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RobertW 06-12-2019 01:46 PM

Things to take and things to leave
 
We just got back from meeting some great people at the Bourbon and Eggs rally (thanks again everyone!) and getting some great advice on trailers. We plan on retiring and full timing in about 1-2 years so weíre still in the planning stages.

In looking at trailers, we found we donít have a clear idea of how much storage space we need because we donít have a list yet of what we need to take. Many things like clothes and cooking gear are obvious but Iíd like to ask those of you who have gone full time or long duration what you took that you never needed and what you didnít take and found you couldnít do without?

Alf S. 06-12-2019 03:20 PM

Things to take and things to leave.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RobertW (Post 745149)
We just got back from meeting some great people at the Bourbon and Eggs rally (thanks again everyone!) and getting some great advice on trailers. We plan on retiring and full timing in about 1-2 years so we’re still in the planning stages.

In looking at trailers, we found we don’t have a clear idea of how much storage space we need because we don’t have a list yet of what we need to take. Many things like clothes and cooking gear are obvious but I’d like to ask those of you who have gone full time or long duration what you took that you never needed and what you didn’t take and found you couldn’t do without?

Hi: RobertW... It's simple. Take pictures, leave foot prints!!! Everyones supply list is different!!!
Alf S. North shore of Lake Erie:wave

k corbin 06-12-2019 05:19 PM

Categorize what you need by tasks and activities.



For instance here is one for on the road repairs


a basic set of tools that has screwdrivers, sockets, adjustable wrench etc.


some repair tape that is exterior rated just in case you get a hole or a leak.

a good LED headlamp


A set of replacement fuses for the tow vehicle and the trailer


extra bulbs for tail lights if you don't have LEDs



Make sure you have the right jacks along for flat tire changes



a length of rope is handy even if just for a temporary clothes line to dry towels or clothing articles


A small tarp can double as an emergency repair patch for a broken window or be used for picnics or hung up with the rope for a temporary shade shelter.


But don't go overboard on repair items, keep them simple, versatile, compact and light weight.

David B. 06-12-2019 06:50 PM

Robert, we have found that having storage available in your tow vehicle works best. We keep cold weather clothing in plastic storage containers in the back of the covered truck bed, and switch out with summer clothes when needed from the trailer. Some use a van as a tow vehicle, but just donít go to small.
Best of luck with your personalized set-up.
Dave & Paula

CPW 06-12-2019 09:57 PM

Honestly, Robert, find the trailer with the layout you like best. Purchase it. Make a list of all the things you think you might need, and purchase what you don’t have. Try to organize it efficiently in the storage space available in the trailer. If you cannot fit it all in, try to fit it into the tow vehicle. Once it is all organized, pat yourself on the back. But make it a small pat, because you will find what you think you need and what you actually need will evolve for some time. But eventually, with perseverance and some trial and error, you will figure out what works for YOU, because you are unique and what might work for someone else might not work for you. Four years into my current trailer and it pretty much meets my wants and needs. But upon reaching that point, you will still make the occasional tweak, because wants, needs, and priorities change. For example, the slow cooker you love to use might be replaced with an more versatile InstaPot. Sooner or later, the end result will be close to perfect but it is doubtful it will ever be absolute perfection. You will likely continue to make changes, improve efficiency, etc. as long as you are RVing.

Borrego Dave 06-12-2019 11:02 PM

+ 10 on Carl's comments.

John in Santa Cruz 06-13-2019 01:42 AM

Today, I just unloaded 6-8 carry bags of my wife's clothes and stuff that spent the entire 3 weeks of our recent Utah trip jammed in the back seat of our extended cab F250.

just sayin'

Borrego Dave 06-13-2019 02:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John in Santa Cruz (Post 745229)
Today, I just unloaded 6-8 carry bags of my wife's clothes and stuff that spent the entire 3 weeks of our recent Utah trip jammed in the back seat of our extended cab F250. just sayin'

OK John, I've just got to ask....were any of those bags used or did they just take a trip ;).

John in Santa Cruz 06-13-2019 02:45 AM

afaik, they just took the ride. but I too brought several jackets I never wore, as we tried to prepare for everything from freezing rain to baking sun.

we ended up doing laundry twice on our trip, first at our son's house in Reno where we overnighted after the Strawberry Music Festival, then again in Kodachrome Basin SP. that left us with plenty of clothes for the last leg and return. We had full hookups at Strawberry, were dry but there was a full dump station at KC Basin SP, ,and Dead Horse Point SP had electrical without water/sewer hookups but had a dump on the way out, without water refill. We refilled our water tank at a Love's on I40 to cover til we got home.

Jim Bennett 06-13-2019 09:12 AM

Coming from a backcountry adventure life to trailer camping, I bring along very little clothes but have never had and issue with this, after all I am camping and that great pair of shorts pants can work for many days. Even my wife is getting better, realizing just a couple jackets is good enough.

We need to leave room for the fun stuff. :)

Gordon in Idaho 06-13-2019 09:15 AM

Once you have found the right trailer (you may not have infinite choices), take a short shake down trip, or a stay in your driveway, and make a list. Pencil and paper may be your best tools to start with.


Gordon

ZachO 06-13-2019 09:33 AM

1 Attachment(s)
My trailer has a lot of storage, plus the bed of my truck, so I can fit a lot. I make all sorts of compromises, but basically I take it all! I just try to buy only compact stuff.

The above responses are great. Start out with what you think you need and will fit, then adapt as you learn what you really need vs what fits.

I think it depends on the person, but in general I agree that buying the trailer that feels most comfortable to you, then fitting what you can is a better approach than figuring out how much crap you think you need and buying a trailer that has enough storage for that crap. You'll end up with one of those ginormous 5th wheels, with another full storage trailer behind it! Or this:

Attachment 129833

Whatever space I have, within reason, I seem to expand or contract to fit.

Wayne Collins 06-13-2019 10:01 AM

Take half as many clothes than you think you will need,
And twice as much money.

Jim Bennett 06-13-2019 02:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gordon in Idaho (Post 745260)
Once you have found the right trailer (you may not have infinite choices), take a short shake down trip, or a stay in your driveway, and make a list. Pencil and paper may be your best tools to start with.


Gordon

This is good advice as everyone camps differently, and other than absolutely needed items, they tend to vary in activities and desires.

After each trip reevaluate what you have brought, you may find items you really don't need and others you feel would be nice.

At least once a year go through every item in your trailer and reevaluate. You will likely find a fair few items that you really don't need that you thought you did. I certainly have a few times now.

Bringing a credit card or the cash to buy the odd item you had not brought and possibly never even thought about would be good.

At first using a good setup and tear down to do list is a great thing to follow. We never do this ourselves now that we are very adept at the process and know what to look for. We actually each do a walk around and in the trailer before leaving to be sure.

Jim Bennett 06-13-2019 02:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wayne Collins (Post 745265)
Take half as many clothes than you think you will need,
And twice as much money.

Lots of places where no clothes are needed as well. :D

But on the note of clothes you are correct. Folks generally bring more than needed. I don't, I bring enough to stretch out to near two weeks if washing is not available. A pair of pants will do me many days if not badly dirtied.

honda03842 06-13-2019 03:38 PM

Packing
 
Less is Best, it becomes a simpler life.

We've traveled for 10 years, 7-8 months a year, in a Scamp 16 or Scamp like trailer. This is a frenetic response, off the cuff but will give you a general view.

Of course like many we started in a bigger rig, actually a motorhome. We downsized to a small trailer "just" so we could drive across Labrador, not planning to keep that "too little???" trailer. We ended the trip by saying, boy that was easy, continuing on completing an 8 month loop of the USA, and finally coming home and sold the motorhome.

We are now on our 8th loop of the USA, having spending over 4000 nights on the road in our 19 years. Really a great life. We've learned you don't need a lot to see North America.

We have never felt we needed more space, totally satisfied by the space available.

As to clothes, you enter a different world with extended traveling. You can happily get by with less. You don't need different outfits every day. Our view is you need 7 days worth of clothes, our wash interval. We don't carry seasonal clothing. We simply layer for weather. We do not consider our tow vehicle a closet. We do keep a sweater, a rain coat and the like to put on when out hiking. If the weather gets cool we wear 5 layers. We don't iron, the wrinkled look works just fine. We carry one dress outfit, for church or special outings.

Our University age grandkids manage Europe from a backpack.

The most used tool I carry is my Leatherman, used daily and now 19 years old.
We do carry other tools but find they are rarely used, generally for the little emergency. We do carry a small compressor, a bottle jack, a socket set, a tire repair kit and .... The compressor is used about monthly depending on route.

We minimize pots and pans, glasses, plates and dishes (typically 4 of each) 99 percent of the time it's just the two of us. Crock pot is handy. (As well our kitchen table is designed for 2.)

We don't have a microwave, space is too valuable and a stove can do anything a microwave can do. We eat in our rig about twice a day.

We carry 5 or so spices. Learned to live without ice.

We carry four large towels, two normal bath and two beach towels (They do double duty serving as back up to bath towels and are normally in the tow vehicle).

We carry two sets of sheets, 2 pillows. We minimize footwear. The only exception is sneakers and Pickleball rackets to allow us to play on the road.

We have no hanging clothes. Everything is folded and organized. Any closet has been converted to shelves, all under space like under the dinette has been converted to draws or pull out bins.

Of course we have the rule if you don't use it don't bring it next time.

Glenn Baglo 06-13-2019 03:39 PM

Anything you decide you don't need can be stored in Jim Norman's garage. :loltu

Jim Bennett 06-13-2019 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo (Post 745293)
Anything you decide you don't need can be stored in Jim Norman's garage. :loltu

Are you sure about this? I thought spare junk was stored in his basement. ;)

k corbin 06-14-2019 03:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by John in Santa Cruz (Post 745229)
Today, I just unloaded 6-8 carry bags of my wife's clothes and stuff that spent the entire 3 weeks of our recent Utah trip jammed in the back seat of our extended cab F250.

just sayin'

No doubt your wife has plenty to say about what you take along but fortunately for you she is not going online and posting it publicly.

CPW 06-14-2019 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo (Post 745293)
Anything you decide you don't need can be stored in Jim Norman's garage. :loltu

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Bennett (Post 745296)
Are you sure about this? I thought spare junk was stored in his basement. ;)

Perhaps when Jim decides to change trailers again (likely within a year) rather than selling his 21 (Deja View) he can gut it and turn it into a ďfiberglass storage facilityĒ for other FGRV owners. With the rental fees he collects he can finance his future Escapes!:D


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