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NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-18-2019 06:50 PM

here is a link to some info on high vs low pressure stoves

https://weekendrvadventures.com/low-pressure-stove/


I did contact camp chef and did confirm all there mountain series stoves do run on high pressure. There regulator takes the tank pressure down to 10PSI .This high pressure is how they get 20,000 BTU per burner on the everest

CharlesinGA 12-18-2019 07:35 PM

I bought a CharBroil Grill 2Go X200. Got it for $99. It is an infrared tabletop grill. fits perfectly in a Home Depot Husky 17gal plastic tote. Its a pain to clean however. Co-worker I travel with bought another brand infrared grill from Sams Club. Took it back, bought a Blackstone 17 inch griddle. He hard plumbed a hose (to the griddle in place of the pound bottle connection) to connect to the camper's low pressure propane fitting (the regulator that comes with it accepts 1"lb bottles). I bought the same 17 inch Blackstone griddle from Wal-Mart on end of the season clearance for $54. found a special quick disconnect that replaced the regulator and tube, to allow a hose to connect to the camper or with a regulator to a 20/30 lb bottle.

I also carry a single burner electric hotplate and a china made butane unit, $19 at the Korean grocery, Butane cannisters are cheap there also.

The Blackstone is very easy to clean, and you can cook the entire breakfast or dinner on it at once, eggs on one side, sausage or bacon on the other.

Charles

Civilguy 12-18-2019 08:04 PM

Thanks Mike and Jon. I have heard mention of this in the past, but never really paid attention or ran it down to see what the deal is. The RV Adventure link was especially helpful.

So, 11" WC (0.4 psi) being what I was familiar with, I didn't realize there's also a 10 psi standard; that's 277 inches of water column, so quite the difference.

k corbin 12-19-2019 07:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 763076)

One issue I have with stoves like the GSI Selkirk type of design is the restriction to a smaller size pan; with the windscreen in place two pans on the stove is very cramped.

you just needed to read the bullet list of information for the Selkirk to see that the windscreens fold out of the way when you want to use larger pots.


wraparound windscreens prevent gusts and inclement weather from slowing your cooking to a crawl, but fold out of the way for use with larger pots on calm days.

Jon in AZ 12-19-2019 07:26 AM

Made me check, Mike, and youíre right- the high pressure standard is 10 psi, far higher than the 14Ē WC I mentioned. I canít recall where I got the 14Ē figure... probably a product of a faulty memory. There was another recent discussion about connecting a Coleman-type stove to the regulated trailer LP system and the pressure difference came up.

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-19-2019 07:43 AM

well all this talk about stoves and propane hookup. Made me realize how unhappy i with my current grill set up (smoke hollow) After some research I ended up ordering a scratch and dent Napoleon 285 grill . I thinking it will go right on the hose escape trailers supplies with the propane quick connect option

Jon in AZ 12-19-2019 08:00 AM

Yes. Lots of choices, so no reason to keep using something that doesnít work for you!

Grilling for us is charcoal, or not at all. Our Weber Little Joe does the job. I really need to make a carry case for it. That would solve my only real issue- how to transport it.

Rzrbrn 12-19-2019 08:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by k corbin (Post 763205)
you just needed to read the bullet list of information for the Selkirk to see that the windscreens fold out of the way when you want to use larger pots.


wraparound windscreens prevent gusts and inclement weather from slowing your cooking to a crawl, but fold out of the way for use with larger pots on calm days.

I don't have a Selkirk, which is why I said this "type" of stove. Similar stoves have wings that fold out, but it is the back cover that does not and is one of the constraining factors on these stoves. That and the burners are too close together to put a 11 or 12" pan and maybe a pot to boil water. Still and all, with a bit of care they will cook a meal.

Casita Greg 12-19-2019 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlsara (Post 763130)
Do any of you have a stove that has leveling feet. That is the only problem I have had with either the Coleman propane or the butane burner we use now. I end up sticking spoons or something under it as very few outside tables are level.

The Camp Chef legs all have adjustable feet. Just twist the threaded feet out as needed to find level.

https://www.campchef.com/leg-levelers.html

charlsara 12-19-2019 02:56 PM

Thanks Greg. I took a look. All those look to bulky for me. I will continue to use the little butane units. I do think I will make a little frame with leveling feet to go under them.

Jon Vermilye 12-19-2019 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by charlsara (Post 763266)
Thanks Greg. I took a look. All those look to bulky for me. I will continue to use the little butane units. I do think I will make a little frame with leveling feet to go under them.

I also use a single burner butane stove. For those that camp in freezing or sub zero temperatures, it might be better to get a dual fuel version such as this and keep a propane cylinder handy. Here is why. Butane doesn't evaporate at low temperatures, although back when I braved the cold I sometimes put a butane cylinder under my coat to get it started...

Ev in Oregon 12-19-2019 03:11 PM

Super stove!
 
I bought my Coleman 2-burner, "white gas" stove in 1974. I have taken good care of it, including yearly preventive maintenance. It just keeps on going and going and going. And, no issue with flame intensity.

I can't vouch for the newer propane models (no desire for one), or even present-day Coleman products, but if they last anywhere close to 45 years, I'd consider it a good investment!

CarlD 12-19-2019 03:25 PM

I like my camp chef 2 burner. Solid construction, plenty of heat, adjustable mixture. Easy to clean.

https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/camp...2-burner-stove

NEWYORKHILLBILLY 12-19-2019 03:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarlD (Post 763271)
I like my camp chef 2 burner. Solid construction, plenty of heat, adjustable mixture. Easy to clean.

https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/camp...2-burner-stove






How does that preform in high wind? I now have the Everest witch does great in wind because of the wind sheild. But its high pressure and i thinking of a grill and stove hooked to the low pressure system of the rv

Jim Bennett 12-19-2019 08:13 PM

I have used many a Coleman stove over the years, and by far my favourite for built and cooking capability was a white gas one I have many, many years ago. All the other propane ones were dependable, but did not cook hot or very evenly on the pan, and simmer was..... well, almost non-existent for me.

I have had a Camp Chef Ranger II for about 3 years now, and I just love it. Built super tough, heats things super fast, has great burners that spread flame all across a pan bottom, and simmers wonderfully. If you cook a pancake full size in a large fry pan, it comes out super evenly cooked across the whole thing. :)

Another big bonus for me is that it is super easy to convert to low pressure connecting, whereas a Coleman is almost impossible to do this with.

CarlD 12-20-2019 10:05 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by NEWYORKHILLBILLY (Post 763272)
How does that preform in high wind? I now have the Everest witch does great in wind because of the wind sheild. But its high pressure and i thinking of a grill and stove hooked to the low pressure system of the rv




Mine is the same model as Jim Bennett's. The burners are recessed into the stove and I have not had them blow out. You do lose some heating because of the wind. A wind shield would be nice. It is a heavy duty stove built from cast parts. The bottom heat shield is easily removed for cleaning by removing 2 bolts. I have a long low pressure hose I connect to my propane system. I also use the propane line for my charcoal lighter.




I had a Coleman hyperflame and did not like it. It did not burn clean, was poorly constructed stamped metal design, and it was difficult to adjust the flame where you wanted it. It felt like there were o-rings in the controls that backed off on the setting when you took your hand off it. When I took it back to Cabelas the said other people had also returned them.

Civilguy 12-20-2019 11:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CarlD (Post 763297)
I had a Coleman hyperflame and did not like it. It did not burn clean, was poorly constructed stamped metal design, and it was difficult to adjust the flame where you wanted it. It felt like there were o-rings in the controls that backed off on the setting when you took your hand off it. When I took it back to Cabelas the said other people had also returned them.

Yes, the Hyperflame is the same model as the Gladiator stove I mentioned. It's now marketed as the FyreKnight.

Ours burned clean and I'd say the windscreen around the burners worked well. It also accommodates larger pans better than some of the other little sheet-metal camp stoves.

The sheet metal construction isn't especially robust. The case is okay, but the brace which is supposed to hold the lid up in place is funky and does not inspire confidence. I expect that issue could be cured easily enough with a bit of thought.

However, the controls were the biggest nuisance in my view. I tried lubricating the O-rings, but it still did the same thing, rotating the knob and rotating back a bit after being adjusted.

This fellow (Uncle Fjester) posted a review on the Coleman site and says he has a fix posted on YouTube. I've linked a shorter video showing the stove simmering perfectly, followed by another, much longer video showing how he managed to get the stove valves to quit springing back after adjustment. I'm intrigued. I don't recall what I used to try and lubricate the O-rings, but the silicone spray he used appears to be very effective.

https://youtu.be/e1HxNci_v7o?t=90

https://youtu.be/vREI5oG6RyM?t=357

Rzrbrn 12-20-2019 11:46 AM

Civilguy, your picture of the wooden shims as a way to level a camp stove is one of those "DUH" moments! Thank you for posting that, it is just the thing. I have a number of small wooden squares that I cut from various thickness of wood panels. Your wood shim I idea is so much better.

CPW 12-20-2019 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rzrbrn (Post 763306)
Civilguy, your picture of the wooden shims as a way to level a camp stove is one of those "DUH" moments! Thank you for posting that, it is just the thing. I have a number of small wooden squares that I cut from various thickness of wood panels. Your wood shim I idea is so much better.

I use paint stir sticks as shims. They can be doubled or tripled up depending on how far out of level the stove is. And the price is well, typically free. All you have to do is ask for a couple every time you go to Loweís or Home Depot.

Iowa Dave 12-20-2019 08:40 PM

Though I donít haul them camping because of the size and weight I have a couple Rocky Mountain Range stoves which were originally built in the USA. I think Salt Lake City. The later ones were built in the Far East and were not so good. Point is that if you ever get a chance to buy one and itís the old style from about 20 years ago they were very good. The gas valve was as good or better than about any stove Iíve ever cooked on in a house. Very smooth and meters down so low itís hard to see the flame if itís not dark. The old green Colemanís with white gas served me for many years. Iím running a Camp Chef Everest in the Escape for the past 7 seasons. I use the 11 lb bottle that I store in my front box. The adapter hose is from Weber and fits my 120 too. I have a quick connect on the Escape but only use it once in a while after removing the regulator from the Campfire in a can hose and replacing it with the male quick connect fitting. A nice fire that goes for 2-3 hours uses 1/4 of a small 11lb tank.
Iowa Dave


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