:30 AM

What brand of car comes without a spare?

Jon Vermilye 10-18-2014 09:33 AM

My 2010 RAV4 Sport. Came with run flat tires, no spare, no "bump" on the back door for adding one. Tires were very expensive, terrible ride & useless in snow. Switched to standard tires & carry a spare on the roof...

Robert Johans 10-18-2014 10:45 AM

For the spare tire mount we are looking into two options: a "cinch tight" swinging bracket, along the lines of the test set-up shown earlier; and a hoist-style, typically seen used under truck beds, and, as I've learned, often used under trailers.

Following up on Norm's comment about the real-world infrequency for a spare tire, as well as its added weight, we did consider not including one. But ultimately decided it better to provide a full-size spare, just in case...

honda03842 10-18-2014 10:58 AM

Robert,

I agree a spare is necessary. There are too many places people travel where there is absolutely no tire source and no supporting traffic.

I do believe it belongs outside the trailer.

Robert Johans 10-18-2014 11:22 AM

4 Attachment(s)
Our very first unit will be the test platform for all of our assembly procedures going forward. A fixture inside the trailer holds the top shell in the exact position, while "cleko" fasteners temporarily cinch the two parts together. (After we've worked out and dialed in the assembly details, these clekos will not be necessary — the shell parts will be bonded together with adhesive and FG/resin.)

While this first test may look a little crude, the process is necessary to discover and resolve any issues.

The rough cut-outs in front and along the sides were made to help maneuver the top shell into position. The last image suggests the location of the windows.

Robert Johans 10-18-2014 11:39 AM

3 Attachment(s)
Again, the Nest body shell is comprised of three major components — top, bottom and rear "cap." And the rear cap includes the entry door. The door is 6' tall and 2' wide. Above the door you can see a recessed area for an combo brake light/ID bar/porch light.

Notice the integrated pockets for the door hinges. No surface-mounted hinges.

Not yet shown are the FG taillight components that will wrap around and mount to both the lower shell and the rear cap.

Steve Outlaw 10-18-2014 11:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by honda03842 (Post 487921)
What brand of car comes without a spare?

Norm, I was curious about that too. A quick Google came up with this list from consumer reports.

Here’s a list of cars we’ve tested that came with an inflator kit instead of a spare tire...

Acura RLX
Audi TT
Buick LaCrosse
Cadillac CTS
Cadillac SRX
Cadillac XTS
Chevrolet Camaro
Chevrolet Malibu
Chevrolet Spark
Chevrolet Volt
Dodge Caliber
Dodge Dart
Fiat 500
Ford C-Max
Ford Focus
Ford Fusion
Ford Mustang
Honda Accord
Hyundai Accent
Hyundai Elantra
Hyundai Sonata
Hyundai Veloster
Infiniti G
Kia Forte
Kia Rio
Kia Soul
Land Rover Range Rover Sport
Mazda MX-5 Miata
Mitsubishi i-MiEV
Nissan Leaf
Porsche 911
Porsche Boxster
Porsche Panamera
Scion iQ
Smart ForTwo
Toyota Prius
Volvo C70
Volvo S60

I find this disturbing. Just a sign of our times, I suppose.

Andrew Gibbens 10-18-2014 12:08 PM

Next you will be trying to tell me that these cars also do not come with starting cranks either....


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