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Fred762 01-07-2019 05:04 PM

Trailer skirts??
 
Looking for an easy to use "trailer skirt" to use in cold weather to help keep the Casita underbelly warm and the plumbing functional, while camping in cold weather. Any thoughts? :wub

alan H 01-07-2019 09:05 PM

Try using bales of hay

steve dunham 01-07-2019 09:54 PM

Bales of hay or straw banked up with snow
Both make excellent insulators

thrifty bill 01-08-2019 07:32 AM

Search youtube for Keep your daydream winter camping.

They do a nice recap of skirting and other issues for winter camping.

Jon in AZ 01-08-2019 07:33 AM

I agree straw is best, but it hardly qualifies as ďeasy to use.Ē It would take a couple of pick-up loads. Best for a semi-permanent set-up.

Fred, how do you plan to use this? What kind of cold weather camping are you planning?

Jim Bennett 01-08-2019 08:38 AM

A lot will depend on the temperatures you are in. If you are in temperatures where it rarely warms above freezing during the day, there will be no easy to use solution unless you had a method of pumping heat underneath too. Anything with good insulating value, like the straw mentioned above, is not that easy to use, but fine for a permanent setup. Even with good insulation a bit of heat is needed to keep things from freezing underneath. You might get enough transferring through the floor, but that is not enough in real cold weather.

Fred762 01-08-2019 04:09 PM

straw
 
Naah, we're looking for something to take on and off while camping, moving the TT, etc. straw wd not wrk:(

Donna D. 01-08-2019 05:06 PM

I have a friend that's full-timing in her trailer in Canada. Land of cold and snow. She's not in an all-molded-towable though. She IS a traveler, but will be staying in one place for at least a month. She bought and installed RV skirting from this company. She says they have stellar customer service and they give free estimates:
Trailer Skirting for Your RV by Kimbers Creations

David B. 01-08-2019 07:38 PM

I wonder if several of the light weight swimming pool air mattresses, wedged upon their sides would be a possibility, (you would want a small aircompressor though).
Dave & Paula

Byron Kinnaman 01-08-2019 08:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by David B. (Post 729171)
I wonder if several of the light weight swimming pool air mattresses, wedged upon their sides would be a possibility, (you would want a small aircompressor though).
Dave & Paula


Good thinking outside the box.

There is a problem with your suggestion. The tubes of air are too big to provide any insulation. Good insulation is generally comprised of very small areas of air containment. This prevents eddy currents with transfers heat between each side of the air mattress so that both sides are equally cold.

Borrego Dave 01-09-2019 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman (Post 729181)
There is a problem with your suggestion. The tubes of air are too big to provide any insulation. Good insulation is generally comprised of very small areas of air containment. This prevents eddy currents with transfers heat between each side of the air mattress so that both sides are equally cold.

Might not be much for insulation but would make a contained area on the underside keeping the wind from blowing through. Add a drop light and that may be all that it takes to keep the temp up enough for what the OP is looking for. Sure would be cheap to try out....and roll up small for storage ;).

Byron Kinnaman 01-09-2019 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Borrego Dave (Post 729189)
Might not be much for insulation but would make a contained area on the underside keeping the wind from blowing through. Add a drop light and that may be all that it takes to keep the temp up enough for what the OP is looking for. Sure would be cheap to try out....and roll up small for storage ;).




Keeping the wind out might help. However you can accomplish that with a small roll of 4mil plastic.

Jim Bennett 01-09-2019 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman (Post 729231)
Keeping the wind out might help. However you can accomplish that with a small roll of 4mil plastic.

Any stopping air flow is even more important than insulating, because if the heat easily escapes, the effectiveness of the insulation does not really matter.

Fred762 01-09-2019 03:06 PM

air mattresses
 
Good ideas..the 4 mil plastic sounds good..not take up too much space either..Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm;)

Jon in AZ 01-09-2019 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman (Post 729231)
Keeping the wind out might help. However you can accomplish that with a small roll of 4mil plastic.

Yes, but attaching and supporting it is the problem.

Lil M. 01-09-2019 08:49 PM

How about some foam board insulation...something like this 1"x2'x8'. https://www.lowes.com/pd/R-Tech-Comm...lation/3014678
Can be cut with a knife.

Glenn Baglo 01-09-2019 08:50 PM

I'd put it in a heated garage, myself.

k corbin 01-09-2019 10:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donna D. (Post 729161)
I have a friend that's full-timing in her trailer in Canada. Land of cold and snow. She's not in an all-molded-towable though. She IS a traveler, but will be staying in one place for at least a month. She bought and installed RV skirting from this company. She says they have stellar customer service and they give free estimates:
Trailer Skirting for Your RV by Kimbers Creations

Looks to be a well made product. Watching the video and noting the claim for "exclusive R17" insulation I heard the very distinctive sound of Reflectix when she was installing one of the panels. The double bubble Reflectix claims the upper end of insulation value as being exactly R17. Of course they are also claiming that it reduces the heat in the summer. So yep, must be Reflectix in that sandwich of materials.

I do think it is a very tidy looking product that is easy to remove and put back on and it will certainly block the wind and have longevity of service.

k corbin 01-09-2019 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 729260)
Yes, but attaching and supporting it is the problem.

It could be supported with a frame of pvc pipe. The pipe does not have to be glued together. Slip joints so that it can be disassembled and stored. Stitch rod pockets into tarp fabric rather than using clear plastic. Leaving a flap at the base of the fabric pieces to pile snow or dirt onto it or alternately putting grommets into the flap so that it can be secured down with tent stakes. While it won't be air tight it will block the majority of the wind. To add additional ability to hold it in place you would add more grommets around the top to tie it to the bumpers and axle.

steve dunham 01-09-2019 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k corbin (Post 729289)
It could be supported with a frame of pvc pipe. The pipe does not have to be glued together. Slip joints so that it can be disassembled and stored. Stitch rod pockets into tarp fabric rather than using clear plastic. Leaving a flap at the base of the fabric pieces to pile snow or dirt onto it or alternately putting grommets into the flap so that it can be secured down with tent stakes. While it won't be air tight it will block the majority of the wind. To add additional ability to hold it in place you would add more grommets around the top to tie it to the bumpers and axle.

How do you drive tent stakes into or shovel frozen ground /earth ?
When we camp in the winter we use a dome tent .

Jon in AZ 01-10-2019 07:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 729260)
Yes, but attaching and supporting it is the problem.

Quote:

Originally Posted by k corbin (Post 729289)
It could be supported with a frame of pvc pipe. The pipe does not have to be glued together. Slip joints so that it can be disassembled and stored. Stitch rod pockets into tarp fabric rather than using clear plastic. Leaving a flap at the base of the fabric pieces to pile snow or dirt onto it or alternately putting grommets into the flap so that it can be secured down with tent stakes. While it won't be air tight it will block the majority of the wind. To add additional ability to hold it in place you would add more grommets around the top to tie it to the bumpers and axle.

Quod erat demonstrandum.

Friz 01-16-2019 12:18 PM

No Cost windbreaker
 
I like to sit out in the lawn chairs in the evening. When it's cold and breezy, the wind coming under the trailer is uncomfortable. Here's my windbreak.

Next election, go to the voting site the day after. Gather up 20 or so political signs of the same size. They will be happy to have you pick up the trash.
Remove the wire supports. Measure the circumference of the trailer.
Lay the quantity of signs needed out on a flat surface.
Duct tape every other one of the signs together (sides).
Flip them over, duct tape the remaining ones. This will allow the whole assembly to fold up into a neat stack. Cut out where necessary to clear steps, etc. I only made mine long enough to cover one side of the trailer, since a windbreak was the only purpose, but would help reduce freezing. The whole thing was self supporting when curved around the ends of the trailer.

Cost: $1 worth of duct tape. The corrugated plastic is fun to work with, great for other projects as well. I used 50 of them to cover my roof after a hurricane. They lasted a year.

Byron Kinnaman 01-16-2019 02:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 729260)
Yes, but attaching and supporting it is the problem.




There are numerous ways of attaching.
One is where the rivets are that hold the decorative trim put snaps there then mating snaps in what ever you're using

Tuck the skirting material up under the lip and duct tape it in place.

That just two the possible attaching methods.
If there's snow pile snow on the outside bottom of shirting material.
Or put sand or dirt on it.


Sometimes it pays to think outside the box.

Lisle 01-16-2019 03:34 PM

If using the plastic, you'll need to find a way to secure the bottom. If you're camping in the woods, you might be able to find tree branches to put on the bottom edge of the plastic to keep it from blowing. And putting a light bulb that will generate a little heat may be a good idea. I've used a drop light inside an uninsulated chicken coop to keep the water from freezing even at low temps.

Fred762 01-16-2019 04:45 PM

skirt
 
I may try a redneck solution..4 mil roll of plastic, bricks at bottom and gaffer tape @ the top.

Glenn Baglo 01-16-2019 05:34 PM

Gaffer tape isn't real keen on sticking when it gets wet.

Jon in AZ 01-17-2019 07:10 AM

Trailer skirts??
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Byron Kinnaman (Post 730066)
There are numerous ways of attaching.
One is where the rivets are that hold the decorative trim put snaps there then mating snaps in what ever you're using

Tuck the skirting material up under the lip and duct tape it in place.

That just two the possible attaching methods.

...
Sometimes it pays to think outside the box.

I was specifically referring to the use of thin plastic as the skirting material. I would never attach duck tape to any surface I cared about, and snaps wonít work on thin material. Wind will tear it loose unless itís stretched taut on a framework, which defeats the simple and portable requirement.

A whole line of snaps along the bottom of the trailer in conjunction with vinyl skirting is probably the commercial solution. Not cheap even if you do it yourself, but neat and effective. Might be worth the trouble if you plan to use it a lot.

I love the idea of the old campaign signs! Now thatís my kind of out-of-the-box thinking.

Donna D. 01-17-2019 07:55 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 730148)
I would never attach duck tape to any surface I cared about,...

Ahhhh, but it depends on the Duct Tape. Some, the glue turns to concrete. But, I've used No Residue Duct Tape successfully. Left on my trailer Jan-April and NO residue. Waterproof too. Win-Win

Pierregy 01-17-2019 08:36 AM

Bubble Roll
 
What I saw in British Columbia was something like a Cool Shield Thermal Bubble Roll being used as a skirt on the trailers. The ones that stayed in one place for the winter used snaps to attach it skirt to the trailer. It looked relatively easy to roll for travelling. I'm still a little stuck on (no pun intended) how to attach it for quick removal and attachment on a fibreglass trailer.

Fred762 01-17-2019 09:14 AM

gaffer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo (Post 730089)
Gaffer tape isn't real keen on sticking when it gets wet.

I dunno, but the gaffer tape WE use has been "tested" and seems to work.

ie..I read several posts last year in various forums, telling about some outside shower doors "popping open when a big truck passed going the other way on 2 lane roads"..their shower hoses flipped out and got caught under the L wheel, resulting in expensive repairs needed.

Several responders said they had used different door locks, and several said gaffer tape (white) was their solution. I tried it and it seems to work..a small piece added to the side of the shower door just beside the lock, helps our peace of mind on long hauls.
Easy to apply and easy to remove w/o sticky residue. + it's white and there4 does not show.:)
BTW we use that same gaffer tape to tape 2mil plastic film over all of the various openings when we winterized last November..keeping bugs and dirt daubers OUT of the trailer and refiringerator. I have checked the covers often and so far the gaffer tape is holding..tho it IS under a Casita cover too. It seems to be helping keep out moisture, bks the tub of Damp-Rid we put on the floor is still hardly used up and looks to be good to go till March.

Danmc44 01-17-2019 09:21 AM

Trailer Skirts
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pierregy (Post 730151)
What I saw in British Columbia was something like a Cool Shield Thermal Bubble Roll being used as a skirt on the trailers. The ones that stayed in one place for the winter used snaps to attach it skirt to the trailer. It looked relatively easy to roll for travelling. I'm still a little stuck on (no pun intended) how to attach it for quick removal and attachment on a fibreglass trailer.


Could you use neodymium magnets to attach a skirt to the exposed frame?

These magnets are very powerful. Attach the bubble wrap to a plastic tarp with enough "tail" to use site acquired rocks, sand, logs to hold the skirt to the ground.

Jon in AZ 01-17-2019 01:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Donna D. (Post 730149)
Ahhhh, but it depends on the Duct Tape. Some, the glue turns to concrete. But, I've used No Residue Duct Tape successfully. Left on my trailer Jan-April and NO residue. Waterproof too. Win-Win

Thanks for that, Donna. Based on past experience with duck tape, I was skeptical of such claims, but your experience is encouraging.

Duck tape or duct tape... that is the question!

Glenn Baglo 01-17-2019 02:12 PM

Duck tape was originally made with cotton duck cloth.

Duct tape is made with an aluminum foil.

Donna D. 01-17-2019 02:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo (Post 730204)
Duck tape was originally made with cotton duck cloth.

Duct tape is made with an aluminum foil.

Yeah, then I screwed up the spelling in my post.


It's DUCK Tape... No Residue.


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