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AdamNH 12-17-2019 09:32 AM

Camp stove recommendations
 
I'm thinking about a last minute gift for my wife. We are new to Scamping and when we tent camp we always have gone in groups and someone else has brought the stove. So I think we need a new propane camp stove to use outside. I suspect we'll do all of our cooking outside when the weather is nice. I'm thinking a basic 2 burner setup but open to suggestions.

There appear to be tons of options available. The only one I'm familiar with is a basic green Colman unit that we've used that is difficult to light and has very little burner modulation. It basically on "high" or "super high" all the time. When you try to turn it down a little bit it goes out.

Its very difficult to see the difference between 2 units online. For example, LL Bean has a "Camp Chef Everest" and "Camp Chef Teton" and they look very similar but one costs twice as much as the other!

I don't mind spending a lot of money on something high quality that will last. I'd rather buy once cry once, but also don't need to go crazy with features. I just want something high quality that works well and will last a long time. Any tips on models that can stow easily in a Scamp 16 would also help, or do most people carry them in their TV?

So what stoves do people like?

Jon in AZ 12-17-2019 10:15 AM

I love my Coleman and have had it 30+ years. It was one of the first with piezoelectric ignition, which I find very convenient. The ignitor recently stopped working on one burner, but has otherwise worked flawlessly for three decades.

I do agree that low simmer is hard on a Coleman, but our style of camp cooking does not require much long simmering on low.

I like that I can use the 1# cylinders for portable convenience, or connect to a bulk tank for economy when we’re camping in one spot for a while.

Bob & Jackie C 12-17-2019 10:28 AM

Camp Stove
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 762969)
I love my Coleman and have had it 30+ years. It has electronic ignition, which I find very convenient. The electronic ignition recently stopped working on one burner, but worked flawlessly for most of the 30 years.

I do agree that low simmer is hard on a Coleman, but our style of camp cooking does not require much long simmering on low.

I like that I can use the 1# cylinders for portable convenience, or connect to a bulk tank for economy when weíre camping in one spot for a while.

Yes, Coleman all the way, easy to use and lots of parts available. Been using our's for years with little problems.

nigeleccleston 12-17-2019 10:30 AM

I highly recommend this stove from Stansport. https://www.stansport.com/outfitter-...ve-blue-212-50
I researched for a stove that could provide low simmering heat. It works well.

Casita Greg 12-17-2019 10:32 AM

I'll take a Camp Chef stove over any Coleman ever made. I have a single, double, and I had a triple burner one also, but my youngest son now has that one as it is now too big for just the two of us. I have one of these (below) that I mainly use, and I also have the optional Barbeque Box and Flat top Griddle. Best stove out there for the money IMO.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/to...7038_200317038

Thom Rowland 12-17-2019 10:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 762969)
I love my Coleman and have had it 30+ years. It has electronic ignition, which I find very convenient. The electronic ignition recently stopped working on one burner, but worked flawlessly for most of the 30 years.

I do agree that low simmer is hard on a Coleman, but our style of camp cooking does not require much long simmering on low.

I like that I can use the 1# cylinders for portable convenience, or connect to a bulk tank for economy when weíre camping in one spot for a while.



I bought my Coleman Propane Stove in 1977 for tent camping and I am using it when camping in my Scamp. I don't know much about the new ones but my old one has lasted a long time.

AC0GV 12-17-2019 10:53 AM

BTUs
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by AdamNH (Post 762965)

Its very difficult to see the difference between 2 units online. For example, LL Bean has a "Camp Chef Everest" and "Camp Chef Teton" and they look very similar but one costs twice as much as the other!

Camp Chef Teton stove is powered by two 10,000 BTU burners while the Everest stove can crank out 20,000 BTUs from each of its burners.

AdamNH 12-17-2019 10:54 AM

Lots of love for the Coleman and it is certainly the standard bearer. Auto ignition would certainly improve it, but I think I'll be looking for something else. Also, my guess is that the Coleman stove of today is probably lesser quality than what was sold in 1977.

That Camp Chef stove that Casita Greg listed looks great and seems like a nice option, but I'm worried that its too big and heavy to cart around and will take up too much room. I think that I'll probably stick with the suitcase style units. The Champ Chefs seem to score well in a couple review roundups that I just read though.

This Jetboil unit is cool and compact and it would be easy to store. But its very expensive and it doesn't appear to have any wind protection.

https://jetboil.johnsonoutdoors.com/...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

Doug in Sacramento 12-17-2019 11:06 AM

We us a Camp Chef Summit, a two burner stove. It works great.

Jon Vermilye 12-17-2019 11:07 AM

For what it is worth, I now carry a Weber Q 1000 grill & an inexpensive single burner butane stove. Previously, I carried a Coleman Stove/Grill, and while it worked, the grill was no where near as nice as the Weber.

bobblangley 12-17-2019 11:14 AM

While I am sure there are better stoves out there, I have found the Coleman propane stove to perform admirably for years. It is small and compact and very easy to set up.

The propane cartridges can get expensive and are, I hear, not supposed to be put into the waste stream. So, I recommend a 1 gallon propane tank; mine is small and has two hoses so I can also run a weber propane barbecue off of it as well. The combination has worked great for me for years. Sometimes, though, propane suppliers are not all that happy to refill the small tank.

This is equal to 8 of the green propane cannisters and costs about $3 each time it is refilled.

https://www.amazon.com/Worthington-2...764&sr=8-3This

Byron Kinnaman 12-17-2019 12:12 PM

What do I use for cooking outside? At times I will carry my Coleman Fold-N-Go two burner propane stove. Most of the time I carry my MRS Dragon fly single burner white gas stove. Since most of my early days of camping wer out of a backpack The MSR is quite adequate.

Rzrbrn 12-17-2019 12:17 PM

I use a bulk 10 lb tank and a Camp Chef Ranger II Blind Stove. Before you buy anything check it out. It simmers very nicely. It is built like a tank.

Also check out the Cobb charcoal grill, I may get it one of these days. Not soon unfortunately, wife thinks I buy too many camp stoves...

I have had many stoves: Stansport propane (terrible quality), Coleman gasoline (like it), Blackstone Griddle (so so, warped very quickly), Volcano III (marginal but OK), Weber Go Anywhere propane (does not get hot enough especially in the cold and at altitude), Weber 1200 Q (like it, but large and bulky), CADAC (like it but did not last long), and Lodge cast iron charcoal. Think I have forgotten something...

Thinking about getting a PK portable charcoal grill for on the road. Currently use a Weber Go anywhere charcoal. Have a PK 99740 charcoal non portable at home and REALLY like it.

Casita Greg 12-17-2019 12:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AC0GV (Post 762977)
Camp Chef Teton stove is powered by two 10,000 BTU burners while the Everest stove can crank out 20,000 BTUs from each of its burners.

And the Camp Chef Explorer, like the one I have referenced above, has two 30,000 BTU (each) burners. Not always a need but when you really want the heat, you really got it with this one.

Jon in AZ 12-17-2019 01:01 PM

Just remember there are two broad categories of propane camp stoves. One type is designed to run on higher pressure from the 1# cylinders or from a bulk tank using a specialized hose with built-in regulation. The Coleman fits this category, which tends to be lighter and more compact.

The other type runs on lower pressure through a traditional regulator from a bulk tank only. The Camp Chef units are this type. Thanks to lower pressure and larger burners, they have a greater range of adjustability, but they tend to be bulkier.

I have both. We use the Camp Chef when group camping with lots of people sharing the kitchen. We use the Coleman for family trips.

Backpacking stoves are another category. In my opinion white gas makes a lot more sense than propane in that application. It can stand cold temperatures and high altitudes and packs a lot more BTU's in a small space. Have one of those too, but haven't used it for years.

First decision is which type suits your needs. Next decision is budget.

Casita Greg 12-17-2019 01:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 762992)
Thinking about getting a PK portable charcoal grill for on the road. Currently use a Weber Go anywhere charcoal. Have a PK 99740 charcoal non portable at home and REALLY like it.


I have a PK that I use at home, along side my 4 Burner Weber Genesis propane grill. The PK is a really nice grill, (made for use with charcoal, and is not propane compatible,) but sometimes you just can't beat that char broiled steak or those burgers or chicken cooked over charcoal, rather than propane. A charcoal fire will always win that battle for flavor. That said, it's made from cast aluminum, and it's a very thick casting. Being aluminum, it will never rust or corrode, and is truly one of those few things that seem to be made anymore that can actually be handed down to your children and grandchildren. Kind of a future heirloom.

AdamNH 12-17-2019 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 762999)
Just remember there are two broad categories of propane stoves. One type is designed to run on higher pressure from the 1# cylinders or from a bulk tank using a specialized hose with built-in regulation. The Coleman fits this category, which tends to be lighter and more compact.

The other type runs on lower pressure through a traditional regulator from a bulk tank only. The Camp Chef units are this type. Thanks to lower pressure and larger burners, they have a greater range of adjustability, but they tend to be bulkier.


This is great information. Thank you. I didn't realize that there were pressure differences. My Scamp has dual 20lb tanks so my plan would be to use the bulk tank with a hose and regulator. I have a brand new hose that came with the scamp, but I'll have to take a closer look at the regulator to see the pressure. But it would be nice to have the option to use the 1 lb cylinders as well I guess.

At this moment, the Camp Chef Everest looks like a strong contender. Its $140 at LL Bean, but should be $112 with the 20% off deal they have going. Lots of time till camping season so more time to change my mind.

Jon in AZ 12-17-2019 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AdamNH (Post 763003)
But it would be nice to have the option to use the 1 lb cylinders as well I guess.

Our Coleman has a carry case with room for 2 cylinders (case is thirty years old, too!). When weíre just going out for the day, itís very convenient to toss the case in the car without having to carry a bulk tank.

I also like the cylinders for emergency lighting at home with our Coleman propane lantern when the power goes out.

I know theyíre an environmental disaster, and we use bulk tanks most of the time, but I sure like having the option.

herons 12-17-2019 04:06 PM

I've gone through a lot of stoves in my 55+ years of camping. The Camp Chef brand is a clear winner. They are work horses! Purchase a "Y" splitter and a 10-15' hose so you can run it directly off your Scamp propane tank.

Carl V 12-17-2019 04:42 PM

I was looking for a high output stove that didn't require half an hour to boil two cups of water when it's windy.
I went with the Stansport Outfitter, it's got two 25K BTU burners. This thing puts out a LOT of heat. Rather flimsy construction but never had any issue so far after 2 seasons of use, easy to clean, piezo lightning. I LOVE it!

Glenn Baglo 12-17-2019 04:49 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Carl V (Post 763025)
I was looking for a high output stove that didn't require half an hour to boil two cups of water when it'w windy.


This butane burner is much faster than propane. It's used in restaurant industry. Expensive compared to the $26 burners, but worth it, in my opinion.

Bobby Kirk 12-17-2019 05:46 PM

How long have you been married?
Man if I gave my wife a camp stove as a Chrismas gift she would be hitching up the trillium and leaving!......without me.
Ha

charlsara 12-17-2019 05:56 PM

It is hard to beat those cheap butane stoves. Our Coleman stays at home now. To bulky and hard to clean.

Jon in AZ 12-17-2019 06:03 PM

Problem with the butane burners is lack of wind protection. Absolutely essential for outdoor use, in my experience. Guess you could build something, but then it's another piece you have to pack and set up.

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-17-2019 06:14 PM

I ended up going with the Camp chef everrest. I like the fact that each burner is 20,000 BTU

https://www.campchef.com/two-burner-stove-everest.html


Glenn Baglo 12-17-2019 06:16 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jon in AZ (Post 763033)
Problem with the butane burners is lack of wind protection.


Mine has built in wind screen. Burner is sunk down with perforated surround. Seems to work well. I have a cheap butane burner as well. Live in fear of it blowing up, like another I had. Do follow instructions for the size of pan you can use.

Al and Cindy K 12-17-2019 06:31 PM

1 Attachment(s)
As you've seen from the replies, lots of things to consider here. Partner Stoves seem to be the gold standard for propane stoves in the overlanding community https://partnersteel.com/cook-partner I've yet to run across anyone who has worn one of these out but they're definitely spendy.

A few suggestions - Wind wings and/or lid protection on three sides. No protruding knobs or hoses when packed for travel. Burners far enough apart to handle the two largest pots/pans/??? you'll be cooking with at the same time. High enough BTU to boil quickly while adjustable enough to simmer lightly. Easy to clean up after use. Readily available fuel type.

We use an early sixties vintage Coleman two burner (413F) bought at a yard sale when I was in college (67) and a more recent (90's???) 533 Coleman single burner. Both are liquid fuel which I'm comfortable with.

Civilguy 12-17-2019 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AdamNH (Post 763003)
This is great information. Thank you. I didn't realize that there were pressure differences. My Scamp has dual 20lb tanks so my plan would be to use the bulk tank with a hose and regulator. I have a brand new hose that came with the scamp, but I'll have to take a closer look at the regulator to see the pressure. But it would be nice to have the option to use the 1 lb cylinders as well I guess.

At this moment, the Camp Chef Everest looks like a strong contender. Its $140 at LL Bean, but should be $112 with the 20% off deal they have going. Lots of time till camping season so more time to change my mind.

We have an adaptor hose that connects our 11 and 20 lb tanks to LP appliances; stove, lantern, fireplace. The hose connects to the appliance with a thread matching the 1-lb bottles, so the device's regulator is always part of the equation.

We bought a Coleman Gladiator five years ago. It's a bit heavier and bulkier than some of the cheaper stoves, and will handle a bit larger pan. However, I have to use wood shims behind the control knobs in order to get it to maintain a simmer. Otherwise the knob creeps open and quickly increases the heat. I even disassembled the controls and lubricated the O-rings in an effort to cure this, all to no avail. In the end, I don't care for the stove as I really like to be able to simmer on a low heat.

I like the reviews on this site. They are generally well-written and organized. And they never reviewed the Suzuki Samurai. :rolleyes:

https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topic...-camping-stove

Glenn Baglo 12-17-2019 08:13 PM

You can always make a simmer plate out of one of those "camp" toasters that don't work worth a damn. Just remove the wires.

k corbin 12-17-2019 08:38 PM

I think you need to consult with the cook(s) and figure out what it is you want to use it for. There is more than one variety of portable outdoor cooking unit. The majority of the newer camp stoves use piezio electric starters to light the burners. Those electric starters will get worn out after a great many uses but the good companies sell replacement parts for this item. You could even buy a replacement piezio starter part when you purchase the stove and then store it away for a possible future repair part. That is the one part that is most likely to eventually need replacing.

For a single burner stove I have tried several. The hands down winner for quality and safety are the Dual Fuel cooktops by Gas One. For my daily use as a solo traveler I have the mini sized version. For a family you would want the larger size as you can put larger pots on top of it. You can use it with the cans of butane or you can use the included hose and hook it up to green bottle propane cylinders. With an additional adapter you can hook it up to a bulk tank. For portability such as taking it over to a picnic table the green cylinders are terrific. For use inside on the dinette table or countertop I like the butane cylinder as it is compact with the fuel inside of the stove housing. A downside to them is they don't have tall built in sides to block strong winds so you might want to purchase or make an optional surround or use out of doors. This is a link to the larger Gas One portable dual fuel stove. https://gasone.com/collections/just-...ducts/gs-4000p

If I wanted to do grilling as well as having a pot on the stove then I would get a combo unit that has a grill burner as well as a small burner for a pot. I would also want to be sure to have a griddle accessory that fits over the grilling side. That is very useful for cooking pancakes, bacon and eggs for a hearty breakfast (or dinner) or for making grilled cheese sandwiches and such. This one is made by campchef, it is on my own personal list for a potential future purchase but for now I have a charcoal grill with a griddle and a propane/butane cooktop. So no hurry to buy it. https://www.campchef.com/rainier-campers-combo.html
A similar unit is made by Coleman. I have not tried either and there are mixed reviews for both of these.


For a super good 2 burner camp stove that can do nicely controlled slow simmer as well as a high output BTU dual burner cook stove the new GSI Selkirk is a great option. Not too bulky for storing, it is a much thinner profile that older camp stoves of years past. GSI has been in the camping gear business for some time and has a nice variety of products with good features. REI is one of the distributors of their products, it is price though. https://gsioutdoors.com/selkirk-540-camp-stove.html

Of course one high priority for me is that the stove is easy to clean up after use. A second priority is a good support surface for the pots. A badly designed unit has neither of those features but it is a kindness to the person who does the cleanup in a campsite to pay a little extra to have an easy to clean stove. I don't like washing up chores so for me it is a deal breaker if the stove is difficult to clean, low cost is not a bargain price if I have to spend extra time on that chore.

floyd 12-17-2019 08:40 PM

Love my Coleman butane stove, bought at WalMart for twenty bucks.
I did have to buy a case of fuel off the internet though, 'cause WalMart did not seem to reliably stock the fuel.
This thing is hotter than propane which is hotter them natural gas, so it heats up fast and I get several meals from a single can of fuel...
I bought a case of fuel which was not Coleman Brand but which was identical except for the label.





https://s7d1.scene7.com/is/image/Cole...=1000&hei=1000
https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/328...0&odnBg=FFFFFF

Civilguy 12-17-2019 08:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Glenn Baglo (Post 763043)
You can always make a simmer plate out of one of those "camp" toasters that don't work worth a damn. Just remove the wires.

We've done that and it did help somewhat.

However, then you are just burning extra fuel to heat the great outdoors.

Hmmm, sounds like something my Dad would say when we held the door to the house open for just a bit too long... ;)

Bob & Jackie C 12-17-2019 09:36 PM

My experience with butane stoves of any kind is they burn too much fuel and do not work well in the cold or at high altitudes.

Glenn Baglo 12-17-2019 09:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob & Jackie C (Post 763050)
My experience with butane stoves of any kind is they burn too much fuel and do not work well in the cold or at high altitudes.


How is that different than propane?

k corbin 12-17-2019 10:13 PM

This article from MSR research, a camping gear supply company explains the differences in fuels that are used for camping stoves. Of course some of the fuels they are talking about are more typical for use in stoves meant for backpackers who go up into the mountains or out on ski adventures in cold climate conditions. The canister they are using are different than the ones for the typical camping stoves used such as the green bottles or butane cannisters for common single burner stoves that get used for camping and by restaurants. But the discussion regarding the fuel types and their performance under various extremes of conditions is relative information.

Bob and Jackie are correct about their opinion regarding using butane stoves for cold and high altitudes. But of course gas stoves do go through small canisters of fuel much too soon be it propane or butane ;)

https://www.msrgear.com/blog/ins-outs-canister-fuels/

Mike_L 12-17-2019 10:16 PM

Coleman for sure!

Steve Carlson 12-17-2019 10:20 PM

Since I usually like to grill some sort of meat and also heat up a side dish at the same time, the Coleman combo grill/stove works well for me.

Captleemo 12-18-2019 08:48 AM

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01N1RO9WG...-X92-LO-T1R3AT
Here is an add that just popped up from Amazon about a propane/butane camp stove. I don't know anything about it but somebody might be interested.

AdamNH 12-18-2019 09:19 AM

Thanks all for the replies! So many great suggestions. I've never heard of the butane burners before. They are very affordable, but I don't like the idea of having to deal with more canisters. Just one more thing to remember (or forget) and more waste created from the empty canisters. Plus the added cost.

Since our scamp has dual LP tanks, I want something that will work with a bulk tank and an adapter. Might as well use all that fuel that we're towing around. The Camp Chef Everest looks like a good option and its only $95 on Amazon so quite affordable. I'm actually concerned that the 20k burners may be a bit much but hopefully they have decent turndown. I think that on our home range the "fast boil" burner is 20k and I find that it can be a bit much for cooking things like grilled cheese or quesadillas.

The Camp Chef Rainer with the grille seemed nice, but I don't like the aluminum grates. We will probably try to satisfy any grilling needs over the camp fire with a grate that we bring.

By the way, I love the look of that charcoal grille/smoker that was posted. When our webber kettle grille eventually rusts out I'll have to consider one.

Rzrbrn 12-18-2019 10:04 AM

I checked out the Partnersteel stoves; The website does not detail the BTU output of the stoves. I then went on Amazon and found this: Camp Chef Mountaineer Aluminum 2 Burner Camp Stove. This looks like a copycat of the Partnersteel. However, one issue is the special type of hose fitting needed, which Amy also be the issue with the Partnersteel.

One issue I have with stoves like the GSI Selkirk type of design is the restriction to a smaller size pan; with the windscreen in place two pans on the stove is very cramped.

The Ranger Blind II needs a separate wind screen, of which there are many on the market and since the screen is separate it can be moved close it or farther away as needed.

I do like my Coleman Dual Gas stove for cooking at altitudes above 9K feet however.

I won't use the canister butane and small propane bottles because I want to minimize waste.

This coming season I will take the Ranger Blind II, The Coleman gas, and the Weber Go Anywhere charcoal grill.

Also, for when I am hooked up to electricity in a campground I take a 3Q Instant Pot and a small electric griddle. Although I may purchase one of those single burner induction table top to replace the electric griddle. I use Carbon Steel and Cast Iron pans.

It occurs to me I take way too many cooking related implements. Maybe I need to rethink this whole mess. But then I do like to cook...but the real reason is I use cooking as an excuse to limit the distance my wife takes me on hikes to less than 10 mile or so.

Update: The Partnersteel stoves seem to be 10k btu each burner, with good simmer control. The only place to buy are specialty stores.

Nor Cal Mike 12-18-2019 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AdamNH (Post 763073)
Thanks all for the replies! So many great suggestions. I've never heard of the butane burners before. They are very affordable, but I don't like the idea of having to deal with more canisters. Just one more thing to remember (or forget) and more waste created from the empty canisters. Plus the added cost.

I agree about the cannisters. Another peeve for me is that I never really use the end of the bottle because of the fact that it will likely run out of duel while cooking whenever I used to the end. I end up wasting the bottom 25% of the canisters out of fear of cold half cooked scrambled eggs LOL. Instead I purchased an adapter hose that allows me to hook up my Coleman stove directly to a conventional propane tank. That 6 gal tank will run my camp stove and Bbq for over a year.

On the topic of the better of the brands, I prefer my friend's Camp Chef over our Coleman due to it's polished stainless cook top over the Coleman's painted top.The stainless top is totally cleanable vs the burned on stains on the painted surface of my 10 year old Colman. I am not sure if Coleman has switched over to stainless in modern times too. If they have, bravo to them.

floyd 12-18-2019 10:43 AM

It takes literally seconds to switch butane canisters. A full one can be stored in the stove itself. A spare canister takes up less space in storage than an adapter hose for the large propane, and allows the the stove to be placed anywhere that is convenient without a tether.
If I had known about this stove when I ordered my Scamp, I would have likely ordered it without the onboard stove.

ThomasC 12-18-2019 10:46 AM

I have been following this thread and find it very interesting. I am new to RVing and a solo act so maybe I just don't get it. If I need to do something in a pot I will do it in the camper. I do the same thing when barbequing at home. When I think of outside cooking I think of BBQ. I thought I was going to see portable BBQs when this thread started.

When I BBQ at home I have been finding myself putting a cast iron griddle on the Weber all of time. So I have decided to try one of these for a portable grill.

https://www.amazon.com/Blackstone-Ta...s%2C209&sr=8-3

Now I will be all set for burgers hotdogs plus breakfast on the griddle. If you are carrying propane around with you why would you use some other fuel?

DaveMinBako 12-18-2019 11:06 AM

One important feature sometimes overlooked, is a plate around the burners, that covers the inside of the stove. I have a Coleman that has it, and another brand that doesn't. I can promise you that the other brand's base gets far hotter than the Coleman. While you always need to be careful of what's under/around a stove, the difference made by that plate is striking.

Rzrbrn 12-18-2019 11:21 AM

Tom, I have the Blackstone Griddle. It is very heavy. Although I took great care in seasoning it and using the griddle, it still warped. I seldom use it anymore.

"The plate around the burners comment" is very insightful and spot on.

The best stove I ever had was a 3 burner Optimus made in Germany, bought in the US in Washington DC about 1975. I got careless and messed it up, thinking I would just buy a new one. No such luck, they are no longer made. Cream green bottom, sort of a cream mustard top, burner plate perfect burners....sigh...

The Blind II has a diffuser plate under the burners by the way to both deflect the heat and to catch spills.

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-18-2019 12:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AdamNH (Post 763073)
Thanks all for the replies! So many great suggestions. I've never heard of the butane burners before. They are very affordable, but I don't like the idea of having to deal with more canisters. Just one more thing to remember (or forget) and more waste created from the empty canisters. Plus the added cost.

Since our scamp has dual LP tanks, I want something that will work with a bulk tank and an adapter. Might as well use all that fuel that we're towing around. The Camp Chef Everest looks like a good option and its only $95 on Amazon so quite affordable. I'm actually concerned that the 20k burners may be a bit much but hopefully they have decent turndown. I think that on our home range the "fast boil" burner is 20k and I find that it can be a bit much for cooking things like grilled cheese or quesadillas.

The Camp Chef Rainer with the grille seemed nice, but I don't like the aluminum grates. We will probably try to satisfy any grilling needs over the camp fire with a grate that we bring.

By the way, I love the look of that charcoal grille/smoker that was posted. When our webber kettle grille eventually rusts out I'll have to consider one.

Dont worry about the 20k burners they will adjust way down for simmering . whats the best way to attach this stove to the bulk tank?

floyd 12-18-2019 12:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThomasC (Post 763084)
I have been following this thread and find it very interesting. I am new to RVing and a solo act so maybe I just don't get it. If I need to do something in a pot I will do it in the camper. I do the same thing when barbequing at home. When I think of outside cooking I think of BBQ. I thought I was going to see portable BBQs when this thread started.

When I BBQ at home I have been finding myself putting a cast iron griddle on the Weber all of time. So I have decided to try one of these for a portable grill.

https://www.amazon.com/Blackstone-Ta...s%2C209&sr=8-3

Now I will be all set for burgers hotdogs plus breakfast on the griddle. If you are carrying propane around with you why would you use some other fuel?

You make a good point.
Cooking style or what you cook makes a big difference in what stove is best.
My favorite meal to cook with my portable stove is Breakfast, cooked in a single skillet outside at the table on a nice morning.
The Coleman is pretty much ideal for that purpose, but not so great for long cooking times at lower heat, such as making Chilli or pasta.


If shorepower is available, an induction cook plate such as the "NuWave" is great and gaining popularity, it cooks well at all temps and time is no factor. Also it stays cold and can be put away immediately after use and it is smooth for easy cleanup.
I have one but have not taken it on trips yet. I may just take it this year since I have more room but I hope not to completely fill the extra space provided by my new truck.

ThomasC 12-18-2019 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 763088)
Tom, I have the Blackstone Griddle. It is very heavy. Although I took great care in seasoning it and using the griddle, it still warped. I seldom use it anymore.

"The plate around the burners comment" is very insightful and spot on.

The best stove I ever had was a 3 burner Optimus made in Germany, bought in the US in Washington DC about 1975. I got careless and messed it up, thinking I would just buy a new one. No such luck, they are no longer made. Cream green bottom, sort of a cream mustard top, burner plate perfect burners....sigh...

The Blind II has a diffuser plate under the burners by the way to both deflect the heat and to catch spills.


Well I will have to see what happens. If mine warps I will be out eighty bucks. Meanwhile they are getting crazy money for anything Optimus over on eBay so I understand your dismay. Just to drive you crazy there is probably one in a yard sale somewhere for 5 bucks......Tom

PS since you have a 25RQ I appreciate all of your posts.

Rzrbrn 12-18-2019 01:43 PM

Thank you so much for the eBay tip Tom. I went over and enjoyed looking at the Primus stoves for sale. A couple came close to what I had, but no cigar.

Turns out the Primus Ultima 2399 is the one that I had, or close to it. I still think it was marketed a Optimus Primus but maybe I am wrong about that.

I just saw the exact one on eBay but it sold on Nov 9, 2019. Had I known I would have bought it.

I have a Svea 123R that is cherished. It is now called an Optimus Svea.

I also have a Coleman 533 which I have used while camping in the Casita.

Casita Greg 12-18-2019 01:53 PM

I'm sure that they have a following of folks who like them, but IMO, they look like just any other stamped sheet metal run-of-the-mill camp stove. My Camp Chef is built like a tank. Just me...

charlsara 12-18-2019 02:16 PM

Do any of you have a stove that has leveling feet. That is the only problem I have had with either the Coleman propane or the butane burner we use now. I end up sticking spoons or something under it as very few outside tables are level.

AdamNH 12-18-2019 03:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 763076)
One issue I have with stoves like the GSI Selkirk type of design is the restriction to a smaller size pan; with the windscreen in place two pans on the stove is very cramped.

The Ranger Blind II needs a separate wind screen, of which there are many on the market and since the screen is separate it can be moved close it or farther away as needed.

This is a good point about the windscreen being in the way. The Camp Chef stoves seem to have a good following here and are pretty affordable. But I'm torn between the Ranger Blind II and the Everest. Same price at $95 each. The Everest seems more like a classic car camping stove and a bit easier to stow. It looks a bit lighter and more compact as well. So that is the way that I'm leaning right now. I may put this off a couple weeks for a birthday gift so I have time to consider it more.

This is a great forum. I'm impressed to have so many helpful comments and suggestions in only one day. Thank you.

Civilguy 12-18-2019 03:04 PM

1 Attachment(s)
These will level the stove, and can also help adjust the simmer on a Coleman Gladiator!

Or, you could just buy a stove that does a better job of simmering.

Glenn Baglo 12-18-2019 03:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlsara (Post 763130)
Do any of you have a stove that has leveling feet.


Crumple balls of aluminum foil. Use as much as is necessary.

Jon Vermilye 12-18-2019 03:48 PM

At Quartzsite, I just reach down and pick out the right sized rock!

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-18-2019 03:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AdamNH (Post 763139)
This is a good point about the windscreen being in the way. The Camp Chef stoves seem to have a good following here and are pretty affordable. But I'm torn between the Ranger Blind II and the Everest. Same price at $95 each. The Everest seems more like a classic car camping stove and a bit easier to stow. It looks a bit lighter and more compact as well. So that is the way that I'm leaning right now. I may put this off a couple weeks for a birthday gift so I have time to consider it more.

This is a great forum. I'm impressed to have so many helpful comments and suggestions in only one day. Thank you.


The Everest is a high pressure stove runs at 10 PSI
the Ranger Blind II is a low pressure and could be hooked up to the RV lines after the regulator.


I have the Everest. Its great stove even in high wind But i would like to get something That could hook to the low pressure rv quick connect. I wonder how the ranger II would be in the wind?

Civilguy 12-18-2019 04:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWYORKHILLBILLY (Post 763154)
The Everest is a high pressure stove runs at 10 PSI
the Ranger Blind II is a low pressure and could be hooked up to the RV lines after the regulator.


I have the Everest. Its great stove even in high wind But i would like to get something That could hook to the low pressure rv quick connect. I wonder how the ranger II would be in the wind?

I don't understand the mentions of high pressure propane sources in this thread. From the Camp Chef website writeup on the Everest:
"FEATURES
Includes regulator adaptor for a 1 lb. propane cylinder (can be adapted for use with standard bulk tanks"
Consistent with my experience, they are saying my 11 and 20 lb propane cylinders can connect directly to their stove's regulator with an adaptor hose.

Does the trailer regulator (two-stage resulting in some 11 inches of regulated water column pressure) provide too little pressure? :confused:

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-18-2019 04:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Civilguy (Post 763158)
I don't understand the mentions of high pressure propane sources in this thread. From the Camp Chef website writeup on the Everest:
"FEATURES
Includes regulator adaptor for a 1 lb. propane cylinder (can be adapted for use with standard bulk tanks"
Consistent with my experience, they are saying my 11 and 20 lb propane cylinders can connect directly to their stove's regulator with an adaptor hose.

Does the trailer regulator (two-stage resulting in some 11 inches of regulated water column pressure) provide too little pressure? :confused:


Yes they sell a adapter hose with a regulator on one end and other hooks to stove, They sell 2 different hose and regulates. All there mountain series stoves run at 10 PsI . So if you want to hook one of these up you need there regulator ans a bulk tank. The ranger II is low presure running at about .5Psi the same as a rv system. So it can be hooked with a quick connect coupler installed in to Rv propane lines. This way you don't have to carry extra tank. some people prefer carrying a extra tank. I would prefer not to.


so yes the rv system after regualer provides to little of pressure for the everest stove but not the ranger


so this hookup could be used with the ranger

https://www.campchef.com/rv-connection-hose.html




and this one for everest Notice reg at bulk tank

https://www.campchef.com/mountain-se...regulator.html

RogerDat 12-18-2019 04:48 PM

Never liked propane camp stoves, too hot very compact means burner is too close to the pot but... I did find a really nice one burner butane/propane stove to supplement my Coleman white gas two burner.

I think some of it depends on how much room/gear you are willing to devote to cooking, how involved your cooking is. I mostly heat stuff up and make coffee. Real cooking is done on a fire. But I live in a state that seldom has fire restrictions on campfires or charcoal cooking.

Recently bought a tailgate sized table top propane grill for a trip out west where fire restrictions are common. I like it but am sort of starting to feel like fuel and equipment is crowding things a bit on longer trips. Having added an electric skillet and single burner electric hot plate in recent years. Still is nice to have options.

Coleman gets my vote if it is sufficient for ones needs. Parts availability is a plus. I can still get parts of my 1987 stove. You can buy better quality at higher price if one thinks usage and what one needs the stove to do will warrant the weight/space/cost.

Jon in AZ 12-18-2019 06:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Civilguy (Post 763158)
I don't understand the mentions of high pressure propane sources in this thread. From the Camp Chef website writeup on the Everest:
"FEATURES
Includes regulator adaptor for a 1 lb. propane cylinder (can be adapted for use with standard bulk tanks"
Consistent with my experience, they are saying my 11 and 20 lb propane cylinders can connect directly to their stove's regulator with an adaptor hose.

Does the trailer regulator (two-stage resulting in some 11 inches of regulated water column pressure) provide too little pressure? :confused:

I believe the stoves that run on the 1# cylinders require 14" WC to operate correctly, so yes, if you connect one downstream of the trailer regulator it will produce an unacceptably weak flame.

I believe the devices referenced by others are a splitter right at the tank. One side goes to the high pressure (14" WC) appliances and the other goes to the trailer regulator and then to the low pressure (11" WC) appliances. The two different systems have different fittings to make them user-friendly for consumer use.

The "regulator adaptor" in the product description is the in-line regulator for the high pressure device, not an adaptor to connect to the trailer regulator.

My Camp Chef is the low pressure Explorer in your link. I assumed in an earlier post that that's all they make, but I now see they also make portable units designed for the 1# cylinders.

Hope I didn't misunderstand your question...

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-18-2019 06:50 PM

here is a link to some info on high vs low pressure stoves

https://weekendrvadventures.com/low-pressure-stove/


I did contact camp chef and did confirm all there mountain series stoves do run on high pressure. There regulator takes the tank pressure down to 10PSI .This high pressure is how they get 20,000 BTU per burner on the everest

CharlesinGA 12-18-2019 07:35 PM

I bought a CharBroil Grill 2Go X200. Got it for $99. It is an infrared tabletop grill. fits perfectly in a Home Depot Husky 17gal plastic tote. Its a pain to clean however. Co-worker I travel with bought another brand infrared grill from Sams Club. Took it back, bought a Blackstone 17 inch griddle. He hard plumbed a hose (to the griddle in place of the pound bottle connection) to connect to the camper's low pressure propane fitting (the regulator that comes with it accepts 1"lb bottles). I bought the same 17 inch Blackstone griddle from Wal-Mart on end of the season clearance for $54. found a special quick disconnect that replaced the regulator and tube, to allow a hose to connect to the camper or with a regulator to a 20/30 lb bottle.

I also carry a single burner electric hotplate and a china made butane unit, $19 at the Korean grocery, Butane cannisters are cheap there also.

The Blackstone is very easy to clean, and you can cook the entire breakfast or dinner on it at once, eggs on one side, sausage or bacon on the other.

Charles

Civilguy 12-18-2019 08:04 PM

Thanks Mike and Jon. I have heard mention of this in the past, but never really paid attention or ran it down to see what the deal is. The RV Adventure link was especially helpful.

So, 11" WC (0.4 psi) being what I was familiar with, I didn't realize there's also a 10 psi standard; that's 277 inches of water column, so quite the difference.

k corbin 12-19-2019 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 763076)

One issue I have with stoves like the GSI Selkirk type of design is the restriction to a smaller size pan; with the windscreen in place two pans on the stove is very cramped.

you just needed to read the bullet list of information for the Selkirk to see that the windscreens fold out of the way when you want to use larger pots.


wraparound windscreens prevent gusts and inclement weather from slowing your cooking to a crawl, but fold out of the way for use with larger pots on calm days.

Jon in AZ 12-19-2019 07:26 AM

Made me check, Mike, and youíre right- the high pressure standard is 10 psi, far higher than the 14Ē WC I mentioned. I canít recall where I got the 14Ē figure... probably a product of a faulty memory. There was another recent discussion about connecting a Coleman-type stove to the regulated trailer LP system and the pressure difference came up.

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-19-2019 07:43 AM

well all this talk about stoves and propane hookup. Made me realize how unhappy i with my current grill set up (smoke hollow) After some research I ended up ordering a scratch and dent Napoleon 285 grill . I thinking it will go right on the hose escape trailers supplies with the propane quick connect option

Jon in AZ 12-19-2019 08:00 AM

Yes. Lots of choices, so no reason to keep using something that doesnít work for you!

Grilling for us is charcoal, or not at all. Our Weber Little Joe does the job. I really need to make a carry case for it. That would solve my only real issue- how to transport it.

Rzrbrn 12-19-2019 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k corbin (Post 763205)
you just needed to read the bullet list of information for the Selkirk to see that the windscreens fold out of the way when you want to use larger pots.


wraparound windscreens prevent gusts and inclement weather from slowing your cooking to a crawl, but fold out of the way for use with larger pots on calm days.

I don't have a Selkirk, which is why I said this "type" of stove. Similar stoves have wings that fold out, but it is the back cover that does not and is one of the constraining factors on these stoves. That and the burners are too close together to put a 11 or 12" pan and maybe a pot to boil water. Still and all, with a bit of care they will cook a meal.

Casita Greg 12-19-2019 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlsara (Post 763130)
Do any of you have a stove that has leveling feet. That is the only problem I have had with either the Coleman propane or the butane burner we use now. I end up sticking spoons or something under it as very few outside tables are level.

The Camp Chef legs all have adjustable feet. Just twist the threaded feet out as needed to find level.

https://www.campchef.com/leg-levelers.html

charlsara 12-19-2019 02:56 PM

Thanks Greg. I took a look. All those look to bulky for me. I will continue to use the little butane units. I do think I will make a little frame with leveling feet to go under them.

Jon Vermilye 12-19-2019 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlsara (Post 763266)
Thanks Greg. I took a look. All those look to bulky for me. I will continue to use the little butane units. I do think I will make a little frame with leveling feet to go under them.

I also use a single burner butane stove. For those that camp in freezing or sub zero temperatures, it might be better to get a dual fuel version such as this and keep a propane cylinder handy. Here is why. Butane doesn't evaporate at low temperatures, although back when I braved the cold I sometimes put a butane cylinder under my coat to get it started...

Ev in Oregon 12-19-2019 03:11 PM

Super stove!
 
I bought my Coleman 2-burner, "white gas" stove in 1974. I have taken good care of it, including yearly preventive maintenance. It just keeps on going and going and going. And, no issue with flame intensity.

I can't vouch for the newer propane models (no desire for one), or even present-day Coleman products, but if they last anywhere close to 45 years, I'd consider it a good investment!

CarlD 12-19-2019 03:25 PM

I like my camp chef 2 burner. Solid construction, plenty of heat, adjustable mixture. Easy to clean.

https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/camp...2-burner-stove

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-19-2019 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarlD (Post 763271)
I like my camp chef 2 burner. Solid construction, plenty of heat, adjustable mixture. Easy to clean.

https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/camp...2-burner-stove






How does that preform in high wind? I now have the Everest witch does great in wind because of the wind sheild. But its high pressure and i thinking of a grill and stove hooked to the low pressure system of the rv

Jim Bennett 12-19-2019 08:13 PM

I have used many a Coleman stove over the years, and by far my favourite for built and cooking capability was a white gas one I have many, many years ago. All the other propane ones were dependable, but did not cook hot or very evenly on the pan, and simmer was..... well, almost non-existent for me.

I have had a Camp Chef Ranger II for about 3 years now, and I just love it. Built super tough, heats things super fast, has great burners that spread flame all across a pan bottom, and simmers wonderfully. If you cook a pancake full size in a large fry pan, it comes out super evenly cooked across the whole thing. :)

Another big bonus for me is that it is super easy to convert to low pressure connecting, whereas a Coleman is almost impossible to do this with.

CarlD 12-20-2019 10:05 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWYORKHILLBILLY (Post 763272)
How does that preform in high wind? I now have the Everest witch does great in wind because of the wind sheild. But its high pressure and i thinking of a grill and stove hooked to the low pressure system of the rv




Mine is the same model as Jim Bennett's. The burners are recessed into the stove and I have not had them blow out. You do lose some heating because of the wind. A wind shield would be nice. It is a heavy duty stove built from cast parts. The bottom heat shield is easily removed for cleaning by removing 2 bolts. I have a long low pressure hose I connect to my propane system. I also use the propane line for my charcoal lighter.




I had a Coleman hyperflame and did not like it. It did not burn clean, was poorly constructed stamped metal design, and it was difficult to adjust the flame where you wanted it. It felt like there were o-rings in the controls that backed off on the setting when you took your hand off it. When I took it back to Cabelas the said other people had also returned them.

Civilguy 12-20-2019 11:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarlD (Post 763297)
I had a Coleman hyperflame and did not like it. It did not burn clean, was poorly constructed stamped metal design, and it was difficult to adjust the flame where you wanted it. It felt like there were o-rings in the controls that backed off on the setting when you took your hand off it. When I took it back to Cabelas the said other people had also returned them.

Yes, the Hyperflame is the same model as the Gladiator stove I mentioned. It's now marketed as the FyreKnight.

Ours burned clean and I'd say the windscreen around the burners worked well. It also accommodates larger pans better than some of the other little sheet-metal camp stoves.

The sheet metal construction isn't especially robust. The case is okay, but the brace which is supposed to hold the lid up in place is funky and does not inspire confidence. I expect that issue could be cured easily enough with a bit of thought.

However, the controls were the biggest nuisance in my view. I tried lubricating the O-rings, but it still did the same thing, rotating the knob and rotating back a bit after being adjusted.

This fellow (Uncle Fjester) posted a review on the Coleman site and says he has a fix posted on YouTube. I've linked a shorter video showing the stove simmering perfectly, followed by another, much longer video showing how he managed to get the stove valves to quit springing back after adjustment. I'm intrigued. I don't recall what I used to try and lubricate the O-rings, but the silicone spray he used appears to be very effective.

https://youtu.be/e1HxNci_v7o?t=90

https://youtu.be/vREI5oG6RyM?t=357

Rzrbrn 12-20-2019 11:46 AM

Civilguy, your picture of the wooden shims as a way to level a camp stove is one of those "DUH" moments! Thank you for posting that, it is just the thing. I have a number of small wooden squares that I cut from various thickness of wood panels. Your wood shim I idea is so much better.

CPW 12-20-2019 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 763306)
Civilguy, your picture of the wooden shims as a way to level a camp stove is one of those "DUH" moments! Thank you for posting that, it is just the thing. I have a number of small wooden squares that I cut from various thickness of wood panels. Your wood shim I idea is so much better.

I use paint stir sticks as shims. They can be doubled or tripled up depending on how far out of level the stove is. And the price is well, typically free. All you have to do is ask for a couple every time you go to Loweís or Home Depot.

Iowa Dave 12-20-2019 08:40 PM

Though I donít haul them camping because of the size and weight I have a couple Rocky Mountain Range stoves which were originally built in the USA. I think Salt Lake City. The later ones were built in the Far East and were not so good. Point is that if you ever get a chance to buy one and itís the old style from about 20 years ago they were very good. The gas valve was as good or better than about any stove Iíve ever cooked on in a house. Very smooth and meters down so low itís hard to see the flame if itís not dark. The old green Colemanís with white gas served me for many years. Iím running a Camp Chef Everest in the Escape for the past 7 seasons. I use the 11 lb bottle that I store in my front box. The adapter hose is from Weber and fits my 120 too. I have a quick connect on the Escape but only use it once in a while after removing the regulator from the Campfire in a can hose and replacing it with the male quick connect fitting. A nice fire that goes for 2-3 hours uses 1/4 of a small 11lb tank.
Iowa Dave

Iowa Dave 12-20-2019 09:29 PM

Conversion
 
And another thing depending upon how deep your love affair with those great old Coleman white gas stoves goes. The white gas today is ridiculously expensive and the old stoves can’t burn just unleaded gas. About 25 years ago when I was in scouting we purchased from Campmor, converter feed tubes for the three burner Colemans we had and began to feed them off of the 20lb propane tanks with a ten foot hose and a fitting that would screw to the adapter.
Worked well. I checked tonight and couldn’t find any on the Campmor site but found some made by Mr Heater that looked ok. They were like $23 but in time would pay for themselves and would allow you to date your old cooking friend again. Just a thought.
Iowa Dave

Al and Cindy K 12-21-2019 08:29 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Iowa Dave (Post 763319)
Though I don’t haul them camping because of the size and weight I have a couple Rocky Mountain Range stoves which were originally built in the USA. I think Salt Lake City. The later ones were built in the Far East and were not so good. Point is that if you ever get a chance to buy one and it’s the old style from about 20 years ago they were very good. The gas valve was as good or better than about any stove I’ve ever cooked on in a house. Very smooth and meters down so low it’s hard to see the flame if it’s not dark. The old green Coleman’s with white gas served me for many years. ............removed regulator from the Campfire in a can hose and replacing it with the male quick connect fitting. A nice fire that goes for 2-3 hours uses 1/4 of a small 11lb tank.
Iowa Dave

Great recommendation on the Rocky Mountain Range stoves Dave. We have two as well - a Cimmaron (one of the early models and rock solid) and a Sea of Cortez purchased when they were closing everything out. The newer version has also been good after I replaced all the poorly done pop rivets. Both simmer well and turn out a great pork loin with their barbecue accessory. Agree about the weight.

As noted earlier, we've gone back to my old Coleman liquid fuel stoves and lanterns. They work and they bring back a lot of old memories, sounds and smells. The Crown fuel brand is usually much cheaper than the Coleman and works just as well.

We also have a Campfire in a Can and love it. With all this common gear, you think we might be related somewhere along the line?:omy

On the leveling shim solution, we use the house siding samples often available in the big box stores. I stacked several of these up, drilled a hole through them at one end with a bolt and wing nut to keep them together and store them in the stove. When leveling is needed, just remove the wing nut and use ever how many may be necessary to even things out. They're plastic so no problems with moisture or grease.

Rzrbrn 12-21-2019 11:18 AM

Al thanks for the house siding samples tip, yet another idea that never occurred to me. Between the these and the previous wooden shim things, I think I can improve my stove leveling technique.

Iowa Dave 12-21-2019 05:34 PM

Shims
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 763335)
Al thanks for the house siding samples tip, yet another idea that never occurred to me. Between the these and the previous wooden shim things, I think I can improve my stove leveling technique.

You can also use Formica samples available at Big box stores. They are a pretty durable shim and can be drilled.
Iowa Dave

Grant Allen 12-25-2019 11:17 AM

Camp Chef Ranger ll
 
Works nicely, has a good simmer setting and connects to my quick connect on my trailer. Two things my Coleman could’nt do. Works good in the wind too. Bought a plastic container it fits in perfect.

Rzrbrn 12-25-2019 12:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grant Allen (Post 763608)
Works nicely, has a good simmer setting and connects to my quick connect on my trailer. Two things my Coleman couldínt do. Works good in the wind too. Bought a plastic container it fits in perfect.

Grant, I also have the Camp Chef Ranger II Blind stove. I have a plastic container but it does not fit all that well. Would you please post the specific container you have and perhaps from where you bought it?

Tideline77 12-25-2019 12:54 PM

Does anyone use an portable induction cooktop?

Rzrbrn 12-25-2019 01:17 PM

Just got one today as a xmas present. I intend on using it camping when we stay at a campsite with electricity. In the meantime I will use it at home to get comfortable with it.

jim_ivy 12-25-2019 04:42 PM

Not propane, but...
 
My Svea 123 that I purchased back in the 70's still works great when I want to cook outside of the trailer. Takes about the same storage space as a can of beans. Burns Coleman fuel and a single filling will last me a week of daily use. They have gone up in price, but after over 40 years the darn thing still works like new.

Rzrbrn 12-25-2019 05:06 PM

Jim, I have had my Svea 123R for a bit also and it continues to work well. I also like the sound it makes. I also have a Coleman Feather 442 gas stove, but I find I use the Coleman 533 dual fuel stove more than any of them, and take it when we are on the RV trail.

ThomasC 12-25-2019 05:07 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by jim_ivy (Post 763643)
My Svea 123 that I purchased back in the 70's still works great when I want to cook outside of the trailer. Takes about the same storage space as a can of beans. Burns Coleman fuel and a single filling will last me a week of daily use. They have gone up in price, but after over 40 years the darn thing still works like new.

I was cleaning out the barn a few months ago and I found my coleman single burner stove that fits inside two square pans with a detachable handle. This is a photo from the internet. Mine is green and I must say it is perfect. I think I only used it once.

Rzrbrn 12-25-2019 05:11 PM

Tom, first time I have seen that Coleman in red. Nice.

John in Santa Cruz 12-25-2019 05:58 PM

I used a Svea 123R in the early 70s.... Dug it out a few years ago, the MSR whitegas stove I'd been using put out like 2-3X more BTUs of heat.

nowdays, we do most of our camp cooking in the trailer's oven, and I use a jetboil sumo to boil water for coffee.

Jack Walter 12-25-2019 07:38 PM

Partner Steel stove is what I use - its built like a tank and has great simmer control. I use a 6 pound propane tank which can be refilled at any propane outlet for under $3.00.



The Partner Steel stove is the stove to have in the overlanding crowd. They were developed for white water rafting expeditions and are pretty much indestructible. They have a variety of sizes - they aren't cheap but they will be the last stove you ever have to buy.

Doc.Kev 12-25-2019 08:33 PM

Camp Chef gets my vote.
We have all the brands mentioned above but now only use the Camp Chef Everest. Got ours at REI.

EllPea in CA 12-27-2019 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Civilguy (Post 763140)
These will level the stove, and can also help adjust the simmer on a Coleman Gladiator!

Or, you could just buy a stove that does a better job of simmering.

I bring a collection of rubber doorstop wedges from the dollar store. They usually have several in a package, and usually two sizes. I always need to level a camp table or two, and these are perfect for that. Yes, I also bring a little level:reye2

AdamNH 01-15-2020 11:14 AM

Hello, I figured I should update this with what I bought....
It was a tough decision but I ended up going with the Campfire Everest. That brand and that model seemed to be well regarded on this forum and had good reviews elsewhere. I liked that it folded together and was "self contained". I was tempted by the more substantial looking Ranger II, but didn't want to deal with a separate storage container and it looked a bit heavier and bulkier.

I wanted to get the Partner steel stove, but just couldn't justify the higher cost even though I like that it is built in the USA to last a lifetime. If we end up using this stove a lot that could be the eventual upgrade.

I loved the look of the Pro60 and the Explorer with legs attached but they just seemed to big and they were quite heavy. They looked nice to cook on but like overkill.

Camp chef should work on their website. It is difficult to navigate because its confusing how they catagorize the various stoves. They also have too many products. I can't tell what is different about the Camp Chef Summit vs. the Everest. And now they appear have an "Everest 2x". They all look very similar.

Hopefully the Everest will have good turndown on the burners like the reviews said.

Civilguy 01-15-2020 03:27 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Campchef Everest and Buffalo Plaid for the win!

Attachment 132839

Outdoor gear lab seems to really like them, I expect it will serve you well.

Sometimes I wish I only had a choice between three brands, like Penneys, Sears and Montgomery Wards. Maybe none of the choices would be truly excellent, but I could make a decision and move on with my life.

Nowadays with all the brands and models and reviews available on the Internet, there's a constant risk of feeling that you aren't making the absolutely best choice, which can in turn feel depressing.

We recently bought one of the least expensive headlamps. We didn't want something suited to trail-finding. In fact, we primarily just wanted to be good neighbors in the public campgrounds so picked the Petzl Tikkina, an inexpensive unit with rather low lumens.

Sometimes it's hard not to go all-in for the most highly-rated thing out there. In this case, it would not have suited our needs, and would likely have served as a source of annoyance to others.

Rzrbrn 01-15-2020 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Civilguy (Post 765428)
Campchef Everest and Buffalo Plaid for the win!

Attachment 132839

Outdoor gear lab seems to really like them, I expect it will serve you well.

Sometimes I wish I only had a choice between three brands, like Penneys, Sears and Montgomery Wards. Maybe none of the choices would be truly excellent, but I could make a decision and move on with my life.

Nowadays with all the brands and models and reviews available on the Internet, there's a constant risk of feeling that you aren't making the absolutely best choice, which can in turn feel depressing.

We recently bought one of the least expensive headlamps. We didn't want something suited to trail-finding. In fact, we primarily just wanted to be good neighbors in the public campgrounds so picked the Petzl Tikkina, an inexpensive unit with rather low lumens.

Sometimes it's hard not to go all-in for the most highly-rated thing out there. In this case, it would not have suited our needs, and would likely have served as a source of annoyance to others.

Not meaning to hijack this thread but lights drive me nuts. I use a cheap headlamp because it turns on an off. It does not strobe, it does not have a super bright setting or ten other light levels, it does not have a red light...I just want a flashlight and headlamp that with one click it goes on. And one click it goes off...

cpaharley2008 01-15-2020 05:20 PM

I really like that round wind breaker on that stove in the photo......:)


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