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-   -   FRP Panels, Anyone Use Them for Interior Walls? (https://www.fiberglassrv.com/forums/f55/frp-panels-anyone-use-them-for-interior-walls-71890.html)

SteveV 10-05-2015 10:09 AM

FRP Panels, Anyone Use Them for Interior Walls?
 
I'm getting ready to reseal the windows on my Amerigo & plan on replacing some of the interior paneling around them. The previous owner replaced the paneling around both the front & rear windows with Luan, unfortunately didn't fix the window leaks. I thought about using FRP panels (link to Home Depot fiberglass reinforced plastic: 4 ft. x 8 ft. White .090 FRP Wall Board-MFTF12IXA480009600 - The Home Depot) instead of the wood paneling. Being plastic it should tolerate any moisture better than the wood products available. The white pebble grain finish may not be an interior designers first choice but durability kinda trumps that in my mind.

Has anyone used this during their remodel before & how happy were you with the results? Thanks!

Bob Miller 10-05-2015 10:51 AM

I've used it to rebuild/replace shower walls in slightly larger RV's with good success, but you would have to put up with the problem of the inside of your FGRV looking like a giant bathroom....LOL


And... I think with those kinds of surfaces throughout, that condensation issues would increase.




Jack L 10-05-2015 11:09 AM

Once the leaks are fixed, you can use wood paneling without problems. If you want the look of FRP it would be fine but if you don't fix the leaks, the water will cause mold and dry rot problems.

ckayaker 10-06-2015 10:20 AM

When I redid my leaking windows, I purposely put wooden window mouldings inside. Why? So I could keep track of any window leaks which may show up down the road. I thought about plastic, but it doesn't show the wet as well. I also like the warm look of wood...

David Tilston 10-06-2015 10:41 AM

I think FRP would be perfect for mounting a table to the front of a Trillium.

Hang it off the bottom of the inside, plywood, window frame. Maybe two sheets of it glued together for strength. Then mount a front dinette table to it. No holes in the shell that way.

SteveV 10-06-2015 03:10 PM

Even after resealing the windows with butyl tape I'm guessing the 40+ year windows in this camper won't be 100% watertight whether it be from a wind blown rainstorm or driving thru rain @ 65 mph. I just thought the FRP would withstand the occasional water contact better than wood.

Bob Miller 10-06-2015 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveV (Post 552397)
Even after resealing the windows with butyl tape I'm guessing the 40+ year windows in this camper won't be 100% watertight whether it be from a wind blown rainstorm or driving thru rain @ 65 mph. I just thought the FRP would withstand the occasional water contact better than wood.

The windows in my 42 y.o. Hunter Compact-II did just fine last may in torrential wind and rain in Southern Idaho last May. I put in new tape 3 years ago and cleaned the tracks. Everything else is original.




Larry C Hanson 10-07-2015 07:49 AM

Old Windows
 
Hi,

When I bought this Trillium about 7 years ago I removed
and resealed all the windows. They have not leaked until
this year when the large on on the back dripped a bit.
As an interim fix I scraped just bit (1/8") of the butyl
tape across the top and about an inch down the sides,
masked it off and used the white bathtub calk around that
area. This winter I will remove and reseal the window
properly.

The windows are nearly 40 years old and still do fine in
very heavy rains when the edges are sealed well.

Larry H

Raff 10-07-2015 08:10 AM

I used that as a backsplash in the kitchen area of my Boler rebuild. Easy to work with and looks good. Not sure about a whole trailer full of it though.


Sent from my iPad using Fiberglass RV

cityboy2977 10-08-2015 10:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveV (Post 552397)
Even after resealing the windows with butyl tape I'm guessing the 40+ year windows in this camper won't be 100% watertight whether it be from a wind blown rainstorm or driving thru rain @ 65 mph. I just thought the FRP would withstand the occasional water contact better than wood.

i have used FRP several times. never anywhere but in a bathroom. but it is waterproof forever.
given the selection in HD or Lowes this is what i just replaced a wet closet wall with.

SteveV 10-08-2015 01:45 PM

I appreciate the replies. I had thought of putting the FRP on with the smooth side showing, then either paint or wallpaper it for a finished look. I do like the warmth of the wood tones & I think between the existing cabinets & wood interior panels that this Amerigo has it should have a good balance of different materials. I definitely wouldn't want an all white interior.

Another advantage with the plastic panels would be having the ability to remove and reuse them making possible future repairs a little easier. Very similar to removing a car's door panel & replacing it when repairs have been done.

stevebaz 10-08-2015 02:18 PM

Wood trapped between 2 sides of fiberglass and still getting wet will probably rot faster than on side fiberglass and the other side wood. The wood side will dry out on a small leak rather than trap the moisture in for a longer period and allowing it to do more damage.
If you remove the inner skin and have to replace the wood around the window opening make sure you use a good hardwood. If you can get some Cyprus that would be very good. Hardwoods usually can handle the moisture much better in the long run.


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